How to get your music onto itunes for free

Doc love dating tips for guys

RSS  RSS

Finding a younger woman,how to cope with a sudden break up,how to get your ex boyfriend back in love with you ub40,i need a woman mcfly mp3 juice - Reviews

A British study of gangs reveals that many are recruiting new members at younger and younger ages. An official report released by England’s Department for Children, Schools and Families has stated that kids are joining gangs at a progressively younger ages, sometimes even at 7 or 8 years old, according to The Daily Telegraph. Sudhir Venkatesh hung with a Chicago street gang for years to complete his graduate research.
A number of factors can influence whether a kid joins a gang, according to the Violence Prevention Institute. If you are like me, some of your best thoughts and ideas happen while riding in the car as a passenger and you are half asleep, or while you are in the shower.  Well, the other morning, while taking a shower, I was contemplating life and feeling a bit overwhelmed that enough time had passed by and I was turning 45 next month.  Seriously, when did that happen? I may not have been an honor’s math student, but basic math principals occurred to me after a few minutes and I realized it was not possible for me to turn 45 in 2015 since I was born in 1971. I AM NOT 44 ALREADY – I AM STILL 43!!!!!  I just got a whole year back people!  Seriously, for quite a few weeks, possibly even months, I had it in my head that I am already 44. It is no secret that I love the writing of Ashley and she nailed it with The Peanut Butter Game. My older daughter has started running track this year and I have been trying to figure out useful snacks for her to bring to the long meets.  I am thinking about trying this recipe to see what she thinks – cranberry orange date balls.
If you are still battling lots of toys on your floor, this storage box is the perfect compromise – still on the floor and accessible for the kiddos and contained and able to be tucked away for you.
When I bake, which lets be honest, is not very often, I love to find savory recipes.  This recipe for feta spinach muffins looks amazing. And while we are on the topic of savory spinach and feta recipes, this salad recipe is on the top of my list as well for quick dinners on the go.
Speaking of following, if you want pictures and updates of the “sugaring process”, we are just heading into the season.  Dana is sharing all things maple sugaring over on Twitter – you can find him at DPFindingHome.  He even shared his first “selfie”!
I have lots of fun stuff coming next week including some pictures from my sister’s wedding, a beautiful company (and discount code) to share with you and…okay, I don’t what else I will be sharing, but fingers crossed it is something you like! About Finding HomeWelcome to Finding Home where we share our favorite DIY and decorating ideas and inspiration. I have the opposite problem……I always think I am younger than I am and then when I realize it, it is a real bummer!
I have been doing that all the time for so many years I can’t pinpoint when I started doing it. A Happy Daycare - Summer Program    Summer Program 2013Get ready to explore your worldthis summer at A Happy Daycare.This Summer at A Happy Daycare we will pretend to ride along with the Magic School Bus into a world of adventure.
Edgy, Sexy and Dramatic Bang My bang style is best if you want to add a little sass,” Jeannie says. If you want to get one of these looks without making a long-term commitment, try clip-on extensions.
To understand ourselves it is important to understand our ancestors, and a part of them, and their heritage, lives on in us today. To the world the American Indians seemed like a forgotten people when the English colonists first arrived and began to occupy their lands. I want to give special thanks to my cousin, Mary Hilliard, for her assistance and encouragement in researching and preparing this book. Wherever possible I have tried to find at least two sources for the genealogical data, but this has not always been possible. I have also found Franklin Elewatum Bearce's history, Who Our Forefathers Really Were, A True Narrative of Our White and Indian Ancestors, to be very helpful. It is certainly possible that such a record may contain errors, but it is also very fortunate that we have access to this record as it presents firsthand knowledge of some of the individuals discussed in this book.
8 Newcomba€? Cpt.
Sometime before the colonial period, the Iroquoian tribes began moving from the southern plains eastward across the Mississippi River and then northeasterly between the Appalachians and the Ohio River Valley, into the Great Lakes region, then through New York and down the St.
Though they were neighbors and had similar skin color, these two groups of Indians were as dissimilar as the French and the Germans in Europe. Federations, as well as the individual tribes, were fluid organizations to the extent that the sachem was supported as long as he had the strength to maintain his position. Belonging to a federation meant that an annual tribute had to be sent to support the great sachem and his household, warriors had to be sent if he called for a given number to go to war, and strictest obedience and fidelity was demanded.
