By taking an active role in your community, you are helping to build a culture of preparedness in Canada. Emergency Preparedness Week is a national awareness initiative that has taken place annually since 1996. Set up a display at a local community centre, shopping mall, or school with free publications. Combine activities with local events coinciding with Emergency Preparedness Week and ask fire, police, ambulance, Search and Rescue, Canadian Red Cross, St.
Encourage emergency services (police, fire, etc.) to hold an Open House or to offer tours during EP Week.
Test emergency plans through an exercise or talk about what you would do if there were a power outage, flood, or other emergency, or if you had to evacuate.
Inform your workplace about EP Week by including the 3-Steps to Emergency Preparedness brochure with staff payroll stubs. Anna wanted to be better prepared for the flood season and decided to visit GetPrepared.ca to find information on how to prepare her family for the unexpected.
Want a practical presentation that will help make you and your community safer and better prepared to face a range of emergencies? Presenter notes: These notes provide supplementary information and activities for the group as you work through the slides. Your Emergency Preparedness Guide: This 72 Hours emergency preparedness guide can be downloaded for free. If you're the presenter, you may want to bring some kit items with you for the presentation. Share content from GetPrepared.ca on your Facebook page or on Twitter (see sample microblogging content below). A hashtag is a word or phrase (without spaces) following a hash symbol (#) used to tag a tweet on a particular topic of interest. Add the hashtag #EPWeek to your tweets to join the online conversation on emergency preparedness. Become an advocate for emergency preparedness by posting one of the images below to your website, blog, or social networking site (e.g.
We rely on technology more and more to keep in touch with our family, friends, and colleagues with a click of a button. Conserve your smartphone’s battery by reducing the screen’s brightness, placing your phone in airplane mode, and closing apps you are not using. The worldwide cost of natural disasters has skyrocketed from $2 billion in the 1980s, to $27 billion over the past decade. Canada’s first billion dollar disaster, the Saguenay flood of 1996, triggered a surge of water, rocks, trees and mud that forced 12,000 residents to evacuate their homes.
Approximately 85% of Canadians agree that having an emergency kit is important in ensuring their and their family’s safety, yet only 40% have prepared or bought an emergency kit. In 2011, flooding in Manitoba and Saskatchewan featured the highest water levels and flows in modern history.
Ice, branches or power lines can continue to break and fall for several hours after the end of an ice storm. The deadliest heat wave in Canadian history produced temperatures exceeding 44?C in Manitoba and Ontario in 1936.
In 2007, the Prairies experienced 410 severe weather events including tornadoes, heavy rain, wind and hail, nearly double the yearly average of 221 events. The coldest temperature reached in North America was –63?C, recorded in 1947 in Snag, Yukon. The largest landslide in Canada involved 185 million m3 of material and created a 40m deep scar that covered the size of 80 city blocks in 1894 at Saint-Alban, Quebec. Hurricanes are bigger and cause more widespread damage than tornadoes (a very large system can be up to 1,000 kilometres wide). One of the most destructive and disruptive storms in Canadian history was the 1998 ice storm in Eastern Canada causing hardship for 4 million people and costing $3 billion. The June 23, 2010 earthquake in Val-des-Bois, Quebec produced the strongest shaking ever experienced in Ottawa and was felt as far away as Kentucky in the United States. Using non-voice communication technology like text messaging, email, or social media instead of telephones takes up less bandwidth and helps reduce network congestion after an emergency. At the end of October 2012, Hurricane Sandy devastated parts of the Caribbean and the northeast of the North American continent. In a country that borders on three oceans and spans six time zones, creating an emergency response system that works for every region is a huge challenge.


