Diane Thodos is an artist and art critic and was a student of Donald Kuspit at the School of Visual Arts in New York City from 1987 to 1992. DK: I think ita€™s over for a lot of those people and one of the things I see happening is a return to tradition in a variety of ways (without mimicking it). DT: Regarding the postmodern problem I remember you once raised the question in class about why is it artists dona€™t allow themselves to go back to being influenced by a tradition. DT: And at this point when you think of the incredible diversity that occurred (I remember you talking about the a€?Big Banga€? of Modernist creativity at the beginning of the last century around 1905 a€“ 24) we still have these rich aesthetic Modernist traditions that have barely scratched the surface of their possibilities in a sense.
DK: They probably do have emotions in their lives a€“ I dona€™t see how they couldna€™t a€“ but they split it off and deal with a€?official a€? issues of art. DT: You have often written about the exclusion of experiential depth in the great morass of conceptual art that dominates todaya€™s art world. DK: Well, as you know certain groups a€“ for example October most notoriously - have attacked humanism quite explicitly. DT: Yes - referring to the title of the book written by Jacques Ellul The Technological Society. DT: Yes - they are playing video games all the time, they are on the cell phone all the time, or constantly texting. DT: Like what Picabia was talking about when he had his Orphic ideas in painting and then transformed them into the Dadaist idea of the machine?
DK: Most subtle, and the most complicated organ apparently ever created by nature from what I have read. I feel this writing reflects a historical a€?revisiona€? of Muncha€™s work that intends to desublimate the power of his work by making him into an everyday huckster. DT: This brings me to the question a€“ do we have historical revisionism today thata€™s working as a means of not merely avoiding the presence of emotion in art, but being destructive of the importance of emotional sublimation in art? DK: What I would say has happened is the avant-garde a€“ avant gardism - has become institutionalized. DT: He was part of the Modernist movement even though he was complicit in horrible atrocities. DT: In the Leni Riefenstahl film Triumph of the Will it is interesting how rigidly the soldiers march in tight box formations. DT: And that hea€™s a hustler, that we are all the same, and that this is an everyday kind of thing.
DT: Do you see shades of George Orwella€™s book 1984 when the Whitney Museum claims there is great diversity in art when there is just the opposite.
DK: I am telling you he is getting the award this year - or why is Bruce Nauman in the Whitney Biennale?
DT: Getting into a big subject here - on your suggestion I have read Jacques Ellula€™s book The Technological Society [first published in 1964] and was struck by his prophetic insight about the present.
DK: Not only do you get more and more efficient, is shuts out what you call the a€?dark areaa€? - it shuts out emotion, because emotion is inefficient.
DT: Ita€™s not like watching an Andre Tarkovsky film where you get this incredible Dostoyevskian poetic depth. DK: Ita€™s very interesting to see this a€“ the sets, the clothing, the environments they create - this Americana scene. DK: When people talk about Americanization they are talking about standardization with a vengeance. DT: Do you feel, in reference to Jacque Ellula€™s book The Technological Society, that technique as an absolute standardization of means also relates to how artists have become these sort of glorified commercial producers of brand name products: in other words formatting the product to streamline the marketing system? DK: Yes a€“ but remember when there used to be the Soho Guggenheim that was at the corner of Prince Street and West Broadway?
DK: I dona€™t think they do this anymore, but the shoes are brought out every morning and exhibited like precious objects. DT: Is marketing as you see it a€“ the way this American Capitalist marketing system operates a€“ part of the efficiency of technique in a sense?
DK: Unless you want to have success for five minutes after getting out of the program - ita€™s shorter than 15 minutes these days.
DT: Conceptualism wants to create ita€™s own self-fulfilling propaganda and have no dialectical relationship outside of that? DK: He just stuck with it and made this special amalgamation of expressionism and the figure a€“ but he had the strength of will to do that. DT: So you need the strength of will to separate yourself from the things that do not give you the diversity of experience you need?
DK: And there is the argument that Harold Rosenberg made in relation to Arshile Gorky, that his apprenticeship was good a€“ Picasso to Miro a€“ and his work was quite different from theirs, derivative but an interesting derivation at that.
DT: Getting back to the issue of exclusion and censorship I remember once you talked about a€“ and I think ita€™s absolutely true a€“ in the late 80a€™s how women were starting to enter the art world more and more but their work was very novelty oriented in the neo-conceptual art mode. DK: It has been a lucky experience that I have met women artists in their 60a€™s who have been working for years and who I think are making pretty profound art. DT: That is a very important point because their schooling would have dated from a time when you could learn techniques. DK: What these artists have is also a persistent curiosity about learning and are knowledgeable about many other things. DT: So ita€™s like the stream of life is the effective force that brings the art along, as witness to it. DT: When I was a student here in New York at School of Visual Arts from 1987 a€“ 1989, one thing that confused me tremendously was how trends occurred in the art world. DT: I was in New York from 1987 a€“ 1992 starting with two years graduate school when you were my teacher. DK: Whatever you may think of Thatcher, Saatchi understood the connection of art and advertising in a way that even Warhol didna€™t a€“ the connection of art and publicity.


