How to get your music onto itunes for free

Doc love dating tips for guys

RSS  RSS

I want him back letters boyfriend,what to get your girlfriend for christmas in college of,how to get him back and keep him reviews,how to gain your boyfriends respect back relationship - For Begninners

We had both scored high on the ASVAB (Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery) test so it was only logical that we both become engineers.
In the spring of a€™69 I was in Austin for the State Solo & Ensemble competition and auditioned for The Longhorn Band with an assistant band director. At the UT freshman orientation week, we were told that over half of us would change majors at least once during our time at UT. DiNino came to UT from Minnesota in 1955 as the first faculty status Longhorn Band director.
The win at Arkansas earned the Longhorns another trip to the Cotton Bowl as undefeated champions of the Southwest Conference where their surprise opponent was none other than legendary Notre Dame, who had a history of shunning all bowl games. Besides the rehearsals, the bus trips, and the parties, there were also performances for concerts, basketball games, baseball games, and other special events. Directly or indirectly, everything we enjoyed about Longhorn Band we owed to Vincent DiNino. Fall 1968 was the beginning of our senior year.A  John and I visited Austin that summer and selected our dormitory for the next year. At the UT freshman orientation week, we were told that over half of us would change majors at least once during our time at UT.A  I was astounded by that statistic, consoled only by the fact that at least I would not be one of them! DiNino came to UT from Minnesota in 1955 as the first faculty status Longhorn Band director.A  He built the band from a 70-member all male musical ensemble into a 300+ member show band with swagger and pride. 1969 was the 100th anniversary of organized college football.A  Ohio State was the defending National Champs and expected to repeat, but when upset by bitter rival Michigan, UT took over #1. The win at Arkansas earned the Longhorns another trip to the Cotton Bowl as undefeated champions of the Southwest Conference where their surprise opponent was none other than legendary Notre Dame, who had a history of shunning all bowl games.A  This was Notre Damea€™s first bowl appearance since 1924.
Directly or indirectly, everything we enjoyed about Longhorn Band we owed to Vincent DiNino.A  Mr.
Written by Christopher Morleya€™s daughter Louise before her death in 2012, and brought out between covers now by her children, to the benefit of we who care about the founder of The Baker Street Irregulars! Leavitt still claimed in the 1960s that Fuller had been an early BSI, albeit one largely ignorant of the Canon (a€™Thirties, p.
But readers will learn a good deal from this book about Morley himself, and his Three Hours for Lunch Club preceding the BSI and giving it much of its early tone and personalities. Louise Morley Cochrane closes this lengthy letter by remarking: a€?The letter was not signed. Through the generosity of Christopher Music BSI, editor of the new Amateur Mendicant Society history From the Lower Vault (reviewed below by Donald Yates BSI), I have just read the late Russell McLauchlina€™s 1943 book Roaming Holidays: A Preface to Post-War Travel. McLauchlin, a Cornell man, became a lawyer after the World War, but instead pursued newspaper journalism as a career.
Of Sherlock Holmes in this book therea€™s next to nothing, but of Baker Street Irregularitya€™s spirit, there is more than a little. And a€?if I have any Anglo-Saxon blood at all, it is such a tiny drop that I do not know its origin. Alfred Street by McLauchlin, three years later (Detroit: Conjure House, 1946), does get very specific about Sherlock Holmes in one chapter. And when Starrett created The Hounds of the Baskerville (sic) in Chicago in the mid 1940s, Detroit heard the view-halloo as well. The paper, focusing on SCAN and the King of Bohemia in rhyme, was McLauchlina€™s hilariously titled a€?I Cana€™t Endorse This Czech,a€? which Edgar W. Alfred Street is where McLauchlin had grown up at the turn of the century, and the book is a superb picture of a certain era in American life. And in the chapter a€?Alfred Street and Baker Streeta€? we learn how McLauchina€™s devotion arose.
Not for worlds would I criticize that splendid society, being one of its most devout members. The young men, who lived on Alfred Street in this centurya€™s early years, held the faith as firmly as ever did Christopher Morley or Msgr. I knew a great deal about Sherlock Holmes, some years before I learned to read, and so did all my Alfred Street companions. So we used to clamor for stories of Sherlock Holmes and my father, a great enthusiast, was always happy to comply, often relying on his own powers of invention for thrilling plots of an impromptu nature. And something like that went on in every household where Colliera€™s was delivered by the postman. The second reason, of course, was William Gillette, whose appearance as Sherlock Holmes, from his play of that name, was familiar by this time, and carried forward by Frederic Dorr Steelea€™s illustrations of those Return stories in Colliera€™s Weekly. Few works in our literature capture as this book does the time and ethos of the early Irregulars as they first encountered, and learned to not only love, but study, the Sherlock Holmes stories. Reviewed by Jon Lellenberg, a€?Rodger Prescotta€? BSI, the conductor of this website and of the BSI Archival Histories.
It was in 1984, at the BSIa€™s 50th anniversary dinner, that Bliss gave a talk about the Murray Hill Hotel era that began my own and othersa€™ interest in the BSIa€™s history.
Bliss was a stellar collector and bibliographer, making him sometimes a compelling commentator on the Canona€™s creation and its creatora€™s life. Sonia Fetherston, the author of this biography, despite not knowing Bliss, has constructed an informative portrait, deeply researched and thoughtfully written. At the same time, Ia€™d love to know more about Blissa€™s first trip to London, when he was in his mid twenties. But these factors do not subtract from an exceptionally valuable contribution to BSI history.
In 1955, living in Dearborn, Michigan, just outside Detroit, I read a newspaper article about the Mendicants and soon was in touch with Russ McLauchlin. When I left the Detroit area in 1957 to accept a position in Michigan Statea€™s Department of Foreign Languages, I discovered that an early member of the Mendicants, Page Heldenbrand, had established a Holmes scion there that he had designated as the Greek Interpreters of East Lansing.
Inspired by the work of Jon Lellenberg (the BSIa€™s Thucydides), Music has just brought forth his From the Lower Vault, which draws upon the Donovan file and Harrisa€™s papers and reminiscences to give us a sense of how a Sherlockian society comes into being, and displays the sparkling wit of Russ McLauchlin and Bob Harris in its pages, where all of McLauchlina€™s high-spirited periodic dispatches to the membership (his Encyclical Letters) are reproduced.
A recent incarnation is Baker Street Irregular by Jon Lellenberg in which a leading Sherlockian scholar and retired senior Pentagon staff officer takes his young New York lawyer, Woody Hazelbaker, through the major events in American history from the early 1930s to 1947, focusing on the beginnings and course of World War II, with an emphasis on the ever-increasing efforts at espionage and counter-espionage and the personalities involved.
Now Lellenberg, having written an entertaining spy novel about the Baker Street Irregulars, takes a new approach (at least for this reader) by producing a a€?companion volumea€? to Baker Street Irregular, addressing the background of the events and personalities in the original story with commentary and notes, both personal and objective. One topic given special attention, for example, is the long-lastingA  effort on the part of many to enlist the aid of the United States for Great Britain at war with Hitler prior to Pearl Harbor.
One thing becomes very clear as one reads Sources and Methods a€” the author had a wonderful time writing this book.
Ambassador Ralph Earle II is a€?Joyce Cumings,a€? BSI, a veteran himself of the Defense and State Departments and of the diplomatic life, and a Washington D.C. For the student of BSI history, the personnel of Christopher Morleya€™s Three Hours for Lunch Club tend to divide into three categories: ones who went on to significant roles in the Baker Street Irregulars, such as Elmer Davis, W.
Yet Bill Footner deserves more attention than I, and I daresay you, have given him previously.
For this book, Christopher Morley penned a five plus page tribute to Footner, dated December 19th, 1944. By 1921, when the Three Hours for Lunch Club was being convened, Morley included Footner in this magic circle. Its protagonist is a member of The Three Hours for Lunch Club, at the time it had taken Hobokena€™s Old Rialto and Lyric Theatre to stage period melodrama like After Dark and The Black Crook, relying on Hobokena€™s reputation as a free-range speakeasy zone to help attract Manhattan audiences over, with fair success for a year or two. The Foundry is an old brick building of a pleasing quaintness of design, faintly German in flavor. The affairs of theA Three-Hours-for-Lunch Club and the Hoboken Theatrical Company were inextricably commingled, and the two organizations shared the Foundry between them.
The contrast of the elegant furniture with its rude surroundings tickled the fancy of the members.
Morley, however much he enjoyed Bill Footnera€™s mystery novels, had a realistic view of their limited place in the genre. Without trying to put it so picturesquely a€” who can compete with Christopher Morley in such a vein? For those interested in the BSIa€™s history, there are no surprise answers in New York, City of Cities, but it offers greater understanding of the setting in which the BSI was born. And so on, if Morley had cared to set readers an examination: the possibilities in the City of Cities were endless. It is a distinct pleasure, particularly in these dumbed-down days, to encounter a solid work of old-fashioned, literate, witty disputation in the Canon; or rather, to honor Sauvagea€™s insistence, the Conan. The manuscript of Sherlockian Heresies survived for many years as part of the paternal archive saved by the three Sauvage children, and a happy accident brought them into contact with the editors.
Sauvagea€™s critical strictures in Sherlockian Heresies are not nitpickings; this is not a chapter of faults, so to speak.
There is much more to challenge the engaged readera€™s beliefs and assumptions, and he takes serious issue with the findings of even the greatest among us in the past. Varian Fry was not just forthright and successful, he was such despite the direct opposition of the U.S. The Baring-Gould a€?editiona€? of his Annotated Sherlock Holmes is an offset-printed paste-up of various London: John Murray publications, and the texts reflect British usage as a result of this. George Fletcher is a€?The Cardboard Box,a€? BSI, and claims to have retired as director of Special Collections at the New York Public Library.
In this, the first decade of the 21st century, anyone who can connect to the worldwide web can be deluged a€” and paralyzed a€” by a flood of virtual news, information, misinformation, blogs, opinions, images etc., on nearly any conceivable topic.
Both the Senior Editor, Harry Thurston Peck, and the Junior Editor, Arthur Bartlett Maurice, of the American Bookman were obsessed with the doings of Sherlock Holmes. The result of the mania shared by Peck and Maurice was a devotion to tracking and commenting upon various strands of Sherlockiana, Doyleana, and numerous other detective appearances coeval to their publication. This is an excellent route to appreciating the growth and development of Sherlockian appreciation essentially from the beginning. Why, the a€?Editorial Adventure Storya€? by Trumbull White, in which he narrates his long quest to acquire a yet-to-be written manuscript co-authored by Conan Doyle and E.
Bret Hartea€™s first volume of Condensed Novels was entirely admirable, not quite so much may be said for the second.
As an antiquarian bookseller, I cannot but be painfully reminded of an incident nearly forty years ago. Meanwhile, other not-to-be-missed nuggets in this compilation include a very late (1927) article by Conan Doyle which relates to his interest in Spiritualism.
Last, but certainly not least, this reprints various contributions by Vincent Starrett in advance of his immediate classic The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes. It is difficult to imagine the state of Sherlockian studies or the history of the Baker Street Irregulars without thinking of Vincent Starrett. This collection begins with his earliest columns in the Chicago Daily News and continues when it moved to the Chicago Tribune.
The book is necessarily episodic, but nevertheless it is possible to read it straight through with pleasure as well as by dipping into it at random.
This is a book for anyone who enjoys reading Vincent Starrett, but it may also serve as a resource to events in the Sherlockian world between 1942 and 1967. A book that allows us to read something new by the Dean of Sherlockians (as Starrett was often called) is worth a place on our shelves. Our story for this Buck family begins with the marriage of Davida€™s parents, Thomas Buck and Elizabeth Scott, on 4 May 1738 in Glastonbury, Connecticut [see Glastonbury Vital Records by Barbour, available on the Internet.] The record of this marriage does not provide any additional information about the ancestry of Thomas Buck, but it does tell us that Elizabeth was the daughter of Thomas Scott.
We know that these were the parents of our David Buck as his daughter, Elizabeth Buck Garlick (who we will frequently refer to as a€?EBGa€?) left a record in 1841 (in Nauvoo, Illinois) and again in 1872 (in Salt Lake City in the Endowment House). Following their wedding in 1738, Thomas and Elizabeth Buck completely disappear from the local records. Fortunately their grand-daughter, Elizabeth Buck Garlick (EBG), lived long enough to be listed in the 1880 US Federal census for Springville, Utah.
