Changing name after marriage letter template,the secret life of the cat youtube 2014,secret websites to watch free movies nyc,the secret ebook download rhonda byrne 97.5 - Plans On 2016

30.03.2016
To understand ourselves it is important to understand our ancestors, and a part of them, and their heritage, lives on in us today. To the world the American Indians seemed like a forgotten people when the English colonists first arrived and began to occupy their lands. I want to give special thanks to my cousin, Mary Hilliard, for her assistance and encouragement in researching and preparing this book. Wherever possible I have tried to find at least two sources for the genealogical data, but this has not always been possible. I have also found Franklin Elewatum Bearce's history, Who Our Forefathers Really Were, A True Narrative of Our White and Indian Ancestors, to be very helpful. It is certainly possible that such a record may contain errors, but it is also very fortunate that we have access to this record as it presents firsthand knowledge of some of the individuals discussed in this book. 8 Newcomba€? Cpt. Sometime before the colonial period, the Iroquoian tribes began moving from the southern plains eastward across the Mississippi River and then northeasterly between the Appalachians and the Ohio River Valley, into the Great Lakes region, then through New York and down the St.
Though they were neighbors and had similar skin color, these two groups of Indians were as dissimilar as the French and the Germans in Europe. Federations, as well as the individual tribes, were fluid organizations to the extent that the sachem was supported as long as he had the strength to maintain his position. Belonging to a federation meant that an annual tribute had to be sent to support the great sachem and his household, warriors had to be sent if he called for a given number to go to war, and strictest obedience and fidelity was demanded. Some of these federations had as many as thirty member tribes supporting their Great Sachem, although many of these tribes would be counted by more than one sachem, as any tribe that was forced to pay tribute was considered as part of that Great Sachem's federation.
Any member of the society who dishonored himself, in anyway, was no longer worthy of the respect of his people. When viewing the typical Indians of America, one would describe them as having a dark brown skin. They wore relatively little clothing, especially in summer, although the women were usually somewhat more modest than the men. The English resented the fact that the Indians wouldn't convert to Christianity as soon as the missionaries came among them. The various tribes of New England spoke basically the same language and could understand each other well. There are many words used commonly in our language today that were learned from these New England Indians: Squaw, wigwam, wampum, pow-wow, moccasin, papoose, etc. Today there is little doubt that prior to Columbus's voyage, the Norsemen sailed to the coast of North America early in the eleventh century. We do not have a record of all of the European contact and influence on the Indians in the early years of exploration because the greatest exposure came from the early European fishermen and trappers who kept no records of their adventures, as opposed to the explorers. In 1524, Giovanni da Verrazano wrote the first known description of a continuous voyage up the eastern coast of North America. As the fur trade became increasingly more important to Europeans, they relied heavily on the Indians to do the trapping for them. Another problem with which the Indians had to contend was the White man's diseases for which they had no tolerance nor immunity. In the spring of 1606, Gorges sent Assacumet and Manida, as guides on a ship with Captain Henry Chalons, to New England to search for a site for a settlement. In 1614, Captain John Smith, who had already been involved in the colony at James Town, Virginia, was again commissioned to take two ships to New England in search of gold, whales or anything else of value. Dermer wanted to trade with the local Indians of the Wampanoag Federation and asked Squanto if he would guide them and be their interpreter. Derner was given safe passage through Wampanoag land by Massasoit and soon returned to his ship. When the Pilgrims left England in the Mayflower, their stated intent was to establish a settlement on the mouth of the Hudson River, at the site of present day New York City. The Pilgrims returned to the Mayflower and, after many days of exploration, found a more suitable location.
On March 16, 1621 the Pilgrims were surprised by a tall Indian who walked boldly into the plantation crying out, "Welcome! The Pilgrims gestured for Massasoit to join them in their fort but, he in turn, gestured for them to come to him. When the amenities were ended, the English brought out a treaty they had prepared in advance, which specified that the Wampanoags would be allies to the English in the event of war with any other peoples and that they would not harm one-another; and that when any Indians came to visit the plantation they would leave their weapons behind. After the ceremonies were ended, Governor Carver escorted Massasoit to the edge of the settlement and waited there for the safe return of Winslow.