Some of these federations had as many as thirty member tribes supporting their Great Sachem, although many of these tribes would be counted by more than one sachem, as any tribe that was forced to pay tribute was considered as part of that Great Sachem's federation. Any member of the society who dishonored himself, in anyway, was no longer worthy of the respect of his people.
When viewing the typical Indians of America, one would describe them as having a dark brown skin.
They wore relatively little clothing, especially in summer, although the women were usually somewhat more modest than the men.
The English resented the fact that the Indians wouldn't convert to Christianity as soon as the missionaries came among them. The various tribes of New England spoke basically the same language and could understand each other well. There are many words used commonly in our language today that were learned from these New England Indians: Squaw, wigwam, wampum, pow-wow, moccasin, papoose, etc. Today there is little doubt that prior to Columbus's voyage, the Norsemen sailed to the coast of North America early in the eleventh century.
We do not have a record of all of the European contact and influence on the Indians in the early years of exploration because the greatest exposure came from the early European fishermen and trappers who kept no records of their adventures, as opposed to the explorers. In 1524, Giovanni da Verrazano wrote the first known description of a continuous voyage up the eastern coast of North America. As the fur trade became increasingly more important to Europeans, they relied heavily on the Indians to do the trapping for them. Another problem with which the Indians had to contend was the White man's diseases for which they had no tolerance nor immunity. In the spring of 1606, Gorges sent Assacumet and Manida, as guides on a ship with Captain Henry Chalons, to New England to search for a site for a settlement. In 1614, Captain John Smith, who had already been involved in the colony at James Town, Virginia, was again commissioned to take two ships to New England in search of gold, whales or anything else of value. Dermer wanted to trade with the local Indians of the Wampanoag Federation and asked Squanto if he would guide them and be their interpreter. Derner was given safe passage through Wampanoag land by Massasoit and soon returned to his ship. When the Pilgrims left England in the Mayflower, their stated intent was to establish a settlement on the mouth of the Hudson River, at the site of present day New York City.
The Pilgrims returned to the Mayflower and, after many days of exploration, found a more suitable location.
On March 16, 1621 the Pilgrims were surprised by a tall Indian who walked boldly into the plantation crying out, "Welcome!
The Pilgrims gestured for Massasoit to join them in their fort but, he in turn, gestured for them to come to him. When the amenities were ended, the English brought out a treaty they had prepared in advance, which specified that the Wampanoags would be allies to the English in the event of war with any other peoples and that they would not harm one-another; and that when any Indians came to visit the plantation they would leave their weapons behind. After the ceremonies were ended, Governor Carver escorted Massasoit to the edge of the settlement and waited there for the safe return of Winslow. Part of Massasoit's willingness to make an alliance with the English must be credited to his weakened condition after suffering from the recent epidemics which left his followers at about half of the strength of his enemies, the Narragansetts. In June of 1621, about three months after the signing of the treaty, a young boy from the Colony was lost in the woods. When the English could not find the boy, Governor William Bradford, (who replaced John Carver, who died in April) sent to Massasoit for help in locating the boy. That summer Governor Bradford sent Edward Winslow and Stephen Hopkins, with Squanto, to Pokanoket (Massasoit's own tribe, on the peninsula where Bristol, R.I.
From this trip of Winslow's, we learn more about the daily life of the Indians in this area. Massasoit urged his guests to stay longer but they insisted they must return to Plymouth before the Sabbath. Less than a month following this visit, Massasoit sent Hobomock, a high ranking member of the Wampanoag Council, to Plymouth to act as his ambassador and to aid the Pilgrims in whatever way they needed. Hobomock and Squanto were surprised at what they heard, and quietly withdrew from the camp to Squanto's wigwam but were captured there before they could get to Plymouth. Although the Narragansetts and Wampanoags were historical enemies and continually feuding over land, they did not usually put hostages of high rank to death. Normally, treason was punishable by death and Massasoit would certainly have been justified in executing Corbitant for his part in the plot against him but, for some reason, Massasoit complete forgave him.
