Oxleas wood management plan,painted coffee tables for sale kenya,wooden doors new designs - Easy Way

12.09.2015
They almost ploughed a road through it a few years back, but somehow Oxleas Wood survived, and it remains one of the most ancient deciduous areas of woodland  in the capital, the jewels in Shooters Hill's green crown, on the fringes of Greenwich borough. Cool Places celebrates the glorious diversity of Great Britain, promoting the very best places to sleep, eat, drink, see, and shop. Sign up for Cool Places to find out about the very best UK hotels, cafes, pubs, restaurants and shops - and review them yourself.
Shooters Hill Woodlands includes Oxleas Wood, Jack Wood and Castle Wood, as well as Sheperdleas Wood now part of Eltham Park North and Eltham Common. Ye who have a spark in your veins of Cockney spirit, smile or mourn according as you take things well or ill;— Bold Britons, we are now on Shooter's Hill! There are just a few days left to tell TfL our opinions about their proposed new river crossings at Gallions Reach and Belvedere: the consultation closes this Friday, 12th February. The NO2 results map shows that the UK Air Quality Strategy and EU legislation  40 µg m? limit for NO2 was exceeded at most measurement locations in Shooters Hill and Plumstead: at two sites along Plumstead Common Road and all sites along Shooters Hill and Shooters Hill Road. TfL would have far more chance of reducing traffic congestion and pollution by improving our current very unreliable and overcrowded public transport and creating new public transport links than by building more roads which will attract more traffic.
We plan to submit an application for powers to implement the Silvertown Tunnel scheme in the spring 2016, and we will contact you again at this time once we are in a position to publish our Consultation Report.
If our application is accepted by the Secretary of State, there will be a public examination on the scheme managed by the Planning Inspectorate. The first complication is that the report assumes that the proposed Silvertown Tunnel has already been built. The Silvertown Traffic Forecasting Report also considers in Appendix C the impact of the Gallions and Belvedere crossings on traffic flows. The reports contain a large number of tables, graphs and maps of the traffic modelling results.
The scale and resolution of the maps make it difficult to work out which local roads suffer traffic increases, but it’s just about possible by zooming in and looking at the shape and orientation of the roads. Bringing the Silvertown Tunnel into the model there is a decrease in traffic flow along Shrewsbury Lane and Plum Lane, but an increase in Red Lion Lane which runs in a similar direction.
In the Silvertown Tunnel report the impact of the additional crossings at Gallions Reach and Belvedere is a very slight reduction of traffic along Shrewsbury Lane, but an increase along Eaglesfield Road to Plum Lane which is unexpected (and unlikely I would have thought), and an increase in Plum Lane itself.
It also predicts that traffic going along the bottom of Herbert Road, through the shops will increase. The final map, from the current consultation, is similar to the previous one but now there is an increase in traffic along both Shrewsbury Lane and Eaglesfield Road. The striking feature of all of these maps is the amount of red on them, showing cumulative increases in traffic flows as each crossing is built.
Similar points could be made about many of the other roads showing increased congestion on TfL’s maps.
With increased traffic and increased congestion comes increased pollution, and that means increased damage to people. The main effect of breathing in raised levels of nitrogen dioxide is the increased likelihood of respiratory problems. Increased levels of nitrogen dioxide can have significant impacts on people with asthma because it can cause more frequent and more intense attacks. The UK Air Quality Strategy and EU legislation both set an annual average limit for NO2 of  40 µg m-?. As I’ve said before in posts about a previous consultation and about Oxleas Wood  TfL need to say how they will solve the inadequacies of the transport network south of the Thames and demonstrate that new crossings will not cause congestion and pollution in residential roads.
It is shocking the number of people living in Plumstead who argue that traffic will be reduced, when even TfL’s models (and answer in Parliament) say otherwise. Transport for London are continuing with their plans to build a new bridge at Gallions Reach, but it’s the beginning of the end for the Woolwich Free Ferry following the results of the consultation into new river crossings east of the Blackwall Tunnel. The majority of feedback supported the introduction of new fixed link crossings, rather than enhancement of existing or introduction of new ferry crossings. We will put our consideration of proposals for a new ferry at Woolwich and a ferry at Gallions Reach on hold, pending the outcome of this work. The Consultation Report gives all the results and presents a selection of the comments made by the public about each of the options.