Everyone responsible for Canada's emergency management system shares the common goal of preventing or managing disasters. Natural disasters may be beyond our control, but there are ways to reduce the risk and the impact of whatever emergency we might face - whether natural or human-induced. Emergency Preparedness Week (May 1-7, 2016) encourages Canadians to be prepared to cope on their own for at least the first 72 hours of an emergency while rescue workers help those in urgent need.
I encourage you to contact (name and number of emergency coordinator), our departmental emergency coordinator, and to visit the special display that we have put up at (location of booth) to learn about our role in emergency response.
By taking a few simple steps, you can become better prepared to face a range of emergencies – anytime, anywhere.
Know the risks – Although the consequences of disasters can be similar, knowing the risks specific to our community and our region can help you better prepare. 2. How many litres of water per day per person should you have in your basic emergency kit?
3. Which tool allows you to learn about historical information on disasters which have directly affected Canadians, at home and abroad, over the past century? 5. Which of the following items should NOT be included in a basic emergency supply kit?
Q2 - You can walk through moving flood waters as long as the water level is no higher than your waist.
False - One of the worst floods in Canada's history occurred in July 1996 in the Saguenay River Valley, in Quebec. True - Although the most powerful earthquakes occur near the Pacific Rim, there are a number of Canadian cities that are vulnerable to earthquakes, particularly Vancouver, Montreal, Ottawa, Victoria and Quebec City. False - Tornadoes occur most often in the spring and during the summer, but they may form any time of the year. True - In June, most hail storms occur in southern Canada and the north central United States. This fun game is designed to raise awareness about emergency preparedness and more specifically, test the player's knowledge on emergency preparedness kits.
After the one minute mark, show them the results and invite them to leave their name and contact information for the chance to win a prize!
In 2008, Emergency Management Ontario partnered with Scouts Canada to develop an Emergency Preparedness (EP) badge program.
Through a variety of activities, Beaver Scouts, Cub Scouts and Scouts will learn about natural disasters, enhance their emergency preparedness knowledge and acquire skills that could help save lives in a community. State and Anne Arundel County emergency officials offer ways to keep safe during the stormy season. Shared by Anne Arundel County Fire Department via FacebookTHE SUMMER SEASON BRINGS POTENTIAL HURRICANE DANGERS TO MARYLANDMAY 24-30 IS MARYLAND HURRICANE PREPAREDNESS WEEKMaryland Hurricane Preparedness Week begins on Sunday, May 24th, and the Anne Arundel County Office of Emergency Management is teaming up with the Maryland Emergency Management Agency (MEMA) and the National Weather Service (NWS) to promote citizen awareness and preparedness. Join us in Valley Forge for a prime opportunity to meet and mingle with key decision makers in the emergency preparedness and prevention field.
While governments at all levels are working hard to keep Canada safe, everyone has a role to play in being prepared for an emergency. With your help, together we can communicate the importance of emergency preparedness to all Canadians.
It is a collaborative event undertaken by provincial and territorial emergency management organizations supporting activities at the local level, in concert with Public Safety Canada and partners. Using the hashtag will make it easy for users to come across your tweets when searching for messages on the topic of Emergency Preparedness Week.
These use less bandwidth than voice communications and may work even when phone service doesn’t. This will make it easier to reach important contacts, such as friends, family, neighbours, child’s school, or insurance agent.
Rail lines and bridge girders twisted, sidewalks buckled, crops wilted and fruit baked on trees.
If someone cannot cope, emergency first responders such as police, fire and ambulance services will provide help. Depending on the situation, federal assistance could include policing, national defence and border security, and environmental and health protection. It can take just a few minutes for the response to move from the local to the national level, ensuring that the right resources and expertise are identified and triggered. Public Safety Canada is responsible for coordinating emergency response efforts on behalf of the federal government.
This special week is a national effort of provincial and territorial emergency management organizations, and Public Safety Canada.