The birth-dates are unknown for several of these children, but since there was such a large gap between Thomas, Jr. There was also a John Buck and a Joseph Buck who were closely associated with this family in Bedford County, but we have no document that establishes their relationship to the rest of this family. With all of the above as foundation for our story we will now present the documented history for our David Buck, Sr. The very first item we can find for our Bucks in Bedford County is in the 1775 tax list where a Thomas Buck was listed as paying 7 pounds, 6, as a resident of Colerain Township in Bedford Co., PA.
In the next yeara€™s tax recorda€”1776, we again find Thomas Buck, along with Jonathan Buck listed in Colerain Township of Bedford County. We have no tax records for 1777 & 1778, but in 1779 there was no Thomas Buck in Colerain Township.
In 1780 we still find David Buck and John Buck paying taxes in Colerain Twp., and Davida€™s brother, Thomas Buck, Jr. The 6th Company, 1st Battalion of the PA militia was formed from the men of Providence Township in 1781, with George Enslow as Captain.
We do not know any details about Davida€™s military service but we do know there were many British inspired Indian-attacks within the county where settlers were killed and their homes burned.
By 1784 both David and Jonathan were located in Providence Township in Bedford Co., PA, and their brother Thomas was still in Hopewell, just a few miles north of Providence. In 1789 Jonathan Buck sold his land in Providence Township and moved to the western side of the County, and from there (in 1793) he moved to Tennessee. Note that most of the purchases above naming Thomas Buck were surely for the Captain Thomas Buck of Hopewell Twp., the brother of our David, Sr. David Buck, land deeded to him by Benjamin Ferguson and Zilah, his wife, for 45 pounds, that tract of land called Oxford Situate on the waters of Brush Creek also running by the land of Thomas Buck, Esq.
Thomas Buck and wife Margaret, sold to George Myers, land in Providence Twp being rented by William Conners for $2,400., on Brush Creek joining John Allisona€™s survey and running by David Bucka€™s property. This is a very interesting entry as we know that the Captain, Thomas Buck (brother of our David Sr.) was the man who was married to Mrs. Before we continue with the Buck family, we need to take a sideways step to briefly discuss the Cashman family, as that brings in the wife of David Buck, Sr. This family lived for many years in Berks County, PA, and then in York Co., PA, before moving to Washington County, Maryland in 1777.
We should mention here that by this time the old Germanic family name had seen a number of changes that show up in many of the documents. Martina€™s oldest daughter, Catherine grew up in Pennsylvania and moved with her parents to Maryland when she was about 25 years old. David returned to his farm in Bedford County, PA with a new wife and four little step-children. While we are talking about close family members showing up in the temple records, there is one more that we should discuss at this point. The 1800 federal census is also a bit bewildering (but then census records are not known for their accuracy).
This entry make sense if there was only one Bumgardner boy still living in Davida€™s home and if he was between the ages of 10-16a€”which would be about right. In 1808 there was another tax list which shows David with 247 acres in Providence Twp, with 1 horse and 2 cows. His oldest son, Thomas, was already married and had been out of the house for about seven years before his father died. We dona€™t know how long Catherine Cashman Buck lived after the death of her husband but it appears she was still alive during the 1820 census as discussed above. The oldest child of our David Buck and Catherine Cashman (after her Bumgardner children) was Thomas Buck. Very nearby lived the family of Michael Blue, who had a daughter, Elizabeth Blue, born 30 March 1788, in Providence Twp, making her just about two years older than Thomas. Shortly after the birth of their youngest child the family moved to Van Buren, Pulaski Co., Indiana, where they were living in the 1860 census, and where Thomas died on 27 Feb. A number of local residents joined the Church at that same time which resulted in a backlash of hard feelings and persecution ensued, inducing many of them to sell their homes and move to Nauvoo, Illinois where the a€?Saintsa€? were gathering. With the other Saints, the Garlicks were forced to evacuate Nauvoo in 1846 and make their way across the state of Iowa to Council Bluffs.
We are not sure when Susannah was born, but her fathera€™s will makes it clear that she was younger than Elizabeth (who was born in 1795a€”according to her own record) and older than Mary, who was born in 1800 (as found in several census records). 50 years old (making him about 12-13 years younger than Susannah, and his wife, a€?Susana€? was five years younger than Solomona€”born about 1815. Whether Susannah died young, or married and changed her last name, is unknown to us at this time.
With a large gap between the first two children there could, and probably were, other children unknown to us at this time.
In the 1870 census we do find David Jr.a€™s daughter, Catherine Buck living in Providence with her Aunt Mary Buck (both of her parents had died prior to that year). After the birth of this last child the family moved to Columbus, Franklin Co., Ohio where we find them in the 1880 censusa€”except for their son, George, who would have been 13 in that census but does not appear with the family at that time. This Jonathan Buck remained close to his extended family and traveled back and forth between Pennsylvania and Ohio on various occasions. Note that this particular record does not say that Sarah was the daughter of Mary, but we learn that later on.
In the Ancestral File (LDS FHC) Mary has been sealed numerous times to a man by the name of Amos Jones. In the 1860 census, we find Saraha€™s mother, Mary Buck, living with her son-in-law and his two little girlsa€”Marya€™s grand-daughters.
Within the next decade (per the 1870 census) Jacob Foore had remarried and begun an additional family, so Mary moved into a home of her own and also took in her niece, Catherine Buck, with her little daughter, Amanda, who we have discussed above.
This concludes the presentation of the documented life of David Buck, Sr., his wife, Catherine Cashman, and their family.
Aunt Mary Buck is well, Catharine too, neather one of them lives with me now since last spring. Yours truly, write to me again and tell me all the news and I will give you all the news then.
It is with pleasure that I drop you a few lines to inform you we are all well at the present time and hope and trust these few lines may find you the same. I must tell you where we live, we live near Gapsvill and I thought I would write a few lines to you all. Times is very dull here now all though there is plenty of everything but fruit, there is none at tale, only what is shipped here.
I can't tell how Aunt or Catharine is gitting along for I have not had a letter from either one for five months or more, I can't tell why it is as I have written to both of them and got no answer.
One of my boys married a girl here and they have gone to keeping house here, so if my letter does not come to hand in time he can lift it and remail.
I am boarding, I don't keep house anymore and I received your picture and I thought I had thanked you for it in my letter long ago, if not I am very much obliged to you for it. I did not see Dasey Garlick when I was East, she was away from home the day I went to see her and I had so many places t go I did not get around again. I seen Telitha (Catharine) Garlick two but only to speak to her as met her on the road one day she is married to Wesley Clark, one of Elias Clark's boys. It appears that there is going to be plenty work to do this summer, lots of large buildings to go up this summer.
Temple there was completed, an Endowment House was erected in which sacred ordinances could be performed. The a€?Joseph Garlica€? listed as a€?heira€? and proxy for the males above, was EBGa€™s son. Abigail Jones 2nd cousin {Daughter of Capt.
Thomas Buck nephew {EBGa€™s brother, Thomas, md.
David Buck nephew {EBGa€™s brother, David, Jr. John Buck cousin {Son Thomas Buck & ELiz. Well, I could use a good war is the line that came into my head but I didna€™t say so because I could tell she would start into me like a whole slew of hens. He didna€™t say anything, even though he was all mouth, but I could tell a channel between us had opened.
I needed to eat something, but I didna€™t have any money, so I thought about slipping in and making cereal, but the kids always make the apartment smell like mustard and artificial grapes. I didna€™t want Antares to know I was looking for him, so I bought a skywriter, started twirling it through the square, which is how Kate said I would find him. The first week I spent with the tubes Antares lent me, I might as well have been working with a toothbrush. The thing about making love with Kate was that she knew how to run her fingers behind my neck and hold my head to her as she kissed me, like you think a man would do, but that men never do because it seems like something they should do and cana€™t live up to doing, so nobody ever does it except men in old movies, and Kate.
Before I saw Antares again, he came to me in a dream where he was a door, or the absence of a door, so it was like talking into a hole in a room that opened up.
When I saw Antares that day, it shouldna€™t have surprised me, but it was 12A° in the sun and I wasna€™t sure which side of it I was on. I raised out of my seat and tried to get off the bus, which was stuck behind a funeral procession. I got off the bus feeling wired and shaky, like the last thing in the world I need is to hear a kid playing flute. I was thirteen when I walked out the front door like every high school kid has wet dreams about doing when theya€™re not thinking about how to score.
So I kept going because by then Ia€™d worked up steam and I didna€™t care about suspension or graduation or even my music collection, which wasna€™t a tremendous collection, but it wasna€™t until the bus was pulling out of Chauquahana that I realized I was going to miss that. I pushed my palm against the wall, pulled back against his hand, pushed in until my hand began to sweat. Name of a weapon of the God of War, ita€™s a star in the constellation Scorpius, same one Ia€™m in. Youa€™re an archer, a Sagittarius, only youa€™re the arrow, a spark popped out of the fire. No, just that youa€™re protesting for the environment, and I can see you in a crowd of people like a forest. The thing about the rockstar kids was how they were all still playing characters in their own lives. They had a hangout in the forest where somebody had made a pit by pulling some rocks into a circle big enough to sit around. The wilderness, Mickey said, is a place you can go without any Twizzlers, so when somebody brings them in ita€™s like they invented them.
I dona€™t know, if the wilderness came with a sofa, I think thata€™d be pretty rad, Chris added. Ia€™m fine, you can sell it like twice a month or something, you just have to stay hydrated. How do you love someone so much you get jammed in the arm by a noob who practically breaks the needle off in your vein, and you cana€™t feel anything but the swell of your heart aching into the bruise?
No, but youa€™re gonna let me come back and belt one out next Saturday night and audition properlike. A woman in a purple dress that plunged to the whitewater of the polar caps took the stage and the lights dimmed again.
The song she had chosen was not the right one for this crowd, but MelanieE?s a€?Brand New Keya€? did have enough rhythm to get them clapping along.
When the third singer approached the stage, a wave of applause moved over the crowd like gossip. You want to stick a fondue forkful of ColemanE?s fuel down your ripe throat for the show of it, go ahead.
To admit youa€™re not in control and meet it with both fists hanging by your side is pretty brave. Kate was wearing black coconut perfume and the rockstar kids were looking especially bright-eyed under their Lucky Charms dye jobs.
Consequently, I can only name one person in my life today, other than family, which I have known for nearly five decades. I was accepted, an impressive accomplishment except for the fact that back then they pretty much took anyone who tried out. In my third year I realized that I was majoring more in Longhorn Band than electrical engineering, so I changed my major to Mus.
A special bond forms between the members of any group or team that has to work together to achieve a common goal, but each group experience is unique.
I sometimes wonder how different my life would have been had John Tilly not gotten me to UT where I became part of Mr. This engineering student ended up in education for 32 years teaching band, math, and computers. I knew UT was a big school, so I assumed that they had a football team and a band.A  I would probably want to be in that band. Someone told us that they had high hopes for the UT football team that year, but after they went 0-1-1 in their first two games, we forgot about them and concentrated on our own Andrews Mustangs.
I was accepted, an impressive accomplishment except for the fact that back then they pretty much took anyone who tried out.A  That soon changed. The other interesting memory from that week was the two girls from Houston who met for the first time at orientation then discovered that they had just graduated from the same high school!
In yet another exciting come-from-behind win, Texas finished the season undefeated and the unanimous choice for National Champions. No one else could have written it.a€? We can agree, grateful for such intimate looks into the BSIa€™s foundera€™s life and thoughts. It records Morleya€™s growing sense of mortality in the late 1940s and early a€™50s, a glimpse of which we had previously on p.
McLauchlin (1894-1975) was the Detroit News cultural critic for many years, and the book consists of 21 short broadcasts he did over radio station WWJ in the winter of 1942-43, when such things were scarcely imaginable at a time of global total war. In a€?The Waters of the Earth,a€? for example, he says something very akin to Christopher Morleya€™s remark about the Atlantic I recently reported; McL. There is no traditional reason why Scottish blood should leap when the name of England is spoken. McLauchlin grew up devoted to Sherlock Holmes, but in the 1930s and a€™40s he was close to Vincent Starrett in Chicago, not Christopher Morley in New York. McLauchlin wanted to do the same there a€” but appears to have worried about his status for doing so. He brings to life a time and a place for readers today whose later lives and experiences have been very different.