Part of Massasoit's willingness to make an alliance with the English must be credited to his weakened condition after suffering from the recent epidemics which left his followers at about half of the strength of his enemies, the Narragansetts.
In June of 1621, about three months after the signing of the treaty, a young boy from the Colony was lost in the woods. When the English could not find the boy, Governor William Bradford, (who replaced John Carver, who died in April) sent to Massasoit for help in locating the boy. That summer Governor Bradford sent Edward Winslow and Stephen Hopkins, with Squanto, to Pokanoket (Massasoit's own tribe, on the peninsula where Bristol, R.I.
From this trip of Winslow's, we learn more about the daily life of the Indians in this area. Massasoit urged his guests to stay longer but they insisted they must return to Plymouth before the Sabbath. Less than a month following this visit, Massasoit sent Hobomock, a high ranking member of the Wampanoag Council, to Plymouth to act as his ambassador and to aid the Pilgrims in whatever way they needed. Hobomock and Squanto were surprised at what they heard, and quietly withdrew from the camp to Squanto's wigwam but were captured there before they could get to Plymouth. Although the Narragansetts and Wampanoags were historical enemies and continually feuding over land, they did not usually put hostages of high rank to death.
Normally, treason was punishable by death and Massasoit would certainly have been justified in executing Corbitant for his part in the plot against him but, for some reason, Massasoit complete forgave him. Their first harvest was not a large one but the Pilgrims were.happy to have anything at all. During the winter, a rivalry developed between Squanto and Hobomock, the two Indians who now lived continually at Plymouth.
According to the treaty he had signed with Plymouth, they were to turn over to him any Indians guilty of offense. In June and July, three ships arrived at Plymouth with occupants who expected to be taken in and cared for.
In the winter of 1622-23, Governor William Bradford made trips to the various Indian tribes around Cape Cod to buy food to keep the Pilgrims from starvation.
Next, Standish went to Cummaquid (Barnstable, MA.) where Iyanough was Sachem of the Mattachee Tribe. Thinking that Massasoit was dead, they went instead to Pocasset, where they sought Corbitant who, they were sure, would succeed Massasoit as the next Great Sachem. Winslow describes their arrival, where the Indians had gathered so closely that it took some effort to get through the crowd to the Great Sachem. Since the Pow-wow's medicine had not produced any results, Winslow asked permission to try to help the ailing Sachem. Their second Thanksgiving was combined with the wedding celebration of Governor Bradford and Alice Southworth. Because of Massasoit's honored position, more was recorded of him than of other Indians of his time.
Massasoit most likely became Sachem of the Pokanokets, and Great Sachem of the Wampanoags, between 1605-1615. The second son of Massasoit was Pometacomet, (alias Pometacom, Metacom, Metacomet, Metacomo or Philip.) Philip was born in 1640, at least 16 years younger than Alexander. The third son, Sunconewhew, was sent by his Father to learn the white man's ways and to attend school at Harvard.
When his two oldest sons were old enough to marry, Massasoit made the arrangements for them to marry the two daughters of the highly regarded Corbitant, Sachem of the Pocasset tribe. The tribes of Cape Cod, Martha's Vineyard, Nantucket, as well as some of the Nipmuck tribes of central Massachusetts, looked to him for Military defense and leadership. Following the plagues of 1617, which reduced his nation so drastically and left his greatest enemy, the Narragansetts of Rhode Island, so unaffected, Massasoit was in a weakened position.


In 1632, following a battle with the Narragansetts in which he regained the Island of Aquidneck, Massasoit changed his name to Ousamequin (Yellow feather) sometimes spelled Wassamegon, Oosamequen, Ussamequen. In 1637, the English waged an unprovoked war of extermination against the Pequot Federation of Connecticut, which shocked both the Wampanoags and the Narragansetts so much that both Nations wanted to avoid hostilities with the feared English. After hearing of the death of his good friend, Edward Winslow in 1655, Massasoit realized that his generation was passing away.
As Massasoit's health began to decline, he turned more and more of the responsibilities over to Alexander who was a very capable leader and who was already leading the warriors on expedition against some of their enemies. Massasoit was succeeded, as Great Sachem, by his son Alexander, assisted by his brother, Philip. The younger generation saw, in Alexander, a strong, new leader who could see the danger of catering to the English.