DK:A  And art openings have an atmosphere a little different than if we met in a boardroom or a restaurant where we would eat, chat, or make our deal. DT:A  Everything is getting extremely distended and abstracted from any meaningfulness in terms of what is sold and what the art actually is. Now in America the art may have to do with some sense of Puritanism - a sense of shame about a€?letting it all hang outa€? unless of course you got a TV camera in front of you. DT:A  Knowable human content is easier to grasp that the sort of attenuation of abstraction into, if you will, more and more of a conceptual mode?
DT:A  He had draughtsmanship, he loved Soutine, and you could see the lushness of the color.
DT:A  I remember very clearly the day in class you described the difference between the erotic and the pornographic. DT:A  And also about how the Christian religion downgraded the body and split the body from the spirit, demonizing Eros.
DK:A  They talked about how there was uncertainty that was entering the art auctions.A  Whata€™s the relationship between this blob and one and a half million dollars? DK:A  From a New York perspective the money seems to veil the art a€“ to be the clothing of the art.
DT:A  This is the a€?technological societya€? where the media is in collusion with the promotion of this art. DK:A  Look at how thick it is with advertisements filled with current art images with nice color and all that a€“ so therea€™s marketing.
DK:A  All I can say is I know and respect those who know the money side and they say the whole thing is a Ponzi scheme.
DK:A  So you can look, leta€™s say, at our Hoover vacuum cleaner man and you can analyze that a€“ you can do a very interesting interpretation of what thata€™s all about. DT:A  Well now they will go see a kitsch skull by Damien Hirst and it will be just as sensational, which is really a sad thing. DK:A  Well, there is a wonderful thing - there is this Bonham Gallery and they are selling meteoritesa€¦. DK:A  I looked at this stuff and I said to myself this is a terrific expression of sculpturea€¦ha!
DT:A  What about what the artist Otto Dix experience in WWI expressed in his War Series prints?
DT: Another question- you had Theodore Adorno as your teacher and a very strong background in philosophy.A  Can you comment on how this enriched your approach to critical interpretation in a nutshell? DT:A  So in the Frankfurt School Adornoa€™s approach had a lot to do with dialectical thinking in philosophy and psychoanalysis. DT:A  It certainly is a voice which I find is distinctly different from your art criticism.A  How did your interest in writing this poetry develop and what were the motivating forces that brought it out in you? DK:A  Also some new things have been published on an online magazine, Per Contra, run by a wonderful literary person named Miriam Kotzin. DT:A  I am always intrigued that there are different parts of oneself that have different needs that somehow extend themselves into other forms and types of spaces.A  Was it the growing up with the Germanic tradition in poetry that began your motivation?A  Was it French Symbolist poetry? DT:A  It is remarkable to see that you can occupy different dimensions of space within writing.
DT:A  I enjoy the freedom that the poetry gives a€“ the emotional breath about it, the atmospheric breadth it has.
DT:A  Well, it takes sitting down and reading poetry too, and sometimes the spoken element is different from just reading the words. DK:A  This may not be what the official system loves, you may never get a museum show, but it will have its validity. DT:A  I have this internal environment that is absolutely jam pack filled with things that have to be created. A The Rijka€™s museum exhibit of Damien Hirsta€™s Skull is also an attempt to destroy the authentic art that was already there in the museum. A Originally he had set up his print shop Studio 17 in Paris where a lot of the avant-garde artists there came to print.
A I was very confused about how it operated - what was its modus operandi.A  By that time in the late 1980a€™s anti-art already had a very strong hold within the art world.
A I needed someone who could give me some real answers.A  I recall you had once criticized certain art of the 1980a€™s as being the equivalent of junk bonds. The problem, maybe, today because of both the society of the spectacle and because of the anti-art tendency anti- aesthetic tendency, is that ita€™s become confused. A Art is the certain moment when you reach an idea of the transvaluation of values, and the thing acquired a certain value.A  Now, whatever else is going on, say, with Mr. Ita€™s a dialectical integration of opposites and it carries forward into psychoanalytic thinking which is where a lot of Adornoa€™s ideas come from a€“ conflict theory. He fled France because of the invading German army during World War II.A  He had been producing pamphlets in his print shop on how to blow up German tanks. A Many came to Studio 17 to have contact with members of the European avant-garde who they revered. A I believe anyone could study there as long as you were a serious printmaker and you followed his instruction making the experimental test plate.A  At the time Hayter did not have a high profile status the way DeKooning and Pollock did. A A In todaya€™s art world do you see the work of Jeff Koons and those like him being similar to toxic assets - both financially and spiritually - to use a current terminology? THESE VERY SAME ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES, WHO HAVE SWORN TO PROTECT AND SERVE, OUR COUNTRY, AND CITIZENS ,ARE BUT SOME, OF THE CORRUPT,GREEDY TRAITORS .ENGAGED IN THE TYRANNY AND TORTURE.
The school district has moved to a biometric identification program, saying students will no longer have to use an ID card to buy lunch.A  BIOMETRICS TO TRACK YOUR KIDS!!!!!i»?i»?A TARGETED INDIVIDUALS, THE GREEDY CRIMINALS ARE NOW CONDONING THEIR TECH! Paul Weindling, history of medicine professor at Oxford Brookes University, describes his search for the lost victims of Nazi experiments.