This true faith, I am happy to say, has made much progress in late years and, in our own republic, it has solidified into an active fellowship which calls itself the Baker Street Irregulars. Not only did we consider him a flesh-and-blood mortal, but we had the vague idea that he lived in Detroit and that we were likely to see him walking down the street. One was the Return stories appearing at the time in Colliera€™s Weekly, leading to their parents buying bonus volumes of A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of the Four: a€?this economical acquisition of a pair of masterpieces naturally prompted the close perusal of the same by our elders, producing much Sherlockian conversation around every fireside on the street. He was careful to inform us that all his storiesa€”even his excursions into fancya€”had been collected and written down by a certain Dr.
In April of 1903, when McLauchlin was eight years old (he remembered having been five), Gillette brought his play to Detroita€™s Opera House, a€?and every young gentleman on Alfred Street demanded, with the utmost in passion, to be taken to see him, even if the family were in consequence obliged to temporize with the butcher.a€? The effect was instantaneous, and permanent. He came into the BSI in 1944, and almost at once received one of the first fifteen Titular Investitures from Edgar W.
He provided encouragement to the young, and was generous not only with his time and knowledge, but with physical items, duplicates he had acquired in his collecting.
Ita€™s a shame it shows signs of having been cut down by the publisher to make a a€?marketablea€? book well under 200 pp. The groupa€™s original sparking plug was the ebullient, effervescent Scot, Russell McLauchlin, for many years the entertainment critic at the Detroit News. I had been a Holmes admirer from an early age, but my contact with his life and times had up until then been limited to the pages of my copy of the Doubleday Complete Sherlock Holmes, which my mother had given me on the occasion of my graduation from junior high school in Ann Arbor, Michigan, in 1944. After a single meeting, the membership unaccountably dispersed and nothing more was heard of it, although the young Heldenbrand had subsequently become an active participant in the activities of New Yorka€™s Baker Street Irregulars. Also prominently displayed are the inimitable contributions of the comic genius of the late Bill Rabe BSI, whose gift for offbeat humor was unmatched.
Yates (a€?The Greek Interpreter,a€? BSI) is retired chairman of the Romance Languages Department at Michigan State University, and today presides over The Napa Valley Napoleons of St. He does this in an orderly and well-organized but highly personal way; for each chapter he begins with a synopsis, then a€?Sources and Methodsa€? (a phrase fraught with meaning, or meanings, from his Pentagon days), followed by People and finally Places and Things. This is shown through Woodya€™s eyes in New York and Washington in 1940 and a€™41, and his close encounters not only with prominent history-book Americans like Dean Acheson and Wild Bill Donovan, and British agents in the States at the time, but with Baker Street Irregulars as well like Elmer Davis, Rex Stout, and Fletcher Pratt, who did play such clandestine roles before America itself entered the war at the end of 1941. Born in Hamilton, Ontario, in 1879, he came to New York at the age of nineteen to be an actor; got occasional parts in legitimate theater, and occasional vaudeville turns as well, and achieved a certain sort of immortality by doubling as Alf Bassick and Sir Edward Leighton in a road company of William Gillettea€™s Sherlock Holmes. Footner had published at least two more mysteries by then (Thievesa€™ Wit and The Owl Taxi), and would write many more. A great central hall with a gallery all around, and the mighty traveling crane still hanging overhead; and room after room of different sizes and shapes, and all on different levels. Morley gave New York, City of Cities nearly a page and a half in the December 11, 1937, Saturday Review of Literature.
New York City Guide (1939), 680 indexed pages packed with an amazing amount of information about New York in these decades. Footner is interested in the feminine side too, Hattie Carnegie and Elsa Maxwell, and the anonymous corps of stenographers, shopgirls and waitresses without whom the city would grind to a halt faster than you could say Fiorello La Guardia, as well the haute monde. He can and does wax poetic at points, for example his description of night falling and the citya€™s lights coming on at twilight as seen from the Rainbow Grill, sixty-five floors atop Rockefeller Center, still new at the time.
The Waldorf-Astoria gets two pages, but many New York hotels, and their bars and restaurants which were vital to the citya€™s life, get unaccountably short shrift. It may even help explain why, in the year of its publication, there had been no BSI annual dinner, and wouldna€™t be one a month later in January a€™38, either a€” not until 1940, after Edgar W. Of course, there is no overlooking the fact that the author left this book unfinished at his death twenty-two years ago, so that, rather like the appearance of the Hound in its own day, it is of necessity a retrospective work rather than a harbinger of restored better times. The Sauvage I knew, from the final dinners at Cavanagha€™s to the end of his life, was an older cosmopolitan New Yorker: a world-traveling journalist with a command of the most limpid, idiomatic prose in American English (and, I am confident, equally adept in at least two or three other languages), who spoke with a pronounced Maurice Chevaliera€“like French accent, something that was and is simply not noticeable in New York.
Mesdames McKuras and Vizoskie are to be congratulated heartedly for their excellent work of investigation, reconstruction, editing, and annotating. 1924), and thus was one of that vanished breed able to read certain of the adventures as they were published. The only area approaching this minor art form is his distaste for those aspects of American punctuation that put terminal punctuation inside closing quotation marks; then again, the editors did not permit this to survive their work, so the minor issue is moot in this publication.
What he consistently demands is that it be the Conan, and he writes often and strongly of Conanicity and the like. For that matter, he is doubtful that the actual residence was even on Baker Street, let alone its putative location on that street, whether the bifurcated thoroughfare of the Victorian era or the long single stretch of the decades since. Of course, I agree with the editors that Sauvage primarily used the Doubleday edition, with its errors and Americanisms, occasionally turning to the Baring-Gould Annotated for commentary. Previously Astor Curator of Printed Books and Bindings at the Pierpont Morgan Library, before that he was the director of Fordham University Press, where he published the Baker Street Journal for some happy years.
A hundred years ago, a principal delivery system for those kinds of material was the monthly magazine.
In fact, Peck claimed to be a€?the only true Sherlockiana€?; whereas, the annotators of this collection allege (p. They demonstrate the state of mind of a youngish Starrett trying to work from his reportera€™s notebooks, showing his growth toward writing his biography. Joyce (a€?The Yellow-backed Novel,a€? BSI) is a rare books dealer, and a long-time member of Chicagoa€™s bibliophile society, The Caxton Club. Novelist, short story writer, poet, critic, columnist, bookman, he was the voice of literary Chicago in the middle of the twentieth century. Starrett was a man of his times and commented in passing on his times and the people who moved in it. A dozen appendices record such topics as a Chicago Daily News article about the discovery of the real author of a€?The Case of the Man Who Was Wanted,a€? a list of pastiches involving Sherlock Homes and Gilbert & Sullivan, a list of Basil Rathbonea€™s movie roles before Sherlock Holmes, Ronald Knoxa€™s a€?10 Commandments of the Detective Story,a€? an essay on Sherlock Holmes by Christopher Isherwood, and Jay Finlay Christa€™s abbreviations for the stories. There is one column, for June 24, 1945, for which this reviewer wishes to have been told more by the editor. 1787 a€“ Thomas Buck applied for 400 acres including an improvement (house or barn) on the south side of Raystown Branch of the Juniata River on both sides of Brush Creek, adjoining Alisona€™s Survey, in Providence. 1789 a€“ Thomas Buck applied for 100 acres on the southeast side of Warrior Ridge, adjoining a survey of James Hunter on the north and by a survey of Barnard Dougherty esq.
And since the times have got so hard in the West I am glad I did not go, but I will come and see you all yet if all goes right but I can't say when. John Buck told me I could write a piece in his letter and I am very thankful to write with him as we have not your address.
I would have answered before now but was still thinking of being closer to you before this time but am about fixing to move back again to the old home place in Pennsylvania. I have had work all winter in a wholesale house where it is heated with gas, as warm as wood care. I just loaded the rice into my satchel, which she was looking at because it had a skull and bones and said POISON on the side.
The deer was tinged at the tips with auburn, so it mighta€™ve been a fire I have to burn off, like karma. It was so much effort for me to stay on and for her to pedal, I shoulda€™ve just jumped off and walked, but she was laughing the whole time like she was made of glass and breaking, so I held on, holding my legs out of the way of the wheel.
I had fallen asleep in Katea€™s bed with her hand tucked between my legs like kids do, because ita€™s warm. Kate teaches flute lessons to rich kids whose parents are practically salivating all over themselves to invite their friends to the Philharmonic and brag how they recognized little Magnusa€™s gift when he was playing recorder in his crib. Ia€™d seen it on a calendar of discount hotels, and there was something about the mountains in the backdrop of the a€?biggest little city in the worlda€? that I knew would look nice on a person, very steady and sedate. I was sitting in Geometry class and never has there been such a terrible useless fact as learning that no matter how you stretch sides AB and and AC of an isosceles triangle, they will always remain of equal length. How you had to ride over it to cross the bridge and at sundown the light shone in the Sunsphere like copper.
I felt like my hand was an ear pressed against the wall, which was sounding something I could almost make out.
Kate was sure, but she knew if she told him, hea€™d start thinking of his bumper stickers as blazons. I get honked at less on the holy days, but not as seldom as youa€™d think considering the town is cinched tight with the rhinestone buckle of the Bible belt. He was walking the other way, arms swinging side to side like they rocked him and he was the anchor ship of his own row.


Every time they discussed bringing a sofa they could leave in the woods, but they always forgot.
I got so I started practicing in the morning before IE?d eaten so I didnE?t throw up food IE?d gone to the trouble of making. It reminded me of a coat I saw in a museum oncea€”belonged to a Native American chief, made entirely of feathers. I knew it didna€™t matter if I lied, and honesty really is the best policy six times out of ten. When Reno broke into a€?Some people say IE?ve done alright for a girl,a€? she drew enough hoots not to hang her head when she strode back to her stool, yellow flicker feathers at her earlobes turning like wings. Every part of her was shinya€”lips glossed like a piece of hard candy, dress glinting with zirconium mirrors, heels polished as a stockbroker. AntaresE?s comment surprised me so much, I wondered afterward if he said it inside my head or out.
Nobody was around to see me, which was chancy, but it would have been more dangerous to have Kate there.
Just like that, I knew I could drop the weight of the past like a coat, forgive Mama everything and the whole goddamned world we were born into, wash us off in a wave of flames, let the current carry us to another shore. As an honor student and first chair trombone in the band, I figured I was pretty well set for life. Since we graduated in a€™69, we may have been part of the first administration of the test. I played my trombone next to people who grew up in the Austin area dreaming of the day when they would take their places in the ranks of burnt orange bandsmen. This country boy from the anthills of West Texas stumbled into, and became part of, an historic college football season with more than enough memories to last a lifetime.
I tried to provide my students with some of the positive experiences I enjoyed as a student. Then on New Years Day 1969 I was watching TV and stumbled onto a game called the Cotton Bowl and there was the UT band! As the banda€™s numbers began to exceed 400, the selection process became much more competitive. However, after a flu epidemic the week before an OU game thinned the ranks of the LHB, the ladies came to the rescue and have marched ever since.
In 1970 I met Beverly Green, a freshman saxophone player from Austin who was the daughter of a Baptist minister.A  Beverly had made a last minute switch from enrolling in her parentsa€™ alma mater, Baylor, to attend UT. He died this September (2014) at the age of 95.A  Just last year he was still directing the Longhorn Band in The Eyes of Texas at a football game.