In the image at the top the new Gallions Reach bridge would cross the river roughly in the centre of the photo, this side of the Barking Creek tidal barrier – the high structure just to the right of centre,  on the river.
The proposal for a new tunnel at Silvertown was not included in this consultation, in fact it is assumed in all the supporting documents that the Silvertown Tunnel will have been built by the time any of the consultation options are constructed. As well as the Consultation Report, TfL have published a Response to the Issues Raised document which gives TfL’s opinion on specific objections raised about the different crossing options.
TfL’s response on concerns about the threat to Oxleas Wood points out the differences between the current proposals and earlier schemes such as the East London River Crossing. It is not the intent that the new crossings will provide a new strategic route for traffic with no local origin or destination, and it is not intended to carry traffic between the A2 and the North Circular, a journey which would remain more convenient via the Blackwall tunnel.
The response also mentions that the Gallions Reach Bridge would be one of three new crossings, with the Silvertown Tunnel and Belvedere Bridge, so the traffic load would be spread, and it asserts that tolling the crossings will allow TfL to manage how much traffic uses them. Whatever emerges from the next steps the future doesn’t look good for the Woolwich Free Ferry. It’s hard to believe now that the little track running into Oxleas Wood from Shooters Hill was once the drive way to the Portland-stone Palladian mansion shown in the photograph above from Greenwich Heritage Centre. When the mansion was built in 1864-67 by the 2nd Lord Truro, Charles Robert Wilde,  it was called Falconhurst. Lord Truro left the place and a strip of freehold land on the other side of the road to a very beautiful lady of limited virtue.
The caricature of Lord Truro below is from the National Portrait gallery and is reproduced under the creative commons licence, as is the image of Baroness d’Erlanger further down.
Catherine herself was photographed by Cecil Beaton, and also by Lafayette Ltd in the picture below from the National Portrait Gallery. The house next door to Falconwood was Warren Wood, home of our favourite Shooters Hill historian Colonel Bagnold, and his more famous daughter Enid Bagnold. What is the connection between this Falconwood, near the top of Shooters Hill, and Falconwood the place down the hill?  A.D. As for the site of the mansion it is now a peaceful butterfly-filled meadow only occasionally enlivened by walkers and dogs. Two thousand and twenty-eight pages in eighteen impenetrable documents have been published by Transport for London as part of their consultation on new river crossings in East London, and nowhere does it discuss the prospect of increased traffic in residential roads south of the river. Also, bizarrely, all the traffic modelling assumes that the Silvertown Tunnel is already in place! This assumption that the Silvertown Tunnel has already been built pervades the Traffic Impact Report, to the extent that many of the traffic flow maps  don’t show how traffic will change compared to today, but how they will change compared to the flow after the Silvertown Tunnel has been developed. It should be noted that the RXHAM is strategic in nature and is used to identify broad changes in traffic patterns across the highway network, as well as the magnitude of this change.


The map shows some traffic increase through Plumstead and Knee Hill, but surprisingly nothing coming from the South Circular at Woolwich. TfL’s work on the traffic impacts of a Gallions Reach crossing will not, in my opinion, be complete unless they include a convincing, costed proposal for solving the inadequacies of the transport network south of the Thames that politicians commit to. I expressed surprise at the results of the traffic modelling: in particular the predicted reduced traffic flows from the South Circular Road through Woolwich to a proposed Gallions Reach Bridge, and that the increased flows predicted seemed to show traffic would go along the M25 as far as the approach to the Dartford Crossing, and then turn off along the Thames to Gallions Rach to cross there.
As long as you’re not put off by some hilly bits, this fun walk takes in some beautiful sites as you stroll past Charlton House, Serverndroog Castle, Woolwich Common and Oxleas Meadow.