The chairman of the board at ESL a€” then proprietor of the desert wasteland in Nevada known as a€?Area 51a€? a€” was William Perry, who would be appointed secretary of defense several years later.
EUCACH.ORG PanelIn a 2-hour wide-ranging Panel with Alfred Lambremont Webre on the Transhumanist Agenda, Magnus Olsson, Dr. Henning Witte, and Melanie Vritschan, three experts from the European Coalition Against Covert Harassment, revealed recent technological advances in human robotization and nano implant technologies, and an acceleration of what Melanie Vritschan characterized as a a€?global enslavement programa€?.Shift from electromagnetic to scalar wavesThese technologies have now shifted from electromagnetic wave to scalar waves and use super quantum computers in the quantum cloud to control a€?pipesa€? a reference to the brains of humans that have been taken over via DNA, via implants that can be breathed can breach the blood-brain barrier and then controlled via scalar waved on a super-grid. Eventually, such 'subvocal speech' systems could be used in spacesuits, in noisy places like airport towers to capture air-traffic controller commands, or even in traditional voice-recognition programs to increase accuracy, according to NASA scientists."What is analyzed is silent, or sub auditory, speech, such as when a person silently reads or talks to himself," said Chuck Jorgensen, a scientist whose team is developing silent, subvocal speech recognition at NASA Ames Research Center in California's Silicon Valley.
We numbered the columns and rows, and we could identify each letter with a pair of single-digit numbers," Jorgensen said. People in noisy conditions could use the system when privacy is needed, such as during telephone conversations on buses or trains, according to scientists."An expanded muscle-control system could help injured astronauts control machines. If an astronaut is suffering from muscle weakness due to a long stint in microgravity, the astronaut could send signals to software that would assist with landings on Mars or the Earth, for example," Jorgensen explained. These are processed to remove noise, and then we process them to see useful parts of the signals to show one word from another," Jorgensen said.After the signals are amplified, computer software 'reads' the signals to recognize each word and sound. Our Research and Development Division has been in contact with the Federal Bureau of Prisons, the California Department of Corrections, the Texas Department of Public Safety, and the Massachusetts Department of Correction to run limited trials of the 2020 neural chip implant. We have established representatives of our interests in both management and institutional level positions within these departments. Federal regulations do not yet permit testing of implants on prisoners, but we have entered nto contractual agreements with privatized health care professionals and specified correctional personnel to do limited testing of our products. We need, however, to expand our testing to research how effective the 2020 neural chip implant performs in those identified as the most aggressive in our society. In California, several prisoners were identified as members of the security threat group, EME, or Mexican Mafia. They were brought to the health services unit at Pelican Bay and tranquilized with advanced sedatives developed by our Cambridge,Massachussetts laboratories. The results of implants on 8 prisoners yielded the following results: a€?Implants served as surveillance monitoring device for threat group activity. However, during that period substantial data was gathered by our research and development team which suggests that the implants exceed expected results. One of the major concerns of Security and the R & D team was that the test subject would discover the chemial imbalance during the initial adjustment period and the test would have to be scurbbed. However, due to advanced technological developments in the sedatives administered, the 48 hour adjustment period can be attributed t prescription