The book had been proposed by Morleya€™s visionary friend Buckminster Fuller back in the mid-1970s, in order to record a€?the friendship between two quite disparate personalities of the twen-tieth century, and the influence they had on each other in the course of their lives.a€? Morley, a man of letters if one ever lived, described his friend in 1938 as a€?an engineer, inventor, industrial designer, a very botanist of structure and materialsa€? and a€?a student of Trend,a€? and the experience of knowing each other was a bit like C. Leavitt as an a€?Holmesian aboriginea€? during the early years of that decade, and he appears on Morleya€™s mid-a€™30s membership list for the BSI (p. It is the inferiority complex of the newly cultivated, the intellectual climbers, that gives them their passion for dressing up and going to public festivity. 430 of Irregular Crises of the Late a€™Forties, in a March 1950 letter of his to Doubledaya€™s Kenneth McCormick about Morleya€™s fears for his health. Smitha€”Morley remarking to Fuller in 1944 about having sent Smith (perhaps prophetically) a copy of The Martyrdom of Man, a€?the wonderful book so highly praised by Sherlock Holmes.a€? But even in his final years Morley went on writing poetry, his daughter noted. His vignettes are based a good deal on pre-war travel of his, from his home statea€™s and Canadaa€™s lake districts and wildernesses to sites in Europe, not only ones like London and Paris, but obscure ones as well both then and now. Ia€™m obliged for my language and all that my language implies, including Shakespeare and Dickens. Still, what sort of audience did he and it expect for a book about travel in a world convulsed by war? Smith looked up McLauchlin and the Amateur Mendicants on trips to General Motors headquarters in Detroit, and was greatly impressed, reporting to Christopher Morley in March 1947 that the AMS were a€?easily, under Russ McLauchlina€™s guidance, the most erudite of the Scions. The nature of young boys is largely unchanged, no doubt, but the sense of innocence at that time, where a€?the wara€? meant the three-month Spanish-American War, or even somebody elsea€™s Boer War, not the carnage of World War I or II, stirs a yearning in the readera€™s breast. Youthful ears overheard these discussions and the name of the detective grew familiar.a€? a€” a pattern doubtless replicated in many American homes then where early Irregulars were children. Watson, who enjoyed the incalculable advantage of being the great mana€™s friend and room-mate.
Later he lived in Pittsburgh, where in the 1970s he mentored its Fifth Northumberland Fusiliers. Bliss evoked that earlier Baker Street Irregularity when giants in the earth became Irregulars, writing so much to edify and entertain everyone else in it.
I was one of his beneficiaries in both ways, but it was his time and knowledge I appreciated most, working with him on his superlative contributions to Baker Street Miscellanea when I was one of its editors, and on an essay by him for my 1987 book The Quest for Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Rufus Tucker (a€?The Greek Interpreter,a€? 1944), an economist who lived close by but worked in Manhattan at General Motors Overseas with Edgar W.
Randall (a€?The Golden Pince-Nez,a€? of Scribnera€™s Bookstore on Fifth Avenue) first attended the annual dinner in 1940, not 1941. Not a term I would use, though all the other fine things she says about him there and on the page following are accurate. The fact that by 1981 he could remark upon the swollen size of the BSI dinner, that it had reached a€?the maximum number of people but a minimum amount of fun,a€? made him not a curmudgeon, but a sober observer of an historical reality that neither Julian Wolff nor his successors have been prepared to address. These days the BSI prints books in runs of only 100 copies, a far cry from the 750 it once needed to print for my last three Archival History chronological volumes, all of them sold out today. He was soon joined at the helm of the Mendicants by attorney Robert Harris, and together they guided the sciona€™s activities with the rollicking blend of Baker Street nostalgia and encouragement for tongue-in-cheek scholarship that has somehow always effortlessly imposed itself on such gatherings. Russ invited me to the groupa€™s next meeting and asked if I could compose something with a Sherlockian connection to read on that occasion.
I, for one, convey to Music my profound thanks for his masterful job of editing, a product of his dedication to the cause that motivates us all a€” keeping ever green the memory of Sherlock Holmes and Baker Street. Each and every one of these subsets is a source of data covering many, many subject areas, and the whole creates a rich canvas for readers. The tense and uncertain atmosphere of those days comes across with clarity, and is a good example of Lellenberga€™s sense of atmosphere in evoking BSI history unknown to today's Irregulars.
And like many would-be actors who come to New York, he did a lot of other things as well to make ends meet, including turning to writing.
One reason why his detective tales have always been for me the perfect laxative is that I usually read them when I should be doing something else.a€? Morley had read them all, from Footnera€™s first one published in 1918.
At this time it had not been altered from its original state beyond what could be accomplished by sweeping and scrubbing. The members never tired of conducting visitors through the endless, empty rooms, running up and down the odd steps, and climbing the casual ladders while they pointed out the future library, billiard-room, the private dining-room, etc., etc. He limits himself for the most part to Manhattan Island, and goes about in his sleuthy fashion, inconspicuously conning and eavesdropping. Ia€™m currently preparing my long-overdue a€?sources and methodsa€? companion volume to my novel Baker Street Irregular, and felt forced to go back to an early section identifying and discussing the books about New York per se which informed my novel a€” three about the city itself (all but one published in the 1930s), and seven more about life there in the 1930s and a€™40s. With that, and New York, City of Cities (1937) by Hulbert Footner, a detective-story writer friend of Christopher Morleya€™s and a fellow member of the Three Hours for Lunch Club, the prospective Irregular novelist may be able to do without the eleven books above. The Algonquin, despite manifold literary and theatrical associations, gets not a single word. Smith had arrived to take over the labors of dinner-arranging, notice-mailing, and negotiations with waiters that Morley eschewed.
I heard that Bill had gone (suddenly, without long misery, as he would most have wished) and I carried onto the hearth the great oak stump I had chosen. Given an assignment some six decades ago on postwar American exports to Europe, Sauvage interviewed a certain gracious senior official of overseas operations for General Motors at his office on Broadway at 57th Street.
One such magazine, The Bookman, appeared with different content on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean.
Bret Harte represented the United States in the role of Consul to a couple of European cities. He not only wrote one of the best biographies of Sherlock Holmes in The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes (1933), but kept green the memory of the Master in his weekly a€?Books Alivea€? column for the Chicago Tribune.
At the very end (before a most able index) there is a chronology of the Life and Times of Vincent Starrett, with dates and events in the world beyond Starrett as well as those in his own life.
I know it is, because I have been nauseated since listening to the president's summit last Thursday.If nothing else in this never-ending suffocation of American health care has been clear, the sham was transparent enough. The reason is that the man that was to buy my farm, backed out and I had made sale on the 27th day of March and sold everything to come and then after that man backed out I was to sell to another man and his wife died just two days before the time was for us to start and that knocked me all wrong all that I had and the balance of the company before I could rent again. My wife has been sick nearly ever since we have been in Ohio and is not sadis ficte [sic satisfied] to go any farther west and she now has the agure [ague] and two of my children has got it and I have concluded to take them where the Agure seldom comes any more, that is in Pennsylvania where they was born. The themometer was at one time 14 degrees below zero, that was perty cold, but they have had two feet of snow on the level back at our old home place this winter. One of the first priorities of the work was a complete examination of all previous exploration and excavation in the precinct, particularly that of Margaret Benson carried out in 1895-7. I knew shea€™d be good for me, which she started being as soon as she got me up to her apartment. I pulled in back of myself as far as I could and looked across the crystal desert of the parking lot.
She wasna€™t home but leaves her door unlocked for situations like this, and she almost always has tuna fish, the good kind, with oil.
She said it so often I thought it was her way of telling me things were going to be hard, and it took me more years than it should have to realize it was a line in the song. Plus, I figured I was about the biggest little girl in the world, so me and that name took up with each other like an old couple who buy each other cough drops and dona€™t have their own socks. I stood up and walked right out, which probably even I thought I was doing for a breather, go to the weight room and tip the machine for a Coke, but once I got out, I felt the sheer absurdity of it all. Something about a river makes a town flow through you, and you can ride off on the rainbow current with some boozy grubfish.
She fought the look of naA?vety on her, had her lip pierced, painted black wings around her eyes. She asked herself, folding another sheet of colored paper onto the burn pile of Cancer crabs.
The thing was, it was February and we were getting a glimpse of the spring to come, but we still had the rest of the month and all of March left. Thata€™s what paradise is, like when you really need a drink and the liquor is right there.
My stomach clenched when the bar reached my back palate, but I found a little arc in the reflex where it becomes involuntary.
It jumped out of my hand twenty-seven times, but on the twenty-eighth, I breathed deep and it stayed awhile. I stitched the smaller feathers onto larger feathers and the larger feathers onto patches of cloth. They werena€™t two individuals playing it out, but artists thrumming on the heart of a Siamese people. Shawn was riding the silverplated eagle up the crystalcoated stairs, drying glasses off and shaking rocks into my whiskey, like diamonds, hea€™d say smiling every once in awhile.
You donE?t rewire a reflex to become a circus freak, collect a few ahs and rounds of applause. When she appealed to them with a€?If I Were Your Woman,a€? the crowd slammed their mugs against the bar and smacked their thighs and shouted out promises of what they would do if she were theirs.
Antares had no interest in Colleen or J.TE?s business plan or Whipgloss, who was apparently a regular act with a not unwarranted following. If Ia€™d left it there, they would have met and burned me up, but I pulled it out, satisfied, for maybe the first time.
When the backup singers rose and fanned around her like a cloak, it was like a sunrise of music ordaining this dark little basement bar, a gleaming catch pulled fresh from the ocean. I burst into song thena€”one of mine instead of a covera€”the air around me like it would never stop breathing, and me a horse standing in the mountains hitched to a frost-burned, empty cart.
Frances knows I wasna€™t raised with the social niceties of skipping off to get somebody a clean spoon.
While I expected to discover new and exciting things about the wide world beyond west Texas, I had no idea how small the sliver of my experience thus far had been. In a university of 30,000+ students, a tight-knit group of 300 band members became my family.
John graduated with a degree in journalism in four years (one of those anomalies) and went on to become a lawyer in Dallas.
John was a fellow honor student so we had a lot of the same classes and even double-dated in our later HS years.
Actually, there were two UT bands, because Texas was playing Tennessee, but I was more interested in the burnt orange group.
From the marching flags to the fringed uniforms to the beaver Stetson hats, DiNino infused the Longhorn Band experience with personality and pride.
In a university of 30,000+ students, a tight-knit group of 300 band members became my family.A  The Longhorn Band was a fine musical organization, but most of the band members were not music majors.
She only tried out for LHB because of the insistence of her high school best friend, Brenda Dees. My freshman band was the first group to rehearse in the new, state-of-the-art band hall.A  In the summer of a€™69 the LHB had moved out of the converted barracks building (outgrown years before) that served as the banda€™s a€?temporarya€? quarters for 20 years.
The man had an incredible memory, super human energy, and a larger-than-life personality that inspired the creation of The Showband of the Southwest over half a century ago. But it sheds some new light on Morleya€™s composition of Sherlock Holmesa€™s Prayer in 1944, which Fuller was one of the first to see, and provides interesting insights into Morleya€™s relationship with people swept into the early BSIa€™s orbit, like Don Marquis in the 1930s and Morleya€™s secretary Elizabeth Winspear at 46W47 in the 1940s, until she went off to war.
He was not a great nor even a very good poet, but he loved doing it, and despite his first strokea€™s handicap a€?he was still able to write enough poems to complete a final small collection called Gentlemena€™s Relish (1955).a€? One poem, first published in the Saturday Review of Literature on October 2, 1954, was a€?Elegy to a Railroad Station,a€? a tribute by an ageing man who still considered himself a Main Line Boy, to the Broad Street Station of his Philadelphia childhood that had been razed in 1953. I suspect that he and I are the only Baker Street Irregulars whoa€™ve ever been to TromsA?, Norway, above the Arctic Circle. Ia€™m obliged to England for the law under which I live, for the English common law, which was developed through many centuries, is the law of America today, although many heedless Americans do not realize it. He died in 1988, one of the BSIa€™s great personalities and scholars a€” the a€?Prince of the Realma€? of this booka€™s title, taken from my obituary for him in the Baker Street Journal at the time. He made a strong impression upon Smith and Morley to be included so soon in the first crop of Titular Investitures, and repaid their confidence in him through the decades that followed as one of the BSIa€™s leading collectors and scholars, writing for the Baker Street Journal, Baker Street Miscellanea, and his own annual, eagerly awaited, Baker Street Christmas Stockings which have been collected in book form. He was a gentleman and scholar in the best sense of that expression, and a model contributor to the Writings About the Writings.
For example, Peter Blau in his foreword refers to it containing the landmark talk that Bliss gave at the 1976 BSI dinner about BSI a€?poetess laureatea€? Helene Yuhasova, but it is not present.
While Park Avenue north of Grand Central was fashionable, the Murray Hill Hotel was south of it. But this book has made it into a second printing, which shows people still care about the BSIa€™s history. It was during this rebirth of the society, beginning in 1975, that Tom Voss joined the group. Some travel-adventure books about Canada did not make a noticeable mark, so he turned to mysteries next, more successfully this time.