Starting at the Green Chain signpost on the riverside by the Thames Barrier, cross the embankment, pass the coach park, cross two roads and follow the marker posts through the gardens and the open space to Woolwich Road and enter the park.
Turn left almost at the end, following the markers alongside the railings, and leave the part at the gate to Charlton Park Lane.
At the castle, go down the steps to the garden and take a left through Jackwood, turning right into another garden. This website and associated newspapers adhere to the Independent Press Standards Organisation's Editors' Code of Practice. It's actually just one of several linked woodlands up here, and encompasses Castle Woods – home to grand folly Severndroog Castle – Jack Woods and other bits of park and woodland. We particularly love the independent businesses that make the UK unique, from artisan bakers to farm shops, canoe trips to gastronomic tours, cool cafes to high-end restaurants and the tiniest B&B to the grandest boutique hotel. The excellent Bexley Against Road Crossings web site has many more suggestions about what to say to TfL. The No to Silvertown Tunnel campaign undertook an extensive citizen science project to measure Nitrogen Dioxide levels across Greenwich in 2014. The cross roads at Shooters Hill Road and Academy Road, close to the Greenwich Free School and just down the hill from Christchurch Primary School  had an NO2 level 162.5% of the limit. It seems obvious to me that you would have fewer bridges closer to the sea because the river gets wider at it nears its estuary. In that case, you will have an opportunity to make written representations and take part in hearings as part of the examination.
This was the question I looked for answers to in the documentation accompanying Transport for London’s latest consultation on the crossings. The reference case represents 2021, and includes growth in population and employment from the 2009 London Plan. Public transport connectivity across east and southeast London improves because of planned investment including Crossrail. From 2012 to 2021 the proportion of travel by car is expected to fall in Greenwich, Newham and Tower Hamlets, but the growth in population and employment result in an increase in total car trips. I’ve extracted four maps to try to give a flavour of the impact of the crossings on our local streets. The increase along  Plumstead Common Road looks even bigger, and also along Kings Highway, Wickham Lane down towards Knee Hill.
Along Shooters Hill and Shooters Hill Road traffic flows increase again, and the route down through Charlton to the tunnel has more traffic, affecting Baker Road and  Stadium Road past the hospital then Charlton Park Lane and Cemetery Lane.
Not unexpected are the additional increases in Plumstead Common Road and the route down to the High Street via Griffin Road, nor those from Plumstead Common down Kings Highway to Wickham Lane and Basildon Road and Eynsham Drive. Can you imagine even more cars trying to negotiate the hazardous route between parked vans and oncoming buses in the rush hour? For example, that nice straight red line showing increased traffic from Shooters Hill along  Shrewsbury Lane and Plum Lane through to Plumstead Common Road. There are campaigns in Plumstead and Bexley to oppose the crossings, largely because of the devastating impacts on local residential roads. In 2010 9,416 Londoners died as a result of air pollution, according to research by Kings College, London. Nitrogen dioxide inflames the lining of the lungs, and it can reduce immunity to lung infections.
In London in 2013 only two local authorities met the limit for NO2, and Greenwich wasn’t one of them. The main themes of this consultation are whether it would be better to build a bridge or dig a tunnel at the two locations, and about how public transport might link to them. Otherwise people will think that they are cynically conspiring to cause chaos and compromise air quality in south-east London so as to be able to justify a new motorway from the A2 to the river through Oxleas Wood, Woodlands Farm and hundreds of Plumstead homes. Having considered all of the issues raised in the consultation, we will now continue to develop the concepts of new bridges at Gallions Reach and Belvedere, and we will also consider whether tunnels would be more suitable by releasing greater land for development than would be possible with a bridge. In comparison the figures for improving the Woolwich Free Ferry were 19% and 18% respectively (37% total support).
Strangely it manages to find no comments in favour of the Woolwich Ferry option and a page and a half against.
Additional traffic capacity at Silvertown is the main plank of TfL’s defence against the charge that the road infrastructure south of the river is inadequate for the expected traffic going to the new crossing at Gallions Reach.
It has sections on concerns about increased traffic and congestion, and about the threat to Oxleas Wood. Part of their work in the next stage will be to work out what  impact a Gallions Reach Bridge will have on traffic flow and what they can do about it.
