Woodworking plans bath vanity ideas,blueprint furniture hours,building archery bows with pvc pipe joint,plywood cabinet making jobs - PDF Review

13.06.2014
Place the bottom shelf as shown above between the sides, either using the Kreg Jig or countersunk screws or 2″ finish nails and wood glue. This project is held together with #20 biscuits, so mark their locations and cut slots for them. This is the step in which things have to go smoothly, or there’s a big mess to deal with. Next, apply glue to the slots in the other side and the slots in the other ends of the shelves.
Sand the panels and the inside edges of the frames with 120-grit sandpaper, then dry-fit the door parts to make sure they come together properly.
The easiest way to fit the doors is to lay the cabinet on its back, and then place the doors in position. Once the doors are hung, final fitting is done with a sharp block plane to create an even gap around the doors, and to make sure the two doors don’t collide with each other in the centre. I bought some V-groove, knotty pine panelling for the back slats, the kind that comes shrink-wrapped at building-supply outlets everywhere. It takes about five feet of crown moulding to cover the top of the project, and I installed it a little differently than the usual method. Drill and install your drawer and door hardware, then give everything a final sanding before cleaning up the shop and getting out the finishing supplies. I chose to stain this cabinet with the old classic, Minwax Puritan Pine, followed by one coat of Minwax Wipe-On Poly. Bathroom vanity plan, a satisfying reward A lot of sites focus on providing various bathroom vanity plans for homeowners to build themselves. DIY Plans – Kitchen Cabinets Plan and Home Remodeling Plans DIY Home Remodeling Plans. Cut these parts to rough size, leaving two or three inches of extra length before dressing them to finished thickness. Before you begin, check that both sides are exactly the same length and that you have the front edge of each side clearly identified. This last mark locates the bottom edge of the bottom shelf, leaving 30″ to the bottom of the sides. Rout from the top down to the middle of the bottom shelf position, the place where the back slats stop. Having just dry-fitted and labelled all the parts, make sure you have the necessary clamps on hand, pre-adjusted.


Butter up more biscuits to fill these slots, nestle the second side in place, and then clamp everything together while making sure that the back edges of the shelves line up correctly with the sides.
Since this groove is made to accept the door panels, you may need to tweak the dado width depending on the stock you’re using. This is a great time to prefinish the panels so they don’t show any unfinished areas if dry weather causes them to shrink. Start by sanding the crown by hand with 180-grit paper to get rid of the mill glaze and planer marks, then cut a triangular filler piece for behind the crown.
You can ask the lumber store to make the cuts for you, and your plywood will be easier to transport and store.
The best hinges I’ve found for doors like these (full overlay) are these ones from the Home Depot. When wood filler is completely dry, sand the project in the direction of the wood grain with 120 grit sandpaper.
Scribe a line across both sides with a square, then mark an X on the upward side of this line to show where the shelf will land.
Again, mark another X on the upward side of this line, also making note that the narrow shelf is set back one inch from the front edges of the sides to make room for the doors.
This dimension allows the cabinet to straddle most toilets, but if any adjustments need to be made to accommodate an unusual toilet height, make the changes now.
Instead, hold the shelf in place against the sides and make one continuous pencil mark across both side pieces. Fit shelves onto the biscuits and dry-assemble the entire framework with the help of some clamps. When everything you need is within reach, apply glue to all the slots in one side and the corresponding slots in the shelf ends.
Don’t worry about alignment of the front shelf edges for now, since everything can be made flush here after the glue dries. When you’re ready for final door assembly, apply glue to the stub tenons and also to the corresponding grooves in the stiles. I like to use one board for both drawer fronts so the grain pattern is continuous across them.
You’ll almost certainly need to make adjustments, and a sharp hand plane is the tool of choice for this job. This creates an attractive, low-lustre finish, while offering plenty of moisture protection that will stand up well in the bathroom.


Tweak the distance between the doors and the drawers, or upper and lower middle shelves as needed.
Check and adjust the framework for square, then install the central drawer divider with glue and a few small finishing nails. Cut, glue and nail the filler in place, flush with the tops of the sides, and then prepare the crown. Plywood panels can fit tight all around because they’re immune to moderate humidity changes. You must avoid getting glue on the panels since it could interfere with seasonal movement and cause cracking. As with the drawer fronts, cut the crown from a continuous piece of wood so grain patterns wrap around the project. Instead, angle these back 1? from square, so the front edge of each side is slightly longer than the back. Clamp each door immediately after assembly and check to make sure that the corners are square and flat. You’ll get the best results if you leave the side pieces of crown longer than needed for now, then get the mitre joints right before trimming to final length at the back ends.
It is always recommended to apply a test coat on a hidden area or scrap piece to ensure color evenness and adhesion. Cut the drawer bottoms and dry-fit all drawer parts to highlight any areas that need adjustment. Measure the distance between the two shelves and cut this piece with the grain running the same way as that on the sides. Take apart the framework and sand all the interior surfaces with a 120-grit abrasive in preparation for final glue-up. A belt sander is an excellent tool for adjusting final drawer size for a smooth-sliding fit within the openings.



Plans for wood gate hinges
Office desk ideas ikea onlineshop


Comments to “Woodworking plans bath vanity ideas”

  1. Gruzinicka writes:
    Assist Woodworking for Mere Mortals dwelling, create a properly-lit.
  2. 8899 writes:
    Mass-produce and reproduce products, quicker, with much less waste sample library or advice wizard and philanthropy.
  3. SONIC writes:
    Steps as doing calculations, drawing, copying.