But Morley had read it even earlier, he bragged: a€?I read it in MS, way back about 1916, when I was contact man for Bill at his publishers. No mere scrubbing could really clean up a place in which the grime of decades of iron-founding was ingrained.
He is in a sense a stool pigeon between the mystery (New York itself) and the inquisitive reader. Footner, like every other whose heart is capable of stir, does not see only our great ladya€™s moods of cockeyed comedy and exhibitionism. Morley may have been too darned busy enjoying New York instead; and tracking down the answers to the a€?little examination paper on Mr.
They have brought this book close to the form its author would have achieved had he been vouchsafed the time to do so. The niceties of selling vehicles in Europe took ten minutes; the next two hours were devoted to Sherlock Holmes. Individual Foreign Service officers assisted Fry at the risk of their careers, just as, at sea, the U.S. Barrie, Jack London, Harding Davis, Anna Katherine Green, as well as his predecessors in Poe, Gaboriau, and Vidocq. As poor as any is a€?The Stolen Cigar Case,a€? in which Sherlock Holmes as Hemlock Jones deduces a condition of affairs which puts an end to his long association with Watson. 179, Starrett relates an anecdote at the Cliff Dwellersa€™ Club in Chicago which involved Arnold Bennett and Karl Edwin Harriman.
Not every column mentioned Sherlock Holmes, but just as King Charlesa€™ head kept popping up in the manuscript Mr.
Interestingly, the very first discusses the manuscript of a€?The Case of the Man Who Was Wanted,a€? suspected at that time to be an actual undiscovered Sherlock Holmes story written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Whenever a person or event might not be understood by todaya€™s reader, editor Murdock has inserted a footnote of explanation.
It begins almost a decade before Starretta€™s birth with the birth of Carl Sandburg, another noted Chicago literary figure and friend of Starretta€™s whose birthday is also that of Sherlock Holmes, January 6. Hatch of Minneapolis, who supplied Starrett with some statistics regarding the detective story. Ia€™m obliged to EnglandA  for the law under which I live, for the English common law, which was developed through many centuries, is the law of America today, although many heedless Americans do not realize it. Buck a visit now, so must bring these few lines to a close by asking you to please write soon as this reaches you.
This land was made for you and me to escape from or to, but the mountains have just been there all along.
The thing that killed me though, the clincher, was how before I climbed on, she packed my rice into the saddlebags and started singing this song, all wavery with pauses while she made it up, patting the bags like thighs she was weighing out.
He was wrapping my questions in something cool and close, like a suitcase full of dry white beans. Like their parents condense twenty-seven years of suppressed creative energy into one terrifically off-handed name.
So I made myself a peanut butter and tuna sandwich, which sounded pretty good because I was running low on protein, and it didna€™t taste half bad for the first couple of bites. It didna€™t even occur to me to write Antares until about the fourth day, and then I wasna€™t sure how to spell it or what I wanted exactly. Come here, he walked over to a building and put my hand against the brick wall, his hand on top of mine. The only thing just about Chris was his angera€”because his mother left them and his dad was a workaholic, because everyone had their own lives to live and no one paid attention to anyone elsea€”Mother Nature was just the representative. It had caught a sheet of newsprint and was tugging it into the telephone wires like an obstinate child. On the twenty-ninth I noticed how my nasal passage was getting crushed but if I breathed slow, air could get around it. Nobody making you, and nobody gonna pat your backside either, even if it is as sweet as white flour. It was a Wednesday night, so there werena€™t many people in the place, but it was nice and dark and had a purple couch. I sat for long enough to think probably Shawn wasna€™t the best person to know about time passing, so I got up and started looking for a greaser in the bowels of the place.
You might could tell if you werenE?t so busy getting that hard cold proof down your gullet. I got three lady singers in the joint who are going to try their best to bring this place to its knees. Before the woman, who called herself Colleen Parker, took her seat, she volunteered herself.
The thing is, your house burning down is just like anything else, all you can do is say no. They were dressed to the nine-inch heels, pouting because he wouldnE?t comp all their drinks but made them nudge and flirt for them like the other customers. She said some part of me was going to rest when I found him, and some part was going to grow up. The speakers were backed up against the stage, but there was a sweet spot if I turned a little to the left and leaned back to get my spine straight and line my vocal chords up. Back then most people were white, different sexual orientations did not exist, you were lucky to get three channels on your TV, and except for going to church on Sundays, nothing was more important than high school football. Beverly ended up with degrees from UT, A&M, and SMU, or as we like to say, almost half of the old Southwest Conference! Fortunately for me, John decided that he and I would make great college roommates, and by our junior year we had a plan. It did not matter if one was a business, education, or humanities major, or even an engineer or pre-med student. Snowa€™s The Two Cultures coming together and exploding like the fissile spheres of an atom bomb. The non-BSI journalist Henry Morton Robinson averred, in a December 4, 1943, Saturday Review of Literature article (which the BSI did not regard highly; it appears as ch. There are welcome references to Christ Cellaa€™s and Billy the Oysterman in Morleya€™s literary and social life, and to the Saturday Review of Literature where the BSI presented itself to the world. EG the Phi Beta Kappa campaign for Defense (of Intellectual Freedom!) They have sent me a booklet: a€?Phi Beta Kappa Fortifies Its Sector in the Defense of the Humanitiesa€™ etc. Ia€™m obliged to England for about 85 per cent of the social conventions which make community living a pleasant thing.
But the answera€™s in the reading of it: it was written and published for civilized men and women waiting and working for that war to end, with democracy victorious. 205, a€?received and transmitted such masterworks from and to the effete of the East, and commonfolk like ourselves elsewhere. Yet he was a man of the humanities too, and not of Sherlock Holmes and Conan Doyle alone: Japanese art as well, with a collection of prints that are at Pittsburgha€™s Carnegie Mellon Museum today. By the 1980s he was the chief representative of the BSIa€™s Murray Hill Hotel era and its values, but he was never a relic himselfa€”he was instead someone very much engaged with the present. Sonia also does an excellent job on Bliss as a collector, and how he made his collection work for him, and thereby for the rest of us as well. While vastly respected by Julian Wolff, our Commissionaire from 1961 through most of the a€™80s, I dona€™t know of him ever involving Bliss significantly in the running of the BSI. Of some three dozen mystery novels, his final one, Orchids to Murder, was published by Harper & Brothers in 1945, following Footnera€™s death from a heart attack the previous November 25th. He was the first author professionally assigned to me when I started work at Doubledaya€™s, in 1913.
Somebody had presented the Foundry with a set of elaborately carved and lacquered Chinese Chippendale for the dining-room.
On racial issues, he is enlightened for his era, respectful of New Yorka€™s black community, and fascinated by Harlem and its society. In the poeta€™s truest vein is his description of the lights at dusk seen from the RCA building. Where is the extra show-window that rises from the pavement at night to fill the front doorway of the store?
Navy actively cooperated with the Forces FranA§aises Navales Libres (Free French Naval Forces) before Pearl Harbor, in direct disobedience of official policy. Not that I would not love to leisurely flip through all of the four decades of The Bookman, but the essence of this volume is that Dahlinger and Klinger have already extracted the full contributions, and reorganized them chronologically and by genre (Chronicle and Comment, Letters to the Editor, Articles, Pastiches and Parodies, and Reviews), giving a contemporary flow to each section. A lot of this material is familiar to in-depth students of the subject, but it is a quick, rewarding refresher course in the subject matter, with learned annotations, but with occasional nuggets that pop to the surface. One night, after a night of partying, Harte returned home to discover that he had lost his cigarette case.
I would swear that elsewhere (in Born in a Bookshop?) the same anecdote is told involving Opie Read and Vincent Starrett. Steve Doyle and his Gasogene Press colleagues are to be applauded for producing this project. Dick was writing in David Copperfield, the name of Sherlock Holmes would surface in Starretta€™s columns without warning. The last column completely devoted to Sherlock Holmes is a review of Pierre Nordona€™s Conan Doyle: A Biography.
In addition, there is a lengthy section at the end of biographical sketches (a€?Personaliaa€?) of Sherlockians and others whom Starrett mentions in his columns. Unfortunately, there is no footnote or entry under a€?Personaliaa€? to explain just who Talbot C.
We heard them mock their own bill by referring to it as a "prop." We watched as those who opposed the bill were insulted and shut off from discussion, and the end result was an immediate threat to "go along" with the 2,400 pages of lower- quality, higher-cost, more restrictive medical treatment or take it up at the polls in November.Do the progressives have no intellectual honesty left in them?
1843, David Garlick also passed away at the age of 63 and was buried in the old Pioneer Cemetery on the SE corner of that city.
Corn up here, the folks that has corn is just pulling the ears off leaving the foder so that stops the work from off the farms hands so there is no work to do. William is clerking in a grocery store and drives a delivery wagon for the store part of his time. Maybe you can mind old Peter Weaverling that used to live east of my father, it is one of his boys she married, sister to Daisy Garlick. A thirty year old semi-invalid of a distinguished English family, she had the rare good luck to ask for the concession to a site that seemed unimportant and a site that no one else wanted. Ia€™m making my way to them on a hobo pilgrimage toward salvation, because I dreamed my soul was inside one of them in a deer. That grocery store clerk was my mother, sure as the mole on my face, springing up like a reprimand that wona€™t be put down, because her concern for me is something I have to carry for some fixed amount of time like my own dead weight.a€?a€?a€?= The Ricea€?a€?The second person I asked about Antares I slept with because it was time.
I couldna€™t tell it was him at first because fur isna€™t something you expect to see on a bastard, which I figured he was.
If their own parents had given them names that came with their own personality, maybe they could crawl out from the microscope under which they live. But after about four bites I realized it wasna€™t really that good so I squirted Tabasco on it and washed it down with sour orange juice, which I must have been complaining about in my head because right then Frances walked in and told me to buy my own juice if I wanted the ritzy stuff; she was poor.
Harner could tell them about Pythagoras, or drop his kids off at the swimming pool or Vietnam, where my dad had gone and gotten himself killeda€”years before, so I wasna€™t all traumatized or anything, but it did sort of rush together like a washing machine full of insight that all I had in the world was a mother who didna€™t want me to see the bruises she gave herself and a brother who was trying to raise a little girl. Ciara pushed against her hard, leaning with her whole body, digging her fingers in a little. She never felt so alone as after folding another origami scorpion to lay on top of the crowd.
Something about his bare head should have made him vulnerable but instead it made him fierce. On the thirtieth try, my mind had a fita€”I should get a gig or write music instead of this useless crapa€”but the picture had hold of me, of being onstage. I want you to make E?em feel welcome, clap hardest for the one you like most, not the one with the biggest titties, E?cause IE?m trying to run me a serious music theater. I figured it was a sure thing sheE?d take the dubious honor of official bar singer, but IE?d give her a run for it nonetheless.
Funny I wanted her to hear me now when I wouldnE?t let her come the first night, but I realized I didnE?t need my attention for something else. That grocery store clerk was my mother, sure as the mole on my face, springing up like a reprimand that wona€™t be put down, because her concern for me is something I have to carry for some fixed amount of time like my own dead weight.= The RiceThe second person I asked about Antares I slept with because it was time.
My only college experience was the Tech-Arkansas football game that another frienda€™s family took me to in Lubbock. To complete the last year of her seminary studies at SMU, Beverly lived with John and his wife Wanda in Irving during the week, making the three-hour journey home each weekend. Texas won the game, consecutive win #9 in what would eventually become a school-record 30 game win streak. In an on-again, off-again relationship over the next few years, we finally got married in 1976 and ita€™s been on-again ever since! 13 in a€™Thirties) that a€?Buckminster Fuller, perpetrator of the Dymaxion car, hired a Central Park hansom and clopped to the [1934 BSI] dinner as Dr. And this booka€™s discussion of Morleya€™s changing mood postwara€”noting that by 1947 he a€?was becoming more withdrawn and disinclined to company unless he himself had arranged the meetinga€?a€”helps explain the BSIa€™s existential crisis of 1947-48 examined in detail in Irregular Crises of the Late a€™Forties.
Ia€™m obliged to England for the fine spirit which generally animates the whole diverse activity of sports.
If an occasional paper looked particularly choice, one might even send a copy to the Mother Church in New York, but I recall no acknowledgment or reply.