Their first harvest was not a large one but the Pilgrims were.happy to have anything at all. During the winter, a rivalry developed between Squanto and Hobomock, the two Indians who now lived continually at Plymouth.
According to the treaty he had signed with Plymouth, they were to turn over to him any Indians guilty of offense. In June and July, three ships arrived at Plymouth with occupants who expected to be taken in and cared for.
In the winter of 1622-23, Governor William Bradford made trips to the various Indian tribes around Cape Cod to buy food to keep the Pilgrims from starvation.
Next, Standish went to Cummaquid (Barnstable, MA.) where Iyanough was Sachem of the Mattachee Tribe.
Thinking that Massasoit was dead, they went instead to Pocasset, where they sought Corbitant who, they were sure, would succeed Massasoit as the next Great Sachem. Winslow describes their arrival, where the Indians had gathered so closely that it took some effort to get through the crowd to the Great Sachem.
Since the Pow-wow's medicine had not produced any results, Winslow asked permission to try to help the ailing Sachem.
Their second Thanksgiving was combined with the wedding celebration of Governor Bradford and Alice Southworth. Because of Massasoit's honored position, more was recorded of him than of other Indians of his time.
Massasoit most likely became Sachem of the Pokanokets, and Great Sachem of the Wampanoags, between 1605-1615. The second son of Massasoit was Pometacomet, (alias Pometacom, Metacom, Metacomet, Metacomo or Philip.) Philip was born in 1640, at least 16 years younger than Alexander. The third son, Sunconewhew, was sent by his Father to learn the white man's ways and to attend school at Harvard.
When his two oldest sons were old enough to marry, Massasoit made the arrangements for them to marry the two daughters of the highly regarded Corbitant, Sachem of the Pocasset tribe. The tribes of Cape Cod, Martha's Vineyard, Nantucket, as well as some of the Nipmuck tribes of central Massachusetts, looked to him for Military defense and leadership. Following the plagues of 1617, which reduced his nation so drastically and left his greatest enemy, the Narragansetts of Rhode Island, so unaffected, Massasoit was in a weakened position. In 1632, following a battle with the Narragansetts in which he regained the Island of Aquidneck, Massasoit changed his name to Ousamequin (Yellow feather) sometimes spelled Wassamegon, Oosamequen, Ussamequen. In 1637, the English waged an unprovoked war of extermination against the Pequot Federation of Connecticut, which shocked both the Wampanoags and the Narragansetts so much that both Nations wanted to avoid hostilities with the feared English.
After hearing of the death of his good friend, Edward Winslow in 1655, Massasoit realized that his generation was passing away. As Massasoit's health began to decline, he turned more and more of the responsibilities over to Alexander who was a very capable leader and who was already leading the warriors on expedition against some of their enemies. Massasoit was succeeded, as Great Sachem, by his son Alexander, assisted by his brother, Philip. The younger generation saw, in Alexander, a strong, new leader who could see the danger of catering to the English. Both Philip and Weetamoo were very vocal in their condemnation of the English and word of their accusations soon reached Plymouth. Together, Philip and Canonchet reasoned that it would take a great deal of preparation for such a war.


In this segment, we will try to provide the information we have found for each of these children.
A search of the 1901 and 1911 Irish Census records did not produce any members of this Tinman family. Also, in the 1860 record of the Battlehill Methodist Church there was a Conway Tinman (Battlehill: A Local History, A Church History, by Valerie Ruddell and William Newell, Ruddell Press, Portadown, 2000 -- p.
The only known child of Sarah Lindsay Tinman was her daughter, Sarah Tinman who married William Hinton and was the a€?niecea€? that Alexander met while on his mission, as referred to above. It is clear that they had another daughter, born about 1908, after Alexander returned home from his mission, and she was therefore not mentioned in his journal. This is all that we have been able to find for Sarah Lindsaya€™s and her daughtera€™s families. This Bible is now in the possession of Wilson Glass, Grandnephew of Fannie Livingston Lindsay. With William being married in Jersey in 1859, he seems to have remained in the military for the next several years, and was probably still serving as a soldier at the time that his parents died--mother in 1865, and father in 1866. Eventually William, Alice and Alex returned home where they took up farming on their old home site.