Both Philip and Weetamoo were very vocal in their condemnation of the English and word of their accusations soon reached Plymouth. Together, Philip and Canonchet reasoned that it would take a great deal of preparation for such a war. Upon this discovery the energetic Dutch laid claim to the lands in what now are New Jersey and New York. Long before Hendryck Hudson ever went a-voyaging, nay before this doughty seaman shrilled his first baby cry, the a€?good and pleasant landa€? had been discovered, explored and settled by that immemorial legal process known as squattersa€Y rights.
The Unamis branch of the Lenni Lenape Indians lived along the river known as Manasquan and upon the Island since called a€?Osbornea€Ys.a€? They claimed the exclusive right to fish in and hunt along the tributaries of the river. The last Indian claimants to the land were known to the whites as Tom Store and Andrew Woolley. So, to the Indian exploration and hunting and fishing rights and to the doughty Dutch goes the honor of discovering not only the land, but the goodness and pleasantness and worthwhileness of this part of America for all those who should follow in the centuries to come. The white man, having discovered this part of the American Continent, and having come to the conclusion that it was truly a a€?good and pleasant land,a€? his fellows proceeded to draw the conclusion into reality. On the 8th day of April, 1665, Richard Nicholls, Esq., Governor under His Royal Highness, the Duke of York, of all his territories in America, signed a grant, which is known as the Monmouth Patent.
Governor and his executives, the Indians in their primitive dress, the settlers in the dull garb of the Quakers, Puritans, Long Island Dutch, and the Governor and his executives in the scarlet and Gold uniforms of their rank, made a memorable scene in the old State House in New York. This grant embraced parts of Middlesex and Ocean Counties and all of what is now Monmouth, except the Township of Upper Freehold and the western part of Millstone.
On June 24, 1664, the Duke of York had disposed of all his interests in the territory lying between the Hudson and the Delaware Rivers to Lord Berkeley and Sir George Carteret.
Philip Carteret at once gave proclamation of his Commission as Governor a€?under the new Lord Proprietorsa€?. The Proprietors claimed that the titles given by Governor Nicholls were void, to which the settlers demurred. Among those recorded in the record of a€?Quit-Rentsa€? and Patents are some interesting and familiar Monmouth County names: a€?Richard Hartshornea€”500 acres, January 18, 1685.
Bit by bit they cleared their land, made trails which became crude roads and in their habitations began to mingle in those social gatherings that have ever been the relaxation of those who live close to the soil and come to grips with nature. To say that our town has grown is to say something that seems silly, for years ago there was no town, just settlements or habitations scattered here and there singly or in neighborly fashion in the clearings in the forests or by the quiet river-side. By the time the fateful days of the Revolutionary war had rolled around, Manasquan Inlet had become a refuge for small boats and was by way of becoming a small sea port.
The Salt Works, which were scattered all along our coast, were the objects of depredation on the part of the British and their Tory allies. The charcoal industry was beginning to flourish and various trades and occupations which cause men to gather in groups for mutual help and convenience were being developed among the dwellers in the eastern end of Monmouth County.
But ever as late as 1815, there was no village of Manasquan and its site was a thick hickory wood, having a small clearing where the Osborn House once stood (near the intersection of present Main and South Streets). It seems that the first building that could properly be called the beginning of the town was built in 1808.
Soon after 1815, there was a tavern-house, the store of Jacob Curtis, the houses of Benjamin Pearce, William McKnight and David Curtis.
The only house of worship in this entire community at this time was the Quaker Meeting House,but this simple, beautiful faith flourished in the midst of world cares and concerns.
Thus, through all the years there has been a strong religious influence in and around Manasquan. A weekly mail route was established from Freehold to Toma€Ys River by way of a€?Old Squan Long Bridgea€? by Act of Congress on April 20th, 1818.
During the year 1854 a considerable interest was manifested toward having a postoffice at Squan, as the inhabitants were compelled to go two miles or more to Squan Bridge for their mail. I promised to write when god brought me to Jersey, but had not time till now; I shall give thee a brief account of the Country, no fiction, but the truth. The soile is generally black, and in some places a foot deep bearing great burthens of Corn, and Naurally bringeth forth English grass 2 years pleuching: the ground is tender, and the ploughing is very easie, the trees grow genrally not thick, but some places 10, in some 15, in some 25, or 30 upon an Acre. England, and I think feed much better, for they have Beef, Pork, Bacon, Pudding, Milk, Butter and good Beer; and Cyder for drink.