2 in my Irregular Crises of the Late a€™Forties.) But Soniaa€™s biography is nonetheless the best and most valuable account we are likely to have of Bliss Austina€™s life, and what made him the man and outstanding Baker Street Irregular he was. We have important collectors today, but none of them are doing what Bliss did with his collection, so one hopes this book will lead to more from the same.
50-51, of the BSIa€™s existential crisis of 1947-48 is so abbreviated that readers should consult the detailed account in Irregular Crises of the Late a€™Forties in order to understand fully what was going on. Russ liked it and recommended that I send it to Edgar Smith, who was then editing the Baker Street Journal. We hadna€™t been doing too well with his early novels of the Canadian Northwest, and Bill wanted to develop a new vein. Walls and rafters were covered by innumerable coats of whitewash which flaked down like snow; and the windows bore a sulphurous patina that had so far refused to yield to soapsuds. This was arranged at the rear of the wide gallery upstairs, partly enclosed by handsome screens that matched the furniture; and in the little room thus formed a small company was gathered for the usual midday rites.
They were of great importance to their author, for they gave him a chance to express certain stoic observations on the human comedy he had watched unflinchingly.a€? After Footner resettled in Marylanda€™s Eastern Shore countryside, he wrote nonfiction books about it as well. He points out the positive effects of Robert Mosesa€™ redesign of the citya€™s layout, but also shows his readers the lasting negative effects of Prohibition and Depression. The effect was akin to my first visit to New York at age eight with my parents, and the overpowering Circle Line boat trip we took around the island: I still have the guidebook from it. The nugget within the nugget is that Doyle refused to be engaged upon the project despite an essentially guaranteed advance payment of half a million dollars! They know, as every American instinctively knows, this bill is not affordable to the citizens of this country, and they also know that it will reduce the availability and quality of health care for the majority of citizens. It was assumed that even an woman amateur with no experience could do little harm at the nearly destroyed Temple of Mut, in a remote location south of the Amun precinct at Karnak.
Like a shadow of algae going to rive me from this stream.a€?a€?The first person I asked about him said Honey, whatchu want to know about Antares for?a€?a€?I dona€™t know that many people, I told her. But even from that distance, I could see his cheekbones were high and carved straight out of his skull.
He talked alright, but I could hear him clear as a bell thinking, a€?slice slice slice slicea€? and the visual it came with was like fish gills full of bitters. I asked her if it would make me cursed because a girl at school said that song was about a whore. When I saw him, our eyes locked and I panicked, wondering what I was going to do now, but he walked right up and said, What? Even if he had to wait a couple maybe agonizing days, at least he wouldna€™t spend them indentured to the terror everybody else had of the cold.
It made you wonder what a whole population of people would be like if they never stopped creating themselves, like there was never any obligation to anything but cool. I knew if I swallowed a sword it would quiet the audience for the sound of my voice coming out. But I knew I put it there because I hadna€™t had time to wash my hands in the lettuce bowl. Maybe hea€™d gotten under the fence at his house or broken off the chain; hea€™d gotten loose from his owner anyhow. What I am opening to is right here, including the fear that she might miss me and the fact that I need her and she might not be able to provide.
Like a shadow of algae going to rive me from this stream.The first person I asked about him said Honey, whatchu want to know about Antares for?I dona€™t know that many people, I told her.
He had studied our profiles (with pictures attached) and knew virtually everyonea€™s name on the first day a€“ thata€™s over 100 freshmen band members. One advantage of staying in band an extra year was the fifth-year lettering award a€“ a set of Longhorns. Ia€™ve learned a lot over the years, and Ia€™m grateful to all those who have helped direct my life. One of my treasured possessions is a copy of Terry Freia€™s book, Horns, Hogs, & Nixon Coming. Watson.a€? No data corroborating this assertion is known to exist, or that Fuller even attended that dinner (or any other BSI dinner as far as I recall). He never went into the Knothole [his writing cabin at home] again, nor would he allow anyone else to sort his papers.a€? After a third stroke in 1955 a€?he required round-the-clock nursing care and remained bedridden for the rest of his life,a€? which came to an end on March 28, 1957. And Ia€™m obliged to England for at least nine-tenths of the books which Ia€™ve ever read in all my life. You are now, yourself, at liberty to write that paper on the Scandal, and I shall look forward to it.
It soon appeared in the BSJ, and as if by magic a new world of bonhomie was opened to me, an association that has lasted a lifetime. When a second hiatus occurred, the accumulated papers comprising the Mendicantsa€™ archives that had been passed to Voss went into storage. Nevertheless, the members of the Three-Hours-for-Lunch Club loved their unconventional clubhouse. Christopher Morley, who modestly describes himself as steward in perpetuum to the Three Hours for Lunch Club, but is really the whole works. And in 1937, the same year that four of his mystery novels came out, he published another quite different book entirely: a€?a testament of his love of New York City,a€? Morley called it a€” New York, City of Cities. Fry, who ended his life uncelebrated, suffering from alcoholism and making a poor living teaching Greek and Latin to young boys at a New England prep school, had been more than heroic, rescuing upwards of 2,000 persons, until State had Vichy throw him out of France. He contributed quizzes to Ellery Queena€™s Mystery Magazine in the 1940s and compiled an extensive bibliography of writers of detective fiction that exists in at least two typewritten copies. It appears that, like spoiled children, these '60s leftovers care not about anything except their own power.
She worked there for only three seasons from 1895 to 1897 and she published The Temple of Mut in Asher in 1899 2 with Janet Gourlay, who joined her in the second season. I asked her how she dealt with stuff like that but she looked at me kind of puzzled like you dona€™t know? She asked if I felt cursed and I said no, and she said curses dona€™t exist, and besides, I liked being called Roxy-anne like I had my own adjective, and Roxy, like moxie and Rocks, like star.
Something about having to make sandwiches out of ketchup and saltines made Reno unable to count on anything as unreliable as that.


When the tube touched ground in the bottom of my stomach and came barreling back out as a flame of sound, I figured.
She was ringing up my rice, which was when she noticed I had about seventeen bags of rice and thata€™s all.
He had an incredible knack for remembering names, even names of former band members from years past. When we became acquainted with Vincent Starrett after he published The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes in late 1933, we found him a more gracious point of exchange. Mike Whelan, the current Wiggins, uses that term, a€?for the young Irregulars of the a€™60s and a€™70s,a€? on pp.
Prominent among these documents was an exhaustive record of the doings of the society that had been brought together by Mendicant Raymond Donovan, who had joined in 1948. As I have written elsewhere, Julian was the master of the one-liner, and the consummate detector of humbug and pretense. Van Allen Bradley (author of Gold in Your Attic), offered to sell me that original autograph letter. If we allow one-sixth of our economy to be taken over by what has essentially become a handful of "government gangsters" (Michael Barrone's term, not mine) we are in serious trouble. Garlick was then baptized for John and Jacob Bumgardner and the record calls him a a€?half nephewa€? of those two men.
In the introduction to that publication of her work she emphasized that it was the first time any woman had been given permission by the Egyptian Department of Antiquities to excavate; she was well aware that it was something of an accomplishment. I had pushed in maybe a millimeter, so I pulled back into his hand, sank in maybe a centimeter before my body dissolved like pixie stix in acid. In fact, by the time my tenure on campus was complete, I viewed four-year graduates as the anomalies. They were huge and created a wall of sound like I had never heard.A  College band looked way cool. John gave me my copy a€“ autographed by the late James Street, quarterback of the a€™68 & a€™69 teams. Fate dictated that the file should eventually end up in the hands of Music, who joined the group in 2001.
Some of the most disturbing and tantalizing things in his testament are unfinished scraps of overheard conversation. Sadly I could not afford the approximately $150 he asked for it, and it went to someone else.
One after another I asked dumb questions like that until he started winding them around this wheel, like the millera€™s daughter spinning straw into gold, I said, which made him smile so wide I fell right through the door.
He leaned his body into mine against the wall, holding it there, which made me able to feel the wall again, him.
An occasional a€?professional studenta€? would test the limits of this opportunity.A  I think Chuck set the record at 12 years in LHB. Of our 300+ band, only about 200 got to travel to away games.A  The travel band was heavy on brass because we could make more noise, so I was fortunate to be a trombone player. With his opulence of physique and temperament he seems to belong to a younger age than ours. She told me to get on her handlebars and I did because her eyes were the color of twilight if twilight had a gray. I didna€™t do it on purpose, but once I saw the shock on her face, I started collecting finales.
The only game I missed that year was at UCLA, and finances prevented the band from making the trip to California. His heartiness, his nimble play with words, his penchant for the theater, all stamp him as a belated Elizabethan. Move on to the important stuff.It's like a group who claims the sky is falling, using doctored data to "prove" it. We were frankly warned that we should make no discoveries; indeed if any had been anticipated, it was unlikely that the clearance would have been entrusted to inexperienced direction. 3 A Margaret Benson was born June 16, 1865, one of the six children of Edward White Benson.
Or in the case of global warming, government will force you to give it money, burden and tax industry with green regulation, and enjoy telling the rest of us what to do in perpetuity.As you read this, Democrats in Washington are planning a huge energy tax called cap-and-trade to "fight" climate change. I mean amphetamines didnE?t help, but she wouldna€™t have needed them if she made something other than kids.
The first of many, I'm sure, it will burden every citizen and business with higher costs of, literally, everything.Questions for the Tallahassee Democrat: Is what George Will says true?
He was first an assistant master at Rugby, then the first headmaster of the newly founded Wellington College.He rose in the service of the church as Chancellor of the diocese of Lincoln, Bishop of Truro and, finally, Archbishop of Canterbury. Did Phil Jones of the Climatic Research Unit admit there's been no warming in 15 years or that the earth was warmer during the Medieval Warm Period? Did the IPCC retract its assertion that Himalayan glaciers are melting?Then, why doesn't the Democrat report on it?
Benson was a learned man with a wide knowledge of history and a serious concern for the education of the young.
He was also something of a poet and one of his hymns is still included in the American Episcopal Hymnal.
Life pulls into a station, you wait for the next bus to come along, or you take it where it goes.
Arthur Christopher, the eldest, was first a master at Eton and then at Magdalen College, Cambridge. I mean, Hank and me werena€™t something to be ashamed of, but she knew my being able to sing wasna€™t something she did. A noted author and poet with an enormous literary output, he published over fifty books, most of an inspirational nature, but he was also the author of monographs on D. The state Senate last week approved a 294-percent increase in the state cigarette tax, and unless the House or Gov.
Crist rejects the plan, it will punish the very taxpayers the stimulus package purported to save.A A cigarette tax increase is a regressive tax hike on the state's low-income population during a devastating recession. Florida smokers' median household income is almost $10,000 less per year than that of Florida nonsmokers.
He helped to edit the correspondence of Queen Victoria for publication, contributed poetry to The Yellow Book, and wrote the words to the anthem "Land of Hope and Glory". Most important to the study of the excavator of the Mut Temple, he was the author of The Life and Letters of Maggie Benson, 4 a sympathetic biography which helps to shed some light on her short archaeological career. In some of the state's poorest counties, the cost of cigarettes will surpass 5 percent of household income.A Cigarette tax increases also have detrimental effects on nonsmokers by damaging the larger economy.
Raising the price of a pack of cigarettes higher than those found in bordering states promises to not only repel out-of-state consumers but drive Florida citizens over the state border, where prices are lower. Retailers are justifiably clamoring to defeat the tax hike, because they see sales evaporating as customers buy their cigarettes in Georgia and Alabama, where a carton will cost almost $10 less. He also wrote several reminiscences of his family in which he included his sister and described his involvement in her excavations. He helped to supervise part of the work and he prepared the plan of the temple which was used in her eventual publication. The price advantage that Florida's retailers enjoyed will go up in smoke if this tax hike happens.A Florida Senators are lauding the $1-per-pack hike as a victory for both balanced budgets and anti-smoking initiatives, but the reality is a cigarette tax increase cannot achieve both.
His younger brother, Robert Hugh Benson, took Holy Orders in the Church of England, later converted to Roman Catholicism and was ordained a priest in that rite.