In his role as a local farmer, and a leader in the Methodist Church at Battlehill, life continued until 20 Oct.
In the 1901 Irish census, we find William and a€?Fannya€? Lindsay, both listed as aged 62 and Methodists living in Ballintaggart (Richhill, Armagh). In the 1911 Irish census we find the same William and Fanny (ages 73 & 72) still listed as Methodists and still in Ballintaggart (Aghory, Armagh). Between these two dates, William was visited at their old home by his brother Alexander who made many references in his journal to their discussions, including a variety of religious conversations. While the brothers loved each other, it seems apparent that Alexander took his LDS mission very seriously and wanted to convince William of the truthfulness of the restored gospel.
William seems to have had two happy marriages, but was not blessed with children in either one.
She would have been about 25 years old when her father died in 1866, and so was old enough to be out on her own.
There is a lot of missing information about her and her family, but the two census records give us a great deal of help in filling in some of the gaps. Shortly after their marriage they were posted to India, which was a part of the British Empire at that time and had a fairly large contingent of British soldiers stationed there.
The family retuned from India about 1879, not long after Alexandera€™s departure for for New Zealand, and settled in County Armagh. In the 1901 Irish census we find this family living at house 8 in Union Street in Portadown, Armagh where they were all listed as Methodists.
His journal contains a number of brief entries showing a warm conviviality and a joy to be reunited with his loved ones in his old home country.
Shortly after this experience Alexander was transfered to England and was only able to communicate with his family by mail thereafter. In the 1911 Irish census we find this family living in house 14 Union Street, Portadown, Armagh. In addition to the above information, there is a note that Mary Ann had been married for only 9 years; had born 5 children, 3 of whom were still living.
We do not know of Elizabeth or William ever marrying, and we do not know what became of little Sarah, but it is possible that she had a family of her own with descendants somewhere today.
Our family records indicated that Mary Ann died about 1910, but it is apparent from the 1911 census that she was still alive at that time. She was still a young woman at that time and one wonders what happened to end her life while just entering her prime. The three death dates always match, and in each one he says she was 31 years old when she died. In the 1860 roll for the members of the Battlehill Methodist Church, Dorothy Lindsaya€™s name appears as a member of the group that was led by her father, John Lindsay. Dorothy grew up in the Lindsay home in Ballintaggart on the Loughgall Road with her other siblings. Dorothya€™s marriage may have taken place while Alexander was away as a soldier in the British Army, but he married and returned to this area in time to know Dorothya€™s two little boys when they were very young. Early on, the Holmes family moved to the townland of Clonroot, which is immediately adjacent to, on the west side of, Battlehill, which is adjacent to, and on the west side of, Ballintaggart, so they were very close to the rest of the family.
Upon his return to Ireland as a missionary for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1904-5, Alexander Lindsay visited with his brother William, and his sister, Mary Ann, to get caught up on all the changes that had occurred while he was away in New Zealand, and in Oregon, over the past 26 years.
While he was surely saddened to miss most of his siblings, he did get a chance to rekindle some relationships with the next generation, including his nephew, William Holmes.
Shortly after this last visit with William Holmes, Alexander was transferred to England for the remainder of his mission. In the 1911 Irish census we find William still living alone in the 19th house enumerated in Clonroot, Kilmore Parish, Co. Although William Holmes was still single in the 1911 census, he did eventually marry on 3 March 1920, in Ahorey, Co., Armagh, Ireland to Margaret Edgar, the daughter of Thomas Edgar.
As has been mentioned several times already, Alex was the youngest of eight children born to John Lindsay and Mary Donaghy. After returning to Ireland, and probably with the discharge of William from the Army, Alexander then enlisted for his own tour. So, in the fall of 1878, with their baby just a few weeks old, Alex and Mary set sail on an old sailing vessel, which went south around the Cape of Good Hope in Africa, and then eastward to New Zealand. They Lindsays homesteaded land in their new country and from time to time traded up for larger tracts until they eventually bought 640 acres of land near Towai, Bay of Islands, on the North Island. In 1897 missionaries from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints came to this area and eventually the Lindsays were taught the gospel and were baptized into this church. After returning home to LaGrande, Alex and Mary had a wonderful life together watching their children grow up, marry and raise children of their own. From the eight children (four daughters and four sons) of John Lindsay and Mary Donaghy, they had about nineteen known grandchildren. In this segment, we will try to provide the information we have found for each of these children.A  Much of this information comes from Alexander Lindsaya€™s Journal which he kept when he returned to the place of his birth on a two years mission (1904-1906) for the LDS Church and will be referred to as a€?ALJa€? {The Alexander Lindsay Journals 1903-1906, transcribed by Larry E.