In 1796, John Havens (501), then called a€?senior,a€? purchased from James Allen for A?1,500 a tract of 250 acres of farmland, woodland and meadow between Metedeconk River and Kettle Creek and bordering on Barnegant Bay.
Through the large farm of John Havens, on Metedconk Neck, ran a road in an easterly-westerly direction, dividing the farm into not uneven parts.
1879 Same day, Charles and Augusta Schmidt sell Jersey City land to Sarah, of Mamakating, Sullivan Co.
At first I was very skeptical of this record as it was a family tradition passed down for many generations. She was very fond of her Grandmother, Freelove, knew all about her and stated on several occasions that Freelove's Mother was Sarah Mauwee, daughter of Joseph Mauwee, Sachem of Choosetown, and not Tabitha Rubbards (Roberts).
Massasoit was the Sachem of this tribe, as well as being the Great Sachem over the entire Wampanoag Federation, which consisted of over 30 tribes in central and southeastern Massachusetts, Cape Cod, Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket.
Welcome, Englishmen!" It was a cold and windy day, yet this Indian, who introduced himself as Samoset, Sachem of a tribe in Monhegan Island, Maine, wore only moccasins and a fringed loin skin.
Manasquan, Maniquan, Mannisquan, Manasquam, Squan and Squan Village are mentioned in various old records, among them a deed dated 1685.
They claimed a€zfrom the mouth of Squan River to the mouth of the Shrewsbury River, to the streams of each to their heads and across from one head to another.a€Y This claim was satisfactorily settled at a subsequent conference held at Easton, Pennsylvania, in October, 1758. The patentees were William Goulding, Samuel Spicer, John Bowne, Richard Gibbons, Richard Stout, James Grover, John Tilton, Nathaniel Sylvester, William Reape, Walter Clark, Nicholas Davies and Obadiah Holmes. Many of these had previously lived in the Colony of Massachusetts Bay and had left there on account of the religious persecution to which they had been subjected. By the terms of this document the title derived by the settlers from Governor Nicholls was absolutely ignored and they were required to take out new patents under the proprietors, whom they were to acknowledge as land-lords and to whom they were to pay stipulated quit-rents. Defiance, disputes, appeals, friction, riots, and imprisonments, covering many years and many changes of ownership, were the outcome. Hartshorne came to New Jersey from London in September 1779 and for a time resided at Wawake. There were a few exceptions, among whom was Indian Will, who fished and hunted from Shrewsbury to Barnegat, camping at various places.
By the middle of the last century, there were two stores, one kept by Hatsell (Hadsell?) and Curtis and the other by John Gifford. This route was from Freehold by Squankum, Manasquan (Manasquan here means large settlement in the vicinity of what is now the Route 70 Bridge over the Manasquan River), Toms River, Cedar Creek and Manahawkin to Tuckerton. In this movement, Osborn Curtis took a very active part and he became the unanimous choice of the people for post-master.
Haight established a stage coach service between the boat terminal at Red Bank and Manasquan. After a brief stop, the coach would proceed to the Trap-Tavern in Hamilton (at the intersection of Route 33 and Old Corlies Road) where the travelers usually had their lunch. When they are out of their time, they have land for themselves, and generally turn Farmours for themselves. This time, to Elizabeth Hill, who before her marriage had lived in Hopewell NJ and there had been a loyal member of the Baptist Church. Anna Havens and Samuel Havens, her step-children, were convicted of sin, and brought to a saving knowledge of the truth. At the death of their father, the eldest sons, Samuel and John, continued to occupy and farm these portions of the domain.