medication given to the test subjects after the implant procedure. One of the concerns raised by R & D was the cause of the bleeding and how to eliminate that problem. Unexplained bleeding might cause the subject to inquire further about his "routine" visit to the infirmary or health care facility. Security officials now know several strategies employed by the EME that facilitate the transmission of illegal drugs and weapons into their correctional facilities. One intelligence officier remarked that while they cannot use the informaiton that have in a court of law that they now know who to watch and what outside "connections" they have. The prison at Soledad is now considering transferring three subjects to Vacaville wher we have ongoing implant reserach.
Our technicians have promised that they can do three 2020 neural chip implants in less than an hour. Soledad officials hope to collect information from the trio to bring a 14 month investigation into drug trafficking by correctional officers to a close.
Essentially, the implants make the unsuspecting prisoner a walking-talking recorder of every event he comes into contact with.
There are only five intelligence officers and the Commisoner of Corrections who actually know the full scope of the implant testing. In Massachusetts, the Department of Corrections has already entered into high level discussion about releasing certain offenders to the community with the 2020 neural chip implants. Our people are not altogether against the idea, however, attorneys for Intelli-Connection have advised against implant technology outside strick control settings. While we have a strong lobby in the Congress and various state legislatures favoring our product, we must proceed with the utmost caution on uncontrolled use of the 2020 neural chip. If the chip were discovered in use not authorized by law and the procedure traced to us we could not endure for long the resulting publicity and liability payments. Massachusetts officials have developed an intelligence branch from their Fugitive Task Force Squad that would do limited test runs under tight controls with the pre-release subjects.
Correctons officials have dubbed these poetnetial test subjects "the insurance group." (the name derives from the concept that the 2020 implant insures compliance with the law and allows officials to detect misconduct or violations without question) A retired police detective from Charlestown, Massachusetts, now with the intelligence unit has asked us to consider using the 2020 neural chip on hard core felons suspected of bank and armored car robbery. He stated, "Charlestown would never be the same, we'd finally know what was happening before they knew what was happening." We will continue to explore community uses of the 2020 chip, but our company rep will be attached to all law enforcement operations with an extraction crrew that can be on-site in 2 hours from anywhere at anytime.
We have an Intelli-Connection discussion group who is meeting with the Director of Security at Florence, Colorado's federal super maximum security unit. The initial discussions with the Director have been promising and we hope to have an R & D unit at this important facilitly within the next six months. Napolitano insisted that the department was not planning on engaging in any form of ideological profiling. I will tell him face-to-face that we honor veterans at DHS and employ thousands across the department, up to and including the Deputy Secretary," Ms. Steve Buyer of Indiana, the ranking Republican on the House Committee on Veterans' Affairs, called it "inconceivable" that the Obama administration would categorize veterans as a potential threat.



Mobile phone track on map
Yellow pages phone book dubai connect
Google maps cell phone search engines


Comments to Cell phone theft in chicago

karabagli

03.10.2014 at 20:20:24

Would do if I have of the constitution may possibly have different.

LADY

03.10.2014 at 23:44:37

There is a fee charged service for telephone the fact I've had that experience myself. Your telephone.