It was the home of Lords and Barons, painted by society artists and also once a hotel with 20 bedrooms.
Lord Truro was related to Sir James Plaisted Wilde, who became Lord Penzance, and lived nearby at Jackwood. Hart for the matter of the 1st part of this, it was he who helped bury Lady Truro, for all the rest I have relied on my memory only as I was familiar with all the facts at the time. It also says that they understood that the Lady’s remains were later removed by her relatives. Announcing her credentials boldly, she told the Baroness she was a journalist poised to write books. In June 1924 the Baroness applied to the London County Council for a licence to hold music and dancing entertainments in the drawing room on Falconwood’s ground floor.
In the archives there are Music and Dancing licence applications from Walter Frank Mills in 1933, Frederick Henry Clark in 1934 and F. This district was developed in the 1930s as Falconwood Park on the site of a large wood called West Wood on the Ordinance Survey maps of 1805 and 1876 (earlier Westwood 1551). A surprising omission since the poor road infrastructure south of the Thames  was one of the major issues in earlier consultations, and could be seen as the reason that the previous Thames Gateway Bridge scheme was cancelled. They are useless for anyone trying to work out how traffic flows will change in the future.
Compared to the map in the London Borough of Newham’s report on the Economic Impact of Gallions Reach Crossings it seems to show lower flows through residential roads in Plumstead and Bexley. The results should not be taken as a definitive forecast of future flows, especially on minor roads or at individual junctions.


I wonder where all the traffic that currently crosses the river on the Woolwich Free Ferry goes to? Otherwise the additional traffic generated by the new crossing will overload local residential roads leading to pressure for new roads and a renewed threat to our heritage ancient woodland. As far as TfL is concerned the Silvertown Tunnel is going ahead so they felt it would be wrong to not include it in the traffic models, and they expect it to be complete before any of the other crossings. With the red bricks on your left, turn right shortly after the gardens and head through the woodland to the top of Oxleas Meadows. If you have a complaint about the editorial content which relates to inaccuracy or intrusion, then please contact the editor here. It's part of the South London Green Chain Walk, and both a designated nature reserve and Site of Scientific Special Interest, but is mainly of interest for its woodland walks, winter tobogganing and autumn blackberrying opportunities, and most famously for the cafe perched at the top of its central grassy meadow – the perfect place for a big breakfast after a crisp winter walk with the dog.
A snippet of the results, which was also published on the No to Gallions campaign web site, is shown below.
A similar level was detected down in Woolwich at the junction of John Wilson Street and Wellington Street, close to Mulgrave Primary School.
A better comparison might be the difference in public transport, such as the tube, between north-west and south-east London. Without rail links they’d be a disaster for east London for more on the history of east London river crossings, how other modern European cities have tackled the problem of congestion and the recurrent fears that a motorway will be built through Plumstead, Woodlands Farm and Oxleas Wood.
We will explain how you can take part in the examination when we write again, later this spring. As TfL have previously accepted that the road infrastructure south of the Thames is not adequate to serve the proposed new crossings this seems to be an essential question for them to answer. Not the change from today’s traffic flows to those after the proposed crossings are developed. Population is expected to increase more rapidly in east and south east London than in other sub-regions. They also assume that the Woolwich Free Ferry will be charged, as would the Blackwall, Silvertown, Gallions Reach and Belvedere Crossings. There is lots of red showing big increases from the A2 over towards Gallions Reach and Belvedere, affecting Upper Wickham Lane, Lodge Hill, Okehampton Crescent, Brampton Road and Knee Hill (yet again). These are residential roads, not suitable to be used as a through route, with speed bumps, and a 20mph limit along Plum Lane.  Very often the traffic is single file due to parking on either side of the road. Opinion has hardened in favour of a Gallions Reach bridge and against the Free Ferry since the previous consultation in 2013: a Gallions bridge or tunnel  had the support of 71% and the Free Ferry 51% in that consultation. You would almost think that TfL were trying to present a particular point of view rather than impartially report on the results.
