Follow these Gloucester, MA fishermen as they use rod and reel to catch the elusive bluefin tuna.
Explore the fascinating facets of your cranium with brainteasers, experiments, and hard science. Explore the lives of otherwise ordinary Americans who are going to great lengths to prepare for the end of the world.
Although he had limited experience in cartography when he joined the expedition in 1803, William Clark emerged as a skilled mapmaker. Sign up for the biweekly Inside National Geographic e-mail newsletter and we’ll let you know when Lewis & Clark hits the big screen. Every week, embark with host Boyd Matson on an exploration of the latest discoveries and interviews with some of the most fascinating people on the planet, on National Geographic Weekend. Please check listings near you to find the best way to listen to National Geographic Weekend, or pick your favorite segments and listen now below!
Jimmy Chin has a knack of capturing some of the most breathtaking images, and it’s only partly because he has access to places that few others are able to go. For as long as humans have watched birds float gracefully on air currents, we have fantasized about leaving the earth behind. Camping can be a tremendously rewarding activity to get away from the city and enjoy nature, but bad equipment can hijack any weekend getaway. Because of their close relations to chimpanzees, but they’re known to be more docile and friendly, young bonobos are popular to keep pets in certain countries. Glaciers around the world are quickly receding as average global temperatures inch higher each year. Many people think of dolphins as active, playful animals who are always jumping and splashing in the waters. National Geographic VoicesResearchers, conservationists, and others around the world share stories and commentary on the National Geographic Society's conversation platform Voices. Society Field Inspection 2016: Gulf of CaliforniaDescribed by Jacques Cousteau as the "aquarium of the world," the Gulf of California in Mexico is threatened by coastal development, climate change, and other human activities.
Support National GeographicWe've supported more than 11,000 grants to scientists and others in the field.Learn more about our work. Two years after being discovered deep in a South African cave, the 1,500 fossils excavated during the Rising Star Expedition have been identified as belonging to a previously unknown early human relative that National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Lee Berger and team have named Homo naledi. With at least 15 individuals of all ages and both sexes represented, the find adds an unprecedented amount of information to our understanding of early human evolution in Africa. In addition, the absence of any other animal remains or large debris in the fossil chamber strongly suggests that these non-human beings intentionally deposited their dead within this cave. BANABA ISLAND, Kiribati—Asbestos dust covers the floors of Banaba’s crumbling colonial houses, buildings, and schools.
Five HOLA youth were invited to participate on a National Geographic shoot at Elysian Park.
HOLA provides underserved youth with exceptional programs in academics, arts and athletics within a nurturing environment, empowering them to develop their potential, pursue their education and strengthen their communities. Clark’s slave York fascinated many Native Americans, who had never seen a black man before.
Shortly after the film Metanoia starts rolling, we learn the defining moment of Jeff Lowe’s life. We got an email today from Boston-based engineering student Julian Tryba about a timelapse video he made of Hawaii.
Celebrating 35 years of inspiration, the 2013 Mountainfilm festival in Telluride, Colorado, will run another exciting program of movies and speakers over Memorial Day weekend. Top prize winners at the 2013 5Point Film Festival set the tone for an exciting spring season of adventure. Pick up the September 2013 edition of National Geographic to read writer Freddie Wilkinson’s feature story about this expedition.
When we think of the Colorado River, we think of its power and its beauty, running from the rugged peaks of the Rocky Mountains and twisting, turning, and splashing through seven western states and two countries. By National Geographic Digital Media's Amy Bucci As the opening credits roll for Feel the Hill, the audience is shown someone sawing a kitchen cutting board apart and gluing the pieces onto everyday gardening gloves. What’s great is that you [US residents] can watch the entire 53-minute film for free over on SnagFilms. When people say you should do "anything" to get the shot, getting decapitated or losing a hand might not be what they had in mind. A group of tourist photographers in the UK found themselves in the middle of a tense, awkward situation this week when they were confronted, detained by, and accused of paedophelia by a group of angry mothers who thought they were photographing children. Here's an amazing short film titled "The Old New World" by photographer and animator Alexey Zakharov of Moscow, Russia.
Everybody is "reinventing" things these days, but even still, we would be lying if we said we weren't at least intrigued by the all-new Impossible Project I-1. Photographer Alexia Sinclair recently completed one of the most beautiful and challenging photo shoots we've ever run across.
I mean, what was he thinking, casually snapping a few pictures as dramatic sunlight broke through the clouds after one of last week’s late spring rainstorms? Brazilian photographer Marcos Alberti's 'Wine Project' portrait series is dead simple: give your subjects some booze and photograph them between drinks. For his new project Lux Noctis, photographer Reuben Wu lit and photographed landscapes at night by mounting powerful LED lights to GPS-enabled drones.
Trying to copy an iconic fashion photograph by the great David Bailey is a daunting task in the best of circumstances.
Huawei is making a lot of noise and some big claims about the dual cameras in their new, Leica co-engineered Huawei P9 smartphone.
Photographer Peter Stewart is an internationally published photographer who's also popular on photo sharing sites, boasting tens of thousands of followers and millions of views on 500px, Flickr, and Instagram. There is a big craze for Sony full frame (FF) mirrorless cameras at the moment, and seeing people rush onto that bandwagon is like watching lemmings following each other over the cliff. When snapping pictures of wild animals in the great outdoors, there are some animals that photographers generally know to be careful around. The 42MP Sony a7R II has got to be one of the most anticipated camera systems in the history of cameras, and for good reason. Over the years, I’ve had the chance to play with all sorts of camera systems, from cheap point-and-shoots to $30,000 80-megapixel behemoths.