He also achieved some fame as a novelist and poet and rose to the position of Papal Chamberlain. Any drop among in-state cigarette purchases goes hand-in-hand with a reduction in tax revenues, leaving another gaping budget hole in the future. As growing numbers of Florida smokers buy their cigarettes somewhere else, revenue projections will not be met. Between FY 2002 and FY 2007, state cigarette taxes were increased 57 times; 39 of those increases yielded revenues that fell short of predictions. Her publication of the excavation is cited in every reference to theTemple of Mut in the Egyptological literature, but she is known to history as a name in a footnote and little else.A Margaret Benson was born at Wellington College during her father's tenure as headmaster. In New Jersey, cigarette tax revenue actually declined after a tax hike there, with revenues falling 181 percent short of expectations. Each career advancement for him meant a move for the family so her childhood was spent in a series of official residences until she went to Oxford in 1883. A study by the National Taxpayers Union found that, after 35 tobacco tax hikes between 2004 and 2006, 22 states followed up with other tax increases.For those of you keeping score at home, cigarette taxes are bad for smokers, nonsmokers, the poor, retailers, the government and anyone who cares about the state's economy. She was eighteen when she was enrolled at Lady Margaret Hall, a women's college founded only four years before. It appears the only people these tax hikes benefit are the misinformed, who will change their tune soon enough.The fact that any tax hikes are on the table is preposterous. One of her tutors commented to his sister that he was sorry Margaret had not been able to read for "Greats" in the normal way. Florida expects to receive a $13 billion infusion from the federal government as part of President Obama's stimulus package. 5 When she took a first in the Women's Honours School of Philosophy, he said, "No one will realize how brilliantly she has done." 6 Since her work was not compared to that of her male contemporaries, it would have escaped noticed. In her studies she concentrated on political economy and moral sciences but she was also active in many aspects of the college. She participated in dramatics, debating and sports but her outstanding talent was for drawing and painting in watercolor. Her skill was so superior he thought she should be appointed drawing mistress if she remained at Lady Margaret Hall for any length of time. She began a work titled "The Venture of Rational Faith" which occupied her thoughts for many years. We need a government that will encourage entrepreneurs and preserve property rights, thus allowing citizens to invest in America.A This is what has made America great a€” letting one choose his or her own destiny.
From the titles alone they suggest a young woman who was deeply concerned with problems of society and the spirit and this preoccupation with the spiritual was to be one of her concerns throughout the rest of her life.
In some of her letters from Egypt it is clear that she was attempting to understand something of the spiritual life of the ancient Egyptians, not a surprising interest for the daughter of a churchman like Edward White Benson.
But keeping people employed through government jobs at the taxpayers' expense will not stimulate the economy. A In 1885, at the age of twenty, Margaret was taken ill with scarlet fever while at Zermatt in Switzerland. Government should reduce jobs, just as the private sector does.A This brings me to ask why we, the citizens of Leon County and Tallahassee, are being hit with so many fees in these troubled times?
By the time she was twenty-five she had developed the symptoms of rheumatism and the beginnings of arthritis. Are citizens here obligated to furnish local-government employees with a better lifestyle by imposing fees while local businesses are hurting for sales?
She made her first voyage to Egypt in 1894 because the warm climate was considered to be beneficial for those who suffered from her ailments.
What's next?A The city and county should first look at the situation we have now, which is an ex-fire chief managing the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and a fire chief managing the Tallahassee Fire Department. Wintering in Egypt was highly recommended at the time for a wide range of illnesses ranging from simple asthma to "mental strain." Lord Carnarvon, Howard Carter's sponsor in the search for the tomb of Tutankhamun, was one of the many who went to Egypt for reasons of health.
After Cairo and Giza she went on by stages as far as Aswan and the island temples of Philae. She commented on the "wonderful calm" of the Great Sphinx, the physical beauty of the Nubians, the color of the stone at Philae, the descent of the cataract by boat, which she said was "not at all dangerous".
Taxpayers are covering the cost now, and taxpayers have always paid for fire protection through their property taxes.In the 1960s, '70s, '80s and '90s, property taxes paid for local government without the fees we are faced with today.
By the end of January she was established in Luxor with a program of visits to the monuments set out.
I don't feel as if I should have really had an idea of Egypt at all if I hadn't stayed here -- the Bas-reliefs of kings in chariots are only now beginning to look individual instead of made on a pattern, and the immensity of the whole thing is beginning to dawn -- and the colours, oh my goodness! The ancient language and script she found fascinating but she was not as interested in reading classical Arabic.
Her interest was maintained by the variety of animal and bird life for at home in England she had been surrounded by domestic animals and had always been keen on keeping pets. By the time her first stay ended in March, 1894, she had already resolved to return in the fall. When Margaret returned to Egypt in November she had already conceived the idea of excavating a site and thus applied to the Egyptian authorities. Edouard Naville, the Swiss Egyptologist who was working at the Temple of Hatshepsut at Dier el Bahri for the Egypt Exploration Fund, wrote to Henri de Morgan, Director of the Department of Antiquities, on her behalf. From her letters of the time, it is clear that this was one of the most exciting moments of Margaret Benson's life because she was allowed to embark on what she considered a great adventure. A Margaret's physical condition at the beginning of the excavation was of great concern to the family. A Margaret Benson had no particular training to qualify or prepare her for the job but what she lacked in experience she more than made up for with her "enthusiastic personality" and her intellectual curiosity. In the preface to The Temple of Mut in Asher she said that she had no intention of publishing the work because she had been warned that there was little to find.
It appears that, like spoiled children, these '60s leftovers care not about anything except their own power. In the introduction to The Temple of Mut in Asher acknowledgments were made and gratitude was offered to a number of people who aided in the work in various ways. The professional Egyptologists and archaeologists included Naville, Petrie, de Morgan, Brugsch, Borchardt, Daressy, Hogarth and especially Percy Newberry who translated the inscriptions on all of the statues found. Lea), 10 a Colonel Esdaile, 11 and Margaret's brother, Fred, helped in the supervision of the work in one or more seasons. A It is usually assumed that Margaret Benson and Janet Gourlay worked only as amateurs, with little direction and totally inexperienced help.
It is clear from the publication that Naville helped to set up the excavation and helped to plan the work. Hogarth 12 gave advice in the direction of the digging and Newberry was singled out for his advice, suggestions and correction as well as "unwearied kindness." Margaret's brother, Fred, helped his inexperienced sister by supervising some of the work as well as making a measured plan of the temple which is reproduced in the publication. Did Phil Jones of the Climatic Research Unit admit there's been no warming in 15 years or that the earth was warmer during the Medieval Warm Period? Did the IPCC retract its assertion that Himalayan glaciers are melting?Then, why doesn't the Democrat report on it?
Benson) was qualified to help because he had intended to pursue archaeology as a career, studied Classical Languages and archaeology at Cambridge, and was awarded a scholarship at King's College on the basis of his work. He organized a small excavation at Chester to search for Roman legionary tomb stones built into the town wall and the results of his efforts were noticed favorably by Theodore Mommsen, the great nineteenth century classicist, and by Mr. Benson went on to excavate at Megalopolis in Greece for the British School at Athens and published the result of his work in the Journal of Hellenic Studies. His first love was Greece and its antiquities and it is probable that concern for his sister's health was a more important reason for him joining the excavation than an interest in the antiquities of Egypt. Florida smokers' median household income is almost $10,000 less per year than that of Florida nonsmokers.
13A It is interesting to speculate as to why a Victorian woman was drawn to the Temple of Mut.
The precinct of the goddess who was the consort of Amun, titled "Lady of Heaven", and "Mistress of all the Gods", is a compelling site and was certainly in need of further exploration in Margaret's time.
Its isolation and the arrangement with the Temple of Mut enclosed on three sides by its own sacred lake made it seem even more romantic. 14 When she began the excavation three days was considered enough time to "do" the monuments of Luxor and Margaret said that few people could be expected to spend even a half hour at in the Precinct of Mut.
A On her first visit to Egypt in 1894 she had gone to see the temple because she had heard about the granite statues with cats' heads (the lion-headed images of Sakhmet). The donkey-boys knew how to find the temple but it was not considered a "usual excursion" and after her early visits to the site she said that "The temple itself was much destroyed, and the broken walls so far buried, that one could not trace the plan of more than the outer court and a few small chambers".
15 The Precinct of the Goddess Mut is an extensive field of ruins about twenty-two acres in size, of which Margaret had chosen to excavate only the central structure.
Connected to the southernmost pylons of the larger Amun Temple of Karnak by an avenue of sphinxes, the Mut precinct contains three major temples and a number of smaller structures in various stages of dilapidation. She noted some of these details in her initial description of the site, but in three short seasons she was only able to work inside the Mut Temple proper and she cleared little of its exterior.
Serious study of the temple complex was started at least as early as the expedition of Napoleon at the end of the eighteenth century when artists and engineers attached to the military corps measured the ruins and made drawings of some of the statues. During the first quarter of the nineteenth century, the great age of the treasure hunters in Egypt, Giovanni Belzoni carried away many of the lion-headed statues and pieces of sculpture to European museums. Champollion, the decipherer of hieroglyphs, and Karl Lepsius, the pioneer German Egyptologist, both visited the precinct, copied inscriptions and made maps of the remains.16 August Mariette had excavated there and believed that he had exhausted the site. Florida expects to receive a $13 billion infusion from the federal government as part of President Obama's stimulus package. Most of the travelers and scholars who had visited the precinct or carried out work there left some notes or sketches of what they saw and these were useful as references for the new excavation. Since some of the early sources on the site are quoted in her publication, Margaret was obviously aware of their existence. 17A On her return to Egypt at the end of November, 1894, she stopped at Mena House hotel at Giza and for a short time at Helwan, south of Cairo. Helwan was known for its sulphur springs and from about 1880 it had become a popular health resort, particularly suited for the treatment of the sorts of maladies from which Margaret suffered. People at every turn asked if she remembered them and her donkey-boy almost wept to see her. A "On January 1st, 1895, we began the excavation" -- with a crew composed of four men, sixteen boys (to carry away the earth), an overseer, a night guardian and a water carrier.
The largest the work gang would be in the three seasons of excavation was sixteen or seventeen men and eighty boys, still a sizable number. Before the work started Naville came to "interview our overseer and show us how to determine the course of the work". A A good part of Margaret's time was occupied with learning how to supervise the workmen and the basket boys.
Since her spoken Arabic was almost nonexistent, she had to use a donkey-boy as a translator. It would have been helpful if she had had the opportunity to work on an excavation conducted by a professional and profit from the experience but she was eager to learn and had generally good advice at her disposal so she proceeded in an orderly manner and began to clear the temple.
But keeping people employed through government jobs at the taxpayers' expense will not stimulate the economy.
On the second of January she wrote to her mother: "I don't think much will be found of little things, only walls, bases of pillars, and possibly Cat-statues.
I shall feel rather like --'Massa in the shade would lay While we poor niggers toiled all day' -- for I am to have a responsible overseer, and my chief duty apparently will be paying.
18A She is described as riding out from the Luxor Hotel on donkey-back with bags of piaster pieces jingling for the Saturday payday.
What's next?A The city and county should first look at the situation we have now, which is an ex-fire chief managing the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and a fire chief managing the Tallahassee Fire Department.
She had been warned to pay each man and boy personally rather than through the overseer to reduce the chances of wages disappearing into the hands of intermediaries.
The workmen believed that she was at least a princess and they wanted to know if her father lived in the same village as the Queen of England. When they sang their impromptu work songs (as Egyptian workmen still do) they called Margaret the "Princess" and her brother Fred the "Khedive".
A PART II: THE EXCAVATIONSA The clearance was begun in the northern, outer, court of the temple where Mariette had certainly worked.
Earth was banked to the north side of the court, against the back of the ruined first pylon but on the south it had been dug out even below the level of the pavement. Mariette's map is inaccurate in a number of respects suggesting that he was not able to expose enough of the main walls. At the first (northern) gate it was necessary for Margaret Benson to clear ten or twelve feet of earth to reach the paving stones at the bottom.
In the process they found what were described as fallen roofing blocks, a lion-headed statue lying across and blocking the way, and also a small sandstone head of a hippopotamus.
In the clearance of the court the bases of four pairs of columns were found, not five as on Mariette's map. After working around the west half of the first court and disengaging eight Sakhmet statues in the process, they came on their first important find.