The arrangements for each family member to be at a specific land line telephone at a specific time may not be possible or useful under many conditions, as people may have to relocate or evacuate entirely during a disaster. The Canadian Disaster Database contains references to all types of Canadian disasters, including those triggered by natural hazards, technological hazards or conflict (not including war). While sturdy protective shoes are important during and after a disaster, they are not necessary for survival. Add 3-4 drops of bleach per litre of water with an eyedropper (do not reuse eyedropper for any other purpose). Ten people died and 15,825 others were evacuated when flood waters swept through thousands of homes, businesses, roads and bridges.
Violent storms may deposit enough hail to completely cover the ground, damage crops or block storm sewers.
Add to this quiz by asking questions on potential emergencies that are relevant to your region. With support and advice from our federal-provincial-territorial partners, the Scouts EP program was launched across the country in March 2009. Cub Scouts (ages 8-10) will earn a badge for the program that recognizes broad and increased knowledge on the topic of emergency preparedness. Our conference will bring you face to face with many of those often hard to reach customers. The PDF format will open faster, but the presenter notes will have to be downloaded separately. Suddenly these tools can become vital in helping you and your family deal get in touch and stay informed.
That means everyone has an important role to play, including individuals, communities, governments, the private sector and volunteer organizations. Experience has shown that individual preparedness goes a long way to help people cope better - both during and after a major disaster.
Families should create an emergency plan and carry important information with them so they know how to get in touch and get back together during an emergency. The database describes where and when a disaster occurred, who was affected, and provides a rough estimate of the direct costs. The flood was caused by 36 straight hours of heavy rainfall, for a total accumulation of 290 mm (approximately to the knees). Scouts (ages 11-14) will earn a badge that represents increased knowledge and skills in a specific subject area in emergency preparedness.
Call our Conference Hotline at (610) 494-2240 or register online to reserve your booth today. If your area offers 3-1-1 service or another information system, call that number for non-emergencies.
Finally, both telephone land lines and cellular phones may be overloaded or out of service during or after an emergency, so knowing in advance where to meet is important. EP Week is a national awareness campaign coordinated by Public Safety Canada and is about increasing individual preparedness - by knowing the risks, making a plan and preparing a kit you can be better prepared for an emergency.
Anne Arundel County’s coastlines and low lying areas put it at risk for coastal and inland flooding in addition to the strong winds and heavy rains typically associated with tropical storms. Residents of Anne Arundel County can “be weather ready” by ensuring that they know how to get a warning, have a plan, and practice safety tips.“Safety during any type of severe weather event is imperative,” said Fire Chief Allan Graves. Stay tuned to radio and TV stations for official weather information and be sure to follow instructions and advice given by emergency officials.”Anne Arundel County in conjunction with the City of Annapolis has an Emergency Mass Notification System capable of reaching thousands of residences and business in a matter of minutes. Looking at a map of the county, staff can zoom to the area of interest and draw a polygon selecting the area to be called. The system uses phone numbers from Verizon’s database and matches it to county structure address data. Not every residence or business may be in the system, and thus the Anne Arundel County government encourages all residents and business to register on our Community Notification Enrollment page.“While the last two hurricane seasons have been relatively quiet, we all remember the devastation from Hurricane Sandy in 2012, especially in the New York City area and on Maryland’s lower eastern shore,” said MEMA Executive Director Clay Stamp.
Mobile homes are unsafe in high winds.• Do not attempt to evacuate during the height of a hurricane. You are safer in your home than out on the road• Ensure a supply of water for sanitary purposes such as for cleaning and flushing toilets. Additional information regarding hurricane preparedness can be found on the Anne Arundel County Office of Emergency website and MEMA’s website.



Best emergency food for low blood sugar
Emergency spill containment kits
Report power outage national grid ny contact

Rubric: Business Emergency Preparedness



Comments

  1. can_kan
    Use it numerous instances some fundamental.
  2. GOZEL_2008
    Basis, almost everything I've seen usually agrees that it is certainly (native.
  3. RIHANA
    Such as electric, radio (rf), microwave.
  4. SweeT
    Typically played: packing in much more products (in terms of sheer quantity) that hasn't happened.