Clarissa bore John 10 children: Ephraim, John, Ann, William, Cynthia, Clarissa, Henry, Esther, George, and Walter. William Henry Havens (single), Mary (Havens) Wilson, Bradley Wilson her husband, Ann Nebecker and Henry Nebecker her husband, all of Payson, in the territory of Utah, the said William Henry Havens and Mary Wilson being the only children and heirs at law of John Havens, late of the County of Hudson, and the said Ann Nebecker being the widow of the said John Havens, did deed, on 6 Jul 1870, to Harvey M. John Hopper, guardian of minor Peter Smith Havens, appointed by Orphana€Ys Court on 19 Sep 1870, sold to Sarah Havens (Petera€Ys mother), on 10 Jan 1871, property in 12th Ward of Jersey City belonging to said minor.
Sarah Havens of Jersey City (formerly Hudson City) NJ, on 26 Aug 1874, bought from Charles H.
Sarah Havens, of Jersey City NJ, sold to Mary Josephine Wade, on 17 May 1877, land in Lot #3, in West Hoboken NJ, for $1600. Sarah Havens of Jersey City, Hudson, NJ, on 5 Apr 1877, sold land in Jersey City to Charles F. The patentees were William Goulding, Samuel Spicer, John Bowne, Richard Gibbons, Richard Stout, James Grover,A  John Tilton, Nathaniel Sylvester, William Reape, Walter Clark, Nicholas Davies and Obadiah Holmes. She obtained her copy of Zerviah Newcomb's Chronical from Zerviah's original diary, in the hands of Josiah 3rd himself. Nicholls, who was unaware of the transaction until the arrival of Philip Carteret, a brother of Sir George Carteret, late in the summer of the same year. He became interested in the Nichollsa€Y Patent controversy and in 1685, with several others, he took up 2500 acres of land on the coast, extending from a€?Rack Ponda€? on the North, to the head of Barnegat Bay, on the south. Landing in the river, they selected their home sites, cleared the land, built their homes in which they installed their families and few, and often scant possessions. Another Meeting House, the Old Free Church on the Hill (later to be known as the Ocean Mill (Hill) Methodist Protestant Church) was built in what is now Atlantic Cemetery. The coach then proceeded along country roads to Tiltona€Ys Tavern at Baileya€Ys Corner and thence to the Squan House at Manasquan, the end of an arduous daya€Ys journey.
It is scituate in a good Aire, which makes it healthy, and there is great conveniency for traveling from places throw the Province in Boats, from a small Canoe to Vessels of 30, 30, or 50 Tun, and in some places 100.
There is likewayes Gum tree, Cedar, White Wood, like our Fir tree; Walnuts Chestnuts and others lye thick upon the ground. I have sent for servants myself to settle a farme, for if the Proprietors will not do so, I see not what they can expect.
In the deed of purchase, a plot of A? acre a€?in the northwest corner of the orcharda€? was set aside for use as a burying ground.
Through this lady, the first Baptist Church in [that] section of the state was established in 1804.
Samuel thought of uniting with the Methodist Church, as there was no Baptist Church near, nor the most distant prospect of one being established. In the will of John Pieterse Van Houten (Marya€Ys father), he refers to her as a€?Polly, wife of Halmagh I. Some of the children may have been baptized in the Reformed Dutch Church at Ponds (now Oakland, Bergen County) which is closer than Pompton Plains, in Morris County, but unfortunately 150 years of Ponds Reformed Dutch Church records were destroyed by fire, so we do not have all the pertinent information about Halmagh and Pollya€Ys family. Bliss, of Hudson city, about 1.75 acres, for $1200, being the same premises conveyed by Garret Vreeland, his wife and others to John Havens by deed of 14 Apr 1856 and recorded in Deed Book 53, p.
Wynnkeep, County Auditor, sold to Eugene Stevenson, on 23 May 1881, Jersey City, land that formerly belonged to Sarah Havens, then living out of state.
Curtis went to Washington with his petition and after he had made known the grievances of the people to the Postmaster General, the request was granted. This entire tract of land had formerly belonged to John Allen, father of James Allen, and had been purchased by him from William Bills. She missed the services of the sanctuary and longed for a Baptist Church where she could worship.
He, however, was advised to accompany his step- mother to Hightstown, that they might take counsel of the Rev.
The second daughter, Ann (our direct ancestor), was born 24 Mar 1817 and married John Havens on 13 Feb 1839, in Bergen NJ. NJ to Thomas Andrews of Hudson, Hudson, NJ, on 23 Oct 1855, for a mortgage totaling $3,000.
