Probably the most important information from a Facebook user perspective is the integration of a user's address and mobile phone number as part of the User Graph object. If a Facebook app requests the information they are displayed on the request for permission prompt. Users who allow access basically hand over their address and mobile phone number, if they have added the data to their Facebook account.
Active Facebook users see those prompts on a regular basis, and it is likely that the majority clicks on the Allow button without reading the permission request first to play the game or access the app. Rogue apps can exploit the issue to gather addresses and phone numbers next to basic information such as the user's name. Users who play games or use apps may want to consider changing or removing mobile phone and address information from Facebook. Considering that the information are sensitive, it would have been better if Facebook would have added an option to request the data manually from the user instead.
Martin Brinkmann is a journalist from Germany who founded Ghacks Technology News Back in 2005. User may wish to consider the wisdom of ever putting that kind of information on Facebook in the first place.
I found this post by googling for a method of doing this, basically allowing a user to click a link, or an opt-in checkbox and then allow the mobile web page (ideally) or app page to grab this info.
I doubt it would be trigger-able or available via the mobile web page in the device's browser, but I wonder how it works. Just because you mark some of your Facebook data as private doesn't mean that you're hard to track down. Some of the tech dates back over 50 years and there's no indication of it being replaced anytime soon. People who are searching for the contact details of Hyderabad based corporate office of Facebook India.
Security is one tough business, as it seems like every day brings a new flaw or vulnerability. Reza Moaiandin, the technical director at the Salt Agency, discovered a flaw with Facebook that could allow hackers to figure out your phone number, even when it’s set to private. If we wrote a script and used Facebook’s API, we could have millions of phone numbers within minutes.
Facebook has an additional setting that allows anyone to search for you based on your phone number or your email address, and it’s set to Public by default.
The problem arises because a hacker can write a simple script with millions of phone numbers following a pattern for a certain area.


To prove Moaiandin’s finding, we typed in a few phone numbers of non-friends in the Facebook search box, and bingo, the name of the person, location, and profile photo appeared for each number just like if we had typed their name.
Moaiandin is advising Facebook to simply limit the amount of requests per user and detect patterns. He first contacted Facebook in April 2015 with his findings, but the first engineer didn’t understand the issue.
We contacted Reza Moaiandin and can confirm that if you follow the steps outlined below from either a desktop or a smartphone, your phone number will not be visible to hackers trying to use a script, or any random person who happens to enter it in the Facebook search field.
Open Facebook in your browser, click on the upside down triangle at the top right, and select Settings. Select Who can look me up using the phone number you provided? and change it to Friends of Friends or just Friends. You will also notice an option for Who can look me up using the email address you provided? You can change this as well if you would like, but it’s a lot more difficult for a hacker to create a script of email patterns based on their complexities. In the Facebook app, tap on the hamburger icon (three lines) at the top right and find Account Settings.
Select Who can look me up using the phone number you provided? and change it to Friends of Friends or just Friends.
You will also notice an option for Who can look me up using the email address you provided? You can change this if you would like, but it’s a lot more difficult for a hacker to create a script of email patterns based on their complexities. A recent blog posting over at Facebook by Jeff Bowen outlines some of the platform updates for developers.
It basically means that application developers can now request permission to access the user's contact information on Facebook. With those information available spammers could send personalized SMS spam messages, phishing SMS or use the information for Identity Theft.
Those who do not play games or apps do not need to change anything as it is currently not possible to request permission to access the address and mobile phone number of friends currently.
A simple prompt asking the user to enter the mobile phone number or address would certainly be more acceptable to the majority of users.
He is passionate about all things tech and knows the Internet and computers like the back of his hand. It has since then become one of the most popular tech news sites on the Internet with five authors and regular contributions from freelance writers. Software engineer Reza Moaiandin has learned that it's possible to scoop up the public details of legions of Facebook users simply by guessing phone numbers with a random number generator. Facebook tells The Guardian that it has "network monitoring tools" running to watch for suspicious data activity, and its developer kit rules limit just how (and how often) apps can scrape information.


If you think that setting your phone number to private will stop it from showing in search results, think again.
This means that anyone (friend or non-friend) entering your phone number in the Facebook search box will get information such as your name, location, and profile picture. Of course, this method would be super slow since you would have to enter in each possible phone number, but it proves the flaw exists.
After waiting a bit, Moaiandin notified the company again last month, and one engineer replied with, “Thanks for writing in. The announcement is technical and most users have probably skipped it altogether, if they did find it in the first place that is. It would have the additional benefit of making the Facebook user aware of the request since it would mean that the user had to enter data in a form manually.
You see, the social network defaults to letting anyone search for you using your phone number, even if it's unlisted -- as there's no search limit, all it takes is a script to harvest the user IDs for thousands of people. The company could theoretically cut off access to an app if it grabs too many profiles too quickly. Setting your phone number as private only stops it from appearing in your personal profile when non-friends are viewing it. That’s OK if the person actually knows your number, because they are most likely an acquaintance, a personal friend, or a family member. If we wrote a script and used Facebook’s API, we could have millions of phone numbers along with who they belonged to within minutes. As you can imagine, there's a real worry that this will not only let black market dealers and hackers collect targets en masse, but help them get numbers to use for phone-oriented attacks and spying. The concern is that Facebook isn't explicitly tackling this problem by instituting firm caps on data collection. Note that the rate limits may be higher than the rate you’re sending to our servers, therefore you do not appear to be blocked.
Even if it's not possible to circumvent the developer rules, nosy intruders might get lots of information before Facebook cuts them off. The reason behind it is the increasing number of members and account holders on the website.



How to block your cell phone number from telemarketers
Know my pan number status
Best cell phone 2014 battery review


Comments to How to find phone number from facebook messenger facebook

JUSTICE

29.08.2014 at 16:12:46

Underestimate the extremes a criminal will.

Kamilla_15

29.08.2014 at 23:27:26

And you idiots it is such characteristics that members History And Meet Any.