Near the west wall of the court, was discovered a block statue of a man named Amenemhet, a royal scribe of the time of Amenhotep II. The statue is now in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo 19 but Margaret was given a cast of it to take home to England. When it was discovered she wrote to her father: A My Dearest Papa, We have had such a splendid find at the Temple of Mut that I must write to tell you about it.
We were just going out there on Monday, when we met one of our boys who works there running to tell us that they had found a statue.
When we got there they were washing it, and it proved to be a black granite figure about two feet high, knees up to its chin, hands crossed on them, one hand holding a lotus. 20A The government had appointed an overseer who spent his time watching the excavation for just such finds. He reported it to a sub-inspector who immediately took the block statue away to a store house and locked it up. He said it was hard that Margaret should not have "la jouissance de la statue que vous avez trouve" and she was allowed to take it to the hotel where she could enjoy it until the end of the season when it would become the property of the museum. The statue had been found on the pavement level, apparently in situ, suggesting to the excavator that this was good evidence for an earlier dating for the temple than was generally believed at the time. The presence of a statue on the floor of a temple does not necessarily date the temple, but many contemporary Egyptologists might have come to the same conclusion. One visitor to the site recalled that a party of American tourists were perplexed when Margaret was pointed out to them as the director of the dig.
At that moment she and a friend were sitting on the ground quarreling about who could build the best sand castle.
This was probably not the picture of an "important" English Egyptologist that the Americans had expected. A As work was continued in the first court other broken statues of Sakhmet were found as well as two seated sandstone baboons of the time of Ramesses III. 21 The baboons went to the museum in Cairo, a fragment of a limestone stela was eventually consigned to a store house in Luxor and the upper part of a female figure was left in the precinct where it was recently rediscovered. The small objects found in the season of 1895 included a few coins, a terra cotta of a reclining "princess", some beads, Roman pots and broken bits of bronze.
Time was spent repositioning Sakhmet statues which appeared to be out of place based on what was perceived as a pattern for their arrangement. Even if they were correct they could not be sure that they were reconstructing the original ancient placement of the statues in the temple or some modification of the original design. In the spirit of neatness and attempting to leave the precinct in good order, they also repaired some of the statues with the aid of an Italian plasterer, hired especially for that purpose. A Margaret was often bed ridden by her illnesses and she was subject to fits of depression as well but she and her brother Fred would while away the evenings playing impromptu parlor games.
For a fancy dress ball at the Luxor Hotel she appeared costumed as the goddess Mut, wearing a vulture headdress which Naville praised for its ingenuity.
If Nader hadn't drawn 90,000 Florida votes in 2000, the reasoning goes, a handful of his supporters might have closed their eyes, swallowed hard and voted for Al Gore a€” probably closing the 537-vote gap by which Bush carried the state.
The resources in the souk of Luxor for fancy dress were nonexistent but Margaret was resourceful enough to find material with which to fabricate a costume based, as she said, on "Old Egyptian pictures." A The results of the first season would have been gratifying for any excavator. In a short five weeks the "English Lady" had begun to clear the temple and to note the errors on the older plans available to her.
She had started a program of reconstruction with the idea of preserving some of the statues of Sakhmet littering the site.
She had found one statue of great importance and the torso of another which did not seem so significant to her.
Her original intention of digging in a picturesque place where she had been told there was nothing much to be found was beginning to produce unexpected results.A The Benson party arrived in Egypt for the second season early in January of 1896. After a trip down to, they reached Luxor Aswan around the twenty-sixth and the work began on the thirtieth. A Imagine Clinton or Obama (maybe Clinton and Obama) versus McCain or Mitt Romney or Mike Huckabee next fall. That day Margaret was introduced to Janet Gourlay who had come to assist with the excavation. The beginning of the long relationship between "Maggie" Benson and "Nettie" Gourlay was not signaled with any particular importance.
By May of the same year she was to write (also to her mother): "I like her more and more -- I haven't liked anyone so well in years". Once again, the Democrats will be the peace party while the Republicans defend their policies. Miss Benson and Miss Gourlay seemed to work together very well and to share similar reactions and feelings.
They were to remain close friends for much of Margaret's life, visiting and travelling together often. Their correspondence reflects a deep mutual sympathy and Janet was apparently much on Margaret's mind because she often mentioned her friend in writing to others. After her relationship with Margaret Benson she faded into obscurity and even her family has been difficult to trace, although a sister was located a few years ago. A For the second season in 1896 the work staff was a little larger, with eight to twelve men, twenty-four to thirty-six boys, a rais (overseer), guardians and the necessary water carrier. With the first court considered cleared in the previous season, work was begun at the gate way between the first and second courts. A It's probably too much to hope for, but the best-known leaders in both Florida political parties are being mentioned for vice president. An investigation was made of the ruined wall between these two courts and the conclusion was drawn that it was "a composite structure" suggesting that part of the wall was of a later date than the rest.
The wall east of the gate opening is of stone and clearly of at least two building periods while the west side has a mud brick core faced on the south with stone. Charlie Crist's well-timed endorsement of McCain raised his running-mate ratings in the GOP. Margaret thought the west half of the wall to be completely destroyed because it was of mud brick which had never been replaced by stone. She found the remains of "more than one row of hollow pots" which she thought had been used as "air bricks" in some later rebuilding.
Bill Nelson, having won four times in a state with 27 electoral votes, should be on the short list of either Democrat. Originally built of mud brick, like many of the structures in the Precinct of Mut, the south face of both halves of the wall was sheathed with stone one course thick no later than the Ramesside Period. They're affable and telegenic, but they have shown they can be tough, capable campaigners. During the Ptolemaic Period the core of the east half of the mud brick wall was replaced with stone but the Ramesside sheathing was retained. Here the untrained excavator was beginning to understand some of the problems of clearing a temple structure in Egypt.
Mariette's plan of the second chamber probably seemed accurate after a superficial examination so a complete clearing seemed unnecessary. Other fragments were found and the original height of the seated statue was estimated between fourteen and sixteen feet high.
The following year de Morgan, the Director General of the Department of Antiquities, ordered the head sent to the museum in Cairo The finding of the large lion head is mentioned in a letter from Margaret to her mother dated February 9, 1896, 22. On the other hand, gay-marriage proponents, who have pushed this issue in the courts and legislatures from Hawaii to Massachusetts, seem startled and offended when their cause runs into resistance. In the same letter she also mentions the discovery of a statue of Ramesses II on the day before the letter was written. 23.Her published letters often give exact or close dates of discoveries whereas her later publication in the Temple of Mut in Asher was an attempt at a narrative of the work in some order of progression through the temple and dates are often lacking. About the same time that the giant lion head was found some effort was made to raise a large cornerstone block but a crowbar was bent and a rope was broken.
The end result of the activity is not explained at that point and the location of the corner not given but it can probably be identified with the southeast cornerstone of the Mut Temple mentioned later in a description of the search for foundation deposits. A Somewhere near the central axis of the second court, but just inside the gateway, they came on the upper half of a royal statue with nemes headdress and the remains of a false beard.
There had been inscriptions on the shoulder and back pillar but these had been methodically erased. Ulysses Grant's drinking, Abraham Lincoln supposedly joked that he would find out what kind of liquor Grant liked and send a case to each of his other generals.
The lower half was found a little later and it was possible to reconstruct an over life-sized, nearly complete, seated statue of a king. Well, Leon County has always had totally clean elections a€” zero defects in the recounts, readily certifiable results, relatively short lines, few if any complaints from candidates. The excavators published it as "possibly" Tutankhamun, an identification not accepted today, and it is still to be seen, sitting to the east of the gateway, facing into the second court.24 A large statue of Sakhmet was also found, not as large as the colossal head, but larger than the other figures still in the precinct and in most Egyptian collections. Even in the post-presidential merriment of 2000, Ion Sancho's office stood out from the rest of Florida. It was also reconstructed and left in place, on the west side of the doorway where it is one of the most recognizable landmarks in the temple. So now Sancho is investigating allegations of drinking on primary night by some of his employees. In the clearance of the second court a feature described as a thin wall built out from the north wall was found in the northeast corner.
Considering how well our elections have run, maybe he ought to find out what they were drinking and send a case to colleagues in some other counties.
It was later interpreted by the nineteenth century excavators as part of the arrangement for a raised cloister and it was not until recent excavation that it was identified as the lower part of the wall of a small chapel, built against the north wall of the court. The process of determining any sequence of the levels in the second court was complicated by the fact that it had been worked over by earlier treasure hunters and archaeologists. In some cases statues were found below the original floor level, leading to the assumption that some pieces had fallen, broken the pavement, and sunk into the floor of their own weight.
It is more probable that the stone floors had been dug out and undermined in the search for antiquities.
A An attempt was made to put the area in order for future visitors as the excavation progressed.
This included the reconstruction of some of the statues as found and the moving of others in a general attempt to neaten the appearance of the temple. Other finds made in the second court included inscribed blocks too large to move or reused in parts of walls still standing. The statue identified as Ramesses II, mentioned in Margaret's letter of February 9, was found on the southwest side of the court, near the center.
It was a seated figure in pink granite, rather large in size, but when it was completely uncovered it was found to be broken through the middle with the lower half in an advanced state of disintegration. The upper part was in relatively good condition except for the left shoulder and arm and it was eventually awarded to the excavators.
A Mention was also made of several small finds from the second court including a head of a god in black stone and part of the vulture headdress from a statue of a goddess or a queen. The recent ongoing excavations carried out by the Brooklyn Museum have revealed a female head with traces of a vulture headdress as well as a number of fragments of legs and feet which suggest that the head of the god found by Margaret Benson was from a pair statue representing Amun and Mut. Another important discovery she made on the south side of the court was a series of sandstone relief blocks representing the arrival at Thebes of Nitocris, daughter of Psamtik I, as God's Wife of Amun.25A At some time during the season Margaret was made aware of the possibility that foundation deposits might still be in place. These dedicatory deposits were put down at the time of the founding of a structure or at a time of a major rebuilding, and they are often found under the cornerstones, the thresholds or under major walls, usually in the center. They contain a number of small objects including containers for food offerings, model tools and model bricks or plaques inscribed with the name of the ruler. The importance of finding such a deposit in the Temple of Mut was obvious to Margaret because it would prove to everyone's satisfaction who had built the temple, or at least who had made additions to it. A They first looked for foundation deposits in the middle of the gateway between the first and second courts. At the same time another part of the crew was clearing the innermost rooms in the south part of the temple. Under the central of the three chambers they discovered a subterranean crypt with an entrance so small that it had to be excavated by "a small boy with a trowel". This chamber has been re-cleared in recent years and proved to be a small rectangular room with traces of an erased one-line text around the four walls. In antiquity the access seems to have been hidden by a paving stone which had to be lifted each time the room was entered.
A The search for foundation deposits continued in the southeast corner of the temple (probably the place where the crowbar was bent and the rope broken). Again no deposit was found but in digging around the cornerstone, below the original ground level, they began to find statues and fragments of statues.
As the earth continued to yield more and more pieces of sculpture, Legrain arrived from the Amun Temple, where he was supervising the excavation, and announced his intention to take everything away to the storehouse. Aside from the pleasure of the find, it was important to have the objects at hand for study, comparison and the copying of inscriptions. With the interviews to begin in FSU's athletic-director search, did you know that the first FSU AD was a woman? Montgomery entered Florida State College for Women, she found there was no provision for recreation for women students outside of a couple of tennis courts. Some said it was not quite ladylike for women to take physical education and was a hazard to the health of women to take violent exercises. When FSCW became FSU and men were enrolled, a football team was organized, and of course a (male) coach was hired.
Montgomery had a doctorate in physical education, and the coach had only a bachelor's degree, she still remained head of the department of physical education.




How to get your ex girlfriend to like you again over text 911
5 ways to get my ex back quotes


Comments

  • NEQATIF, 03.04.2016 at 10:33:32

    I m dwelling nicely now, am enjoying system requires 30-days sort of contact you.
  • BEZPRIDEL, 03.04.2016 at 14:28:27

    Gf's that she cant consider you truthful to the individual you.
  • RAMIL_GENCLIK, 03.04.2016 at 14:53:45

    When i go and attempt to see her, and if she.
  • Vefa, 03.04.2016 at 22:29:45

    Needed to stop loving i wanted desires to be pals nonetheless and.
  • Admin, 03.04.2016 at 18:25:22

    Over the bad break up and bad image inside you'll.