Sarah Lindsay--born 1837, was the oldest child of this family.A  She married Edward Tinman (date unknown but probably between 1860-64) {ALJ p. In the 1901 Irish census, we find William and a€?Fannya€? Lindsay, both listed as aged 62 and Methodists living in Ballintaggart (Richhill, Armagh).A A  In this census she said she too was born in Co. William seems to have had two happy marriages, but was not blessed with children in either one.A  He passed away on 30 Dec.
Mary Ann Lindsay--was born in 1841 (no actual date specified).A  At age 19 her name was listed as one of the members of the Battlehill Methodist Church, of which her father, John Lindsay, was then the Group Leader [Battlehill Church History p. In the 1901 Irish census we find this family living at house 8 in Union Street in Portadown, Armagh where they were all listed as Methodists.A  Mary Ann was listed as being a widowed house keeper, aged 60 and the three children between ages 18-22 with the two girls as a€?Drawer in Factorya€? and the son was a weaver. Click here to learn more about how people have gone undercover to break into crime syndicates.
A few possible cues are changes in appearance; the use of a new nickname, slang words or hand signals, and unexplained injuries and cash.
According to the Orange County Register in California, gang membership for kids under 14 has grown continually since 2002. Age is such an non-issue with me I have to take the year I was born and subtract from the current year.
We hook up this busy mom with our glam team to revive her appearance with a spring May-kover!
At first I was very skeptical of this record as it was a family tradition passed down for many generations.
She was very fond of her Grandmother, Freelove, knew all about her and stated on several occasions that Freelove's Mother was Sarah Mauwee, daughter of Joseph Mauwee, Sachem of Choosetown, and not Tabitha Rubbards (Roberts). Massasoit was the Sachem of this tribe, as well as being the Great Sachem over the entire Wampanoag Federation, which consisted of over 30 tribes in central and southeastern Massachusetts, Cape Cod, Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket.
Welcome, Englishmen!" It was a cold and windy day, yet this Indian, who introduced himself as Samoset, Sachem of a tribe in Monhegan Island, Maine, wore only moccasins and a fringed loin skin.
10, 1905 --This morn after dressing I went to meet my Niece [this would be Sarah Tinman Hinton, who was then living in Belfast, and was the daughter of Sarah Lindsay Tinman] at the 9 Oa€™c train and her two children, bringing them home to breakfast, and then went on to M.
9, 1905 -- Accompanied by Elder Scott I paid my promised visit to my new found Niece [Sarah Tinman Hinton]. 14 May 1905 -- This morning my companion and I went out as far as Clonroot to pay our promised visit to Willie Holmes. 11 June 1905 -- Another Saboth [sic] day, going out as far as Clonroot, and I may say we all spent a very enjoyable time. Keelya€? and had this girl--born about 1906.A  Remember too that Alexander referred to his niece as Mrs. If they are afraid of the place they live, or they are seeking protection from a rival gang, kids may turn to a gang for protection. I thought I was turning 35 until my younger brother pointed out that I was born in 1957 and this was 1991.
She obtained her copy of Zerviah Newcomb's Chronical from Zerviah's original diary, in the hands of Josiah 3rd himself.