Van Winkle and his wife Mary Ann, of Hudson, Hudson, NJ, sold 1.63 acres to John Havens for the sum of $1. Bearce's Great-aunt, Mary Caroline, lived with Josiah III and Freelove Canfield Bearce for several years, listened to their ancestral stories, and made her own personal copy of Zerviah's diary supplement. Lawrence to what is now known as Lake Champlain where his party killed several Mohawks in a show of European strength and musketry.
Thus we have one of the earliest, if not the earliest mention of the name of Manasquan, in American records.
They have sent over many servants, and are likewayes sending more; They have like wayes sent over many poor Families, and given them a small stock, and these Families, some some for 7, some for 10 years, give the half of their increase to the Landlord, except the milk, which the tennant hath to himself.
Peter Wilson, on the evening preceding the first Lorda€Ys Day in November 1801, and went directly to Mr. Other family members believe he married Rachel Baker on 8 Sep 1840, as there is a marriage record to that effect. She was divorced later because of her joining the Mormon Church and later married Henry Nebeker while preparing to move to Utah.
They had held property in trust that had been previously purchased by her husband John Havens. Beckham of Hoboken NJ, on 28 Jul 1879, land obtained from Edward Dubois in the city of West Hoboken, for $800. I wish thee would send over some to set up a Brew-house, and a Bake house to bake Bread and Bisket, for a Bisket-Maker we must have to vend our meat to the Plantations.
His wife, Rebecca Jeffrey, had died 6 years before, leaving four sons and one daughter, the eldest, Samuel, 19 years of age and the youngest, Abraham, a child of 3. Pollya€Ys grandfather, Pieter Adrianse Van Houten, was the grandson of Pieter Helmighse, who was the brother of Catlyntje Helmighse Van Houten, who married Johannes Gerritse Van Wagene--the youngest son of immigrants Gerrit Gerritse and Annetje Hermanse; thus making two direct lines back to Gerrit Gerritse and his wife, Annetje Hermanse, and two lines back to Helmigh Cornelise Van Houten and his wife, Jannetje Pieterse Marselise. The first two were sons: John Halmagh, (after his grandfather and father, according to Dutch tradition) and Henry R. The Chancellor decreed that within 30 days the defendants provide her a deed for the contested land.
New York, which I may need to pursue, since Sarah lived in New York at times.) Recorded in Deed Book 310, p.
A piece; and then to work they go, 2 or 3 men will in one year clear 50 acres, in some places 60, and in some more. He was also a member of the Legislature and instrumental in bringing the railroad to the Shore.
Wilson was sick and confined to bed; his sickness was so severe he could not converse with them.
Like her older sisters, she emigrated to Nauvoo and then moved on to Utah with the Mormon Pioneers. There was an immediate appeal on the grounds Sarah hadna€Yt fully paid for the property and that it was originally titled in the name of her husband John, but on 16 Mar 1876 that appeal was denied.
They sow Corn the first year, and afterwards maintain themselves; and the increase of Corn, Cows, Horses, Hogs and Sheep comes to the Landlord. I desire thee to encourage some of our Friends, especially the Proprietors, to send over some servants to stock some land: and when they have cleared it, if they have a mind to lett it, here are tenants to take it, and if they will sell it, here also are purchasers.
Now I have layd these things before thee, and desire thee to impart them to some of the Proprietors and other friends that they may consider of the same. Now I have layd these things before thee, and desire thee to impart them to someA  of the Proprietors and other friends that they may consider of the same. The whole was 1600 or 1800 acres, whereof only 120 acres were cleared, upon which he had a house, Garden and Orchard, and Barn planted: I know several men who lett cleared land at 6 shil. He further told them that Massasoit, the Great Sachem of the Wampanoags, was at Nemasket (a distance of about 15 miles) with many of his Counselors.



Tinkerbell secret of the wings dvd coupon
Secretary online full
Secret saturdays in ben 10 izle


Comments Changing name after marriage letter template

  1. Virus
    Reject or delay my meditation visa software, my plan of action optional, and are designed to nudge.
  2. ADRIANO
    The thought of mindfulness is to focus wish meditation guidance and journey others, nevertheless, changing name after marriage letter template can discover themselves.