The second response is that they think most non-local traffic will use the tunnels at Blackwall and Silvertown and not the new bridge because the tunnels have better links on the other side of the river. There will be provision for pedestrians and cyclists to use the bridge, and they are considering whether it should carry the DLR over the river to Thamesmead and Abbey Wood. It was as grand inside as out, as shown in the set of photographs in the London Metropolitan Archive. The legacy proved a nightmare for the legatee, for as soon as the Earl died, the Crown Office afixed a ground rent of ?400 per annum on the property and she had no means of paying it.
The burial in non-consecrated ground shocked the neighbourhood, and one resident said they could smell the emanation of sulphurous gases. This painting may include the Baroness’s daughter Liliane, usually called Baba, who  later became Princess de Faucigny Lucinge.
The licence committee notes in the London Metropolitan Archive say that it was proposed  to use Falconwood as a private hotel. Not only is it not in place, but its construction is not even part of the current consultation: there will be a separate consultation later about Silvertown.
Also the models do not yet assume any mitigation measures that might be introduced such as changes to junction capacities or new traffic calming measures. Of course if there were no Silvertown Tunnel, I was told, traffic flows over the other crossings would be significantly higher. There are no current plans for improved road infrastructure South of the Thames, and I was advised to express my concerns in the consultation.
This is illustrated by the tube map variation from Geofftech, shown above, which reflects the tube map across to the south-east. The charges would be the same as for the Dartford Tunnel at peak times and half that rate at other times. The 40 µg m-? is shown in yellow on the map, with higher concentrations in deeper shades of orange and red.
These were taken in 1955 not that long before its demolition, and depict its elegant drawing rooms and a magnificent double-branched curved staircase as well as the boarded up exterior. When his wife died (about 1880) she was buried under the lawn at mid-night by Lord Truro and his gardener Mr. They didn’t feel it was dishonest not to include the results of modelling without Silvertown. There’s 106 of them, which can be avoided by turning left into Maryon Road, right along it then right up Woodland Terrace. If we were as well served as the other side of London we would have tube stations at the Rotunda, Woolwich Common, Shrewsbury Park and Plumstead Gardens, and the tube network would stretch as far as Tunbridge Wells. And at the bottom there’s that narrow one way stretch of Plum Lane, making traffic going down the hill turn left and then right along Kirk Lane to get through to Plumstead Common Road.
As well as the major roads, there are high levels along Shrewsbury Lane and down Eglinton Hill, Sandy Hill Road, Burrage Road, Plumstead Common Road and Swingate Lane.
There will be two more consultations about the Silvertown Tunnel, but they would not be about whether it was built but how. The very sharp turning between Plum Lane and Plumstead Common Road doesn’t exist as far as TfL are concerned. The grave was surrounded by some beautiful wrought iron work, but after Lord Truro’s death in Italy this was removed and nobody knows now exactly where the grave is. The area was notorious for highwaymen from at least the 14th century up until the 19th century. Henry IV had the woods along the road of Shooters Hill cleared as protection for travellers. This may be the origin of the name Shooters Hill, although it is also suggested it may refer to its use for archery practice in Henry VIII's reign, or be derived from two Old English words 'shaw' meaning a wood and 'tot' meaning a hill. In 1755, he successfully captured a private fortress on the island of Severndroog, off the coast of Malabar, in the Indian Ocean, and the Castle is named in memory of his victory.It is a tall triangular tower, designed to stand on top of the hill, and give spectacular views in every direction.



Wooden pallet furniture plans uk
Wood engraving ideas husband


Comments to “Oxleas wood management plan”

  1. BLaCk_DeViL_666 writes:
    Tom McLaughlin of Epic Woodworking and.
  2. 8km_yek writes:
    My only grievance is that I don't plans for a fundamental but very challenge your expertise and.
  3. VIP writes:
    Clubbed collectively for phenomenon results government sectors in London and intarsia.
  4. ESSE writes:
    Wooden or getting pretty near the ship ram.
  5. gizli_sevgi writes:
    The opportunity to observe their abilities with.