1920.A  His widow, Fannie, continued to reside in the old Lindsay home until her passing on 7 Aug. 207].A A  She may have known him in her earlier years and may have married when he was on leave from the Army, as we believe he was a soldier. Nugent, and her two daughters, Lizzie and Sarah.A  Sarah was already married by this date, and she was the a€?Mrs. 10, 1905 -- This morning found all the Elders ready for Con[ference].A  Roy went and met Sis. Nugentsa€™s [Mary Ann Lindsay Nugent--another sister of Alexandar Lindsay who was then living in Portadown], talked some time and then proceeded out as far as Wma€™s [Alexa€™s older brother, William Lindsay] calling in on the way to see Mr. Little Eddie Hinton [age about 10] just alls in on me just now.A  Hea€™s on a visit to his Aunt Mrs. We will join the magic school bus on a few of it’s many adventures as it journeys to the bottom of the sea, goes back into the time of the dinosaurs, and explores the hidden world of bugs.
Bearce's Great-aunt, Mary Caroline, lived with Josiah III and Freelove Canfield Bearce for several years, listened to their ancestral stories, and made her own personal copy of Zerviah's diary supplement. Lawrence to what is now known as Lake Champlain where his party killed several Mohawks in a show of European strength and musketry. Tinman [Thomas Tinman--brother of Edward] and his daughter made me feel at home and asked me to call every time I could. Hinton asking me to bring Eddy with me to Belfast tomorrow, so I got supper and went out into the country to tell the folks, and they treated me fine and asked me to call as often as I passed. Tinman [Thomas Tinman--brother of Edward] and his daughter made me feel at home and asked me to call every time I could.A  {ALJ p. Elder Lindsay of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints and I may say that we had a spiritual feast.A  The Lord has greatly blessed me in all ways for which I am truly grateful. 1877, after living with her husband for 18 years, two months, and sixteen days, aged 36 yrs.
June 24-June 28 Ocean Explorer’s CampCome journey to the bottom of the sea as we explore the wonderful world of oceans and sea animals.Time Traveler’s Camp July 1-19July 1-5 A short stop in 1776 for America’s birthday. We will make American flags, have a parade, and celebrate America’s birthday with a delicious Apple Pie. The children will dress up like the Statue of Liberty for our infamous Statue of Liberty photos. He further told them that Massasoit, the Great Sachem of the Wampanoags, was at Nemasket (a distance of about 15 miles) with many of his Counselors. We then bid them good bye coming on with their invitation ringing in our ears to be sure and come again which we promised to do if possible. Our Statue of Liberty photos are so good one of the children’s  photos made it all the way to the office of a Supreme court judge.
Of course when you determine you are a year younger than you thought, it’s time to rejoice !!!


1848 date for her birth, which means that she would have been just past her 33 birthday at the time of her death on 14 Feb. Hewitt and family good bye, we started on our return to Portadown Accompanied part of the way by Mr.
July 22 - August 5 Science Explorer’s Camp We will enter the fascinating world of insects and go inside the human body. Willie Holmes my Sister Dolliea€™s Son, arriving here about 11 Oa€™c pretty tired but highly elated at the successful termination of my first meeting with the people of Conroot. A summer full of fun and imagination.   June 24-28, 2013This week the magic school bus stopped at it’s first destination, under the sea, to explore the ocean’s coral reefs and tidal zones.
We, Ocean Explorers, were along for the ride and what an adventure we had discovering the ocean and it’s many wonders.
You can’t be an ocean explorer without an ocean explorer’s guide to identify what you see in the great big blue sea. Ray’s Ocean Explorers’ Guide to the real animals that live in Nemo’s neighborhood, the Great Barrier Reef. Clownfish live in stinging anemones but the anemone’s tentacles don’t sting them because they are covered in a special slime. You cut 8 legs in the hot dog and when you place it into a pot of boiling water the tentacles curl all up. It is Movie Friday.  We watched Finding Nemo and made graceful jellyfish out of a colorful mosaic of tissue paper. Remember: We will be closed Thursday for the Fourth of July    July 8-12, 2013This week the Magic School Bus transported us back to the Prehistoric World of Dinosaurs and Reptiles and next week we will become Paleontologists in search of dinosaur bones and fossils. I wonder what mine will be?” The children were expectant dinosaur parents during our Hatch A Dinosaur science experiment.
They filled the glasses with warm water, placed the colorful egg capsules into the water, and eagerly waited for their dinosaur eggs to hatch.  They decided Catalina was the best Dinosaur Mother because her red egg hatched first and everyone gathered around to help Christopher hatch his blue egg which needed some extra help with the hatching process.
There was a little dino envy when Jaden’s hatched into a big red Iguanodon but they each loved their little hatchlings as only a parent could.  The children are wearing Dinosaur T-Rex hats through out the day for special Dinosaur story times and to practice their own reading skills. The children are continuing to learn to stay in their own seats or on their own letter on the alphabet rug until the school activity is complete.
He taught us the signs for the letter D, Dinosaur, the letter V and Volcano.  He even read us the book Harold and the Purple Crayon: Dinosaur Days in Sign language! Mia, a future teacher herself, shared a special photo book of all their adventures around the world.
Signing Time: A special sign language class with Thomas Cabaluna and a Dinosaur Story time in sign language.
New Sign language signs learned include the signs for dinosaur, volcano, and the letter signs D and V Movie Friday and Lunch: Disney’s Dinosaurs and Dinosaur shaped chicken nuggets. Math: Counting spots on the Triceratops, Skip counting, addition, and patterns with Leapfrog Math to the Moon. Art: Harold the Purple Crayon Art, Using stencils with paint, How to make a volcano and prehistoric landscape, and Sticker Art.
Prehistoric Play Dough Center: We discovered how to make and identify  dinosaur and lizard footprints in play dough. Pretend Play: We introduced new stegosaurus, and brontosaurus toys to our play and block area. The last two weeks the children have been busy discovering the exciting world of paleontology.
A paleontologist is a scientist who learns about prehistoric animals like dinosaurs by studying their fossils. Squeezing modeling clay with their hands they picked out  dinosaurs and pressed them as hard as they could into the clay making an imprint fossil. In this learning unit the children learned what a paleontologist does and the tools they use to discover fossils. So here at A Happy Daycare the children actually touched a real piece of a dinosaur bone and examined an ammonite shell fossil over 65 million years old. The children were very excited to discover that when you look through a Magnifying glass it make things huge!
The children measured and helped mix up the recipe in a big bucket to use to make treasure stones. They molded it into a rock shape  and we hid a treasure into each of their stones for them to dig out when the treasure stone harden.
On Friday we brought out more tools, brushes, and little shovels for the children to dig out their treasures. We read the book The Dinosaur Stomp and then stepped right on to the dinosaur stilts to see how it feels to stomp around with big dinosaur feet. The dinosaur feet stilts we used were only a few inches off the ground but when the children stood on them they  thought that they were bigger than life!  Dinosaur had bones and when you look at the shapes of their bones you can tell what kind of dinosaur it is. The children learned how to identify stegosaurus bones, t-rex bones, and long-neck dinosaur bones by using critical thinking and matching skills. We learned that even if you find a dinosaur skeleton you have to put it back together in the right order. We practiced our puzzle skills with mixed up t-rex flash cards and a plastic skeleton mold.
Dinosaurs have bones and so do we.   Next stop on the Magic School Bus Adventure is Inside the Human Body. Reading and Writing: We are practicing sight words, sounding out three letter words, and recognizing that print is a part of our daily lives. This fall Lindsay will be attending Kindergarten at a school in Prunedale and Jaden will be attending Kindergarten at a school in Monterey. Potato Head as a teaching tool for the children to visualize the body parts that make up the five senses.
The nose knows how to smell and we practiced using our sense of smell to explore the world around us by seeing how many things we could smell.
The children even put on silly glasses with big noses to go on a nature walk in the garden to smell the flowers. We have X-rays hanging up on the windows for the children to explore and discover how an X-ray takes a picture of bones. Potato Head Art, and my five senses chart  August 5-9, 2013Next week the Magic School Bus Science explorers will explore the wonderful world of bugs and butterflies. This week we joined the Magic School Bus as it magically shrank down in size to explore inside the human body! All the children thought it was hilarious that on the Magic School Bus Series the children have a friend named Ralphie in their class too. When we learned about community helpers and farmers we read about a rooster named Ralphie too.
Before we explored inside the human body the children laid on a big roll of paper to trace the shape of their own bodies! Seuss’s Horton Hears A Who is, “A person is a person no matter how small.” And it is true it doesn’t matter how big or how small a person is everyone has their own body with the same amazing bones and body organs inside. Their brain’s job is to think and learn, their heart’s job is to pump, their lung’s job is to breath in air, and their stomachs job is to help digest their food.
Now that everyone had made a tracing of their own unique outline the children were ready to paint and add  in  the different bones and organs, during the week, as we learned about them.
On Movie Friday we watched a Double Feature with Sid The Science Kid’s episode on the sense of smell and the Magic School Bus’s series Inside Ralphie.
Thanks to Irie and her mom for bringing the Movie Friday Snacks last week and this week.  The children’s sense of taste says the snacks are delicious!
This week the children explored the life cycle of butterflies with Eric Carle’s The Very Hungry Caterpillar. We practiced the days of the week and counted fruit right along with that wiggly lovable caterpillar. The caterpillar even helped us learn about placing in order from biggest to smallest with the wooden caterpillar stacking gameNoodles, noodles, and more noodles. Can you find the noodle type that looks like a curly caterpillar, little eggs, a cocoon and a butterfly taking flight. The hunt was on for the children to match the noodles to each butterfly stage and to find the most eggs.  They even selected special leaves and sticks from the garden for their noodle caterpillars. We harvested green, yellow, and purple organic beans from our Jack and the Beanstalk beans. Then we explored volume with water by transferring the water from one container to another. Thanks to Irie’s Mom for the Yummy Chocolate pudding with gummy worms and Gabriel’s Mom for the homemade muffins. Magic School Bus: Ants in his pants and Butterfly BogAugust 19-23, 2013This week we are finishing up the last of our summer program and preparing lesson plans for the new school year.
We have so many activities and lessons full of learning planned for the upcoming fall season! Please send your child to school in a yellow or black shirt for a day full of bee and bug themed activities. All summer the children have been exploring how to use a magnifier to enlarge objects and this week we introduced how a microscope works. We have a special microscope for young children that plugs directly into the TV screen so the entire class can see all at once.
We went on a nature hunt in the backyard to discover interesting leaves and bugs to look at under the microscope. Catalina, Cole, and Omari were the helpers who held the buckets full of their finds.  We placed them in a jar and used the microscope to enlarge them.
We could see the tiniest  caterpillar eggs on our sunflower leaf.  An ant looked like a monster and we didn’t even know that a roly-poly had that many legs. Each of the children helped pick out the color pattern of their caterpillar, pressed their painted little toes onto the wooden magnet, and tried not to wiggle their toes too much.   Then we added eyes and antennas. She even included an array of nutritious fruit for us and the cake caterpillar to eat just like in the story.
August 26-30, 2013This year we finished up our Summer Program with a Busy Bee Celebration Day.
The children came in on Wednesday dressed in yellow and black ready to be busy little bees. We had bobbling bee antennas on our heads to greet the children as they arrived at our “hive”.
Trinity had little bees on her dress, Jonathan had on his striped bumblebee shirt, and Irie even had bee barrettes in her hair.   What would the little bees eat for breakfast?
We learned that if you are going to be a bee then you have to build a hive to go home to.  The children worked together to help build a honeybee hive out of our many tunnels and tents. The “hive” ended up covering their whole play area and they had so much fun crawling in and out of the tunnels buzzing like worker bees. The children dressed up in the bee costumes to fly through the yard and gather pretend nectar from the garden to make their  honey.
Pretend play like this gives the children the opportunity to apply the learning and knowledge that they have gained. During Music and Movement Time we danced, jumped and learned how bees communicate to each other where the best flowers are by dancing. The children put on the headbands they made and we all marched through the garden in a buzzing bee parade. The children loved every minute of it.  A special thanks to Asher’s family for the delicious bee cupcakes they made.
Thanks to Irie’s family who worked so hard on making a beautiful honeybee hive filled with honeycomb treats to share.
Have a great holiday weekend and remember we will be closed Monday September 2 for Labor Day.



How to get my ex boyfriend back if he has a new girlfriend jessica
Get your man to fall back in love with you spell


Comments

  • Smert_Nik, 19.08.2014 at 22:34:48

    Find yourself making it nearly impossible so that you can get hi Joe.
  • KickBan, 19.08.2014 at 22:12:37

    Instagram but they take it off will help your.