Two filmmakers from the International Fund for Animal Welfare race against the clock to capture high-speed footage of a Siberian tiger being released into the wild. Tiger releases had been filmed in the past, but all we could see was a split second of a blurry tiger crossing the screen—hardly imagery that would inspire people to help with tiger conservation.
Brant and I met more than ten years ago during our natural history filmmaking postgrad in New Zealand, but it wasn’t until 2012, when Brant joined our team at IFAW, that we started co-producing again.
I hope folks enjoy seeing Zolushka’s leap back to the wild and realize that Siberian tigers are in deep trouble. We have several new and exciting projects coming up at IFAW involving everything from tigers and elephants in Bhutan to orphan wildlife rehabilitation efforts around the world, so stay tuned and remember to check out our website to find out more. The Short Film Showcase spotlights exceptional short videos created by filmmakers from around the web and selected by National Geographic editors. Skip to minute 8.30 and see the tiger and spare yourself the insufferable, pretentious commentary of these photographers.
I myself being the tiger lover and natural history photographer, I can understand capturing the natural emotions of the tiger release. Wow first let me say thank you for sharing and releasing such a gift back into his natural habitat! Most Amazing Slow motion I have ever seen.But still its so sad to know that it is endangered Species which is going to get extinct because the wild things done by Human Beings (Poaching and killing).
It was breathtaking to watch the release of this magnificent animal, how ever, sad it’s survival status.
In 1977 photographer Rick Smolan was traveling in Australia on assignment for Time magazine when he encountered an angry woman in the small town of Alice Springs.
The woman was Robyn Davidson—the so-called “camel-lady” who undertook a 1,700-mile trek from Alice Springs to the Indian Ocean on foot with four camels and a dog as her companions. When Davidson embarked on her ambitious walk across the Australian Outback she didn’t think it was that big of a deal. Evening temperatures in the desert often dropped below freezing, so a warm fire was a welcome way to end a hard day’s work.


Along her trek, Davidson suffered multiple hardships, including dehydration, sick camels, the poisoning of her beloved dog, and intrusions by curious people who would simply not leave her alone.
She eventually made it to the Indian Ocean where she took her camels for a triumphant swim. After walking almost 1,700 miles across the heart of the Australian Outback, Davidson and her camels arrived at the Indian Ocean. When the story was published, Davidson told Smolan she hated the photos in the magazine, and she was dissatisfied with the editing of the piece.
Rick Smolan’s photo of Robyn Davidson was featured on the cover of the May 1978 issue of National Geographic.
He says he was pleased the filmmakers stayed true to the details of the journey, including the mystery of Davidson’s motivations for her trip, as well as the nuances of their relationship.
He says her scorn eventually led him to stop taking assignments and start producing his own photo books, including the wildly successful “Day in the Life” series, which have sold millions of copies worldwide. He adds that part of the modern day appeal of Davidson’s tale is that it would be almost impossible to do again today. Watch Rick Smolan talk live at National Geographic about his experiences in Australia with Robyn Davidson.
Also, hear more from Smolan and Davidson in this video interview from MediaStorm and purchase Inside TRACKS here.
Smolan is co-creator of the best-selling “A Day in the Life” series, which has sold more than three-million copies worldwide.
I love both the beautiful film TRACKS and the National Geographic feature on Robyn Davidson.
After suffering losses of loved ones, I too am ready to undertake my own trek to the ocean.
I must agree with some previous comments about the film, the girl looks selfish and she has problem with herself.
I had read and was so captured by the story and fotos in NG in 1978 and still have the article. Read your book years ago in Italy where I now live and loved it and have recently watched the film which made me cry. I can personally relate to her preference for the company of animals to people and the desire to get lost in nature; get away from city noise and the trappings of modern day life.
Drove a Meyers Manx from Port Hedland, Wilnuna, Carnegie Station, Warburton, Broken Hill and Toowoomba to Brisbane.in 1972. THE STORY IS ONE OF A DREAM AND A QUEST AND A YOUNG LADY WHO STRETCHES LIFE TO THE FULLEST , FIGHTING PHYSICAL AS WELL AS SPIRITUAL ISSUES–WE ALL CAN LEARN FROM HER JOURNEY.
I loved this movie and Maybe without and maybe without Ricks Smolan’s help Robyn Davidson would not be able to make the journey.
I’m concerned that the movie romanticized the event, although I have not read the book.
A fantastic story, What a strong woman you are Robyn Davidson, such an inspiration for all women especially Australians.
2 hours of pure enjoyment, this movie is a must see, the beauty of the landscape, the agony of being alone, the friendship of the natives and endurance of the camels and man’s best friend, is truly amazing.
So many times when watching movies I feel as though it”s putting holes in my brain,this movie fills the holes. I was first apprehensive to see the movie because I was afraid it would not live up to what I had read before. So many people do journeys in their life to get in touch with who they are and take time out of their day to day world to do it. But thank goodness there are those who do the journey who invite us with them in their re telling of their story. I am a lucky man – I still have not seen the movie but am ecstatically looking forward to it after recently having red the book, which totally blowed me away.
Initially I was reluctant to watch this movie thinking it would be this slow boring thing, but as I have travelled the outback I was more interested in seeing the scenery across the country that part of the outback I hadn’t been however from the moment the movies started and in particular once the trek commenced I became riveted.
From Alice to Ocean va ser el meu primer CD-Rom i em va canviar la manera com veia els ordinadors. What an amazing story the movie was grwat and thank you Robin for sharing your journey with the world.
Amazing book and amazing film.Thoroughly enjoyed both and a fantastic image of the beautiful outback of Australia. Your article opened an entire new world to me, one which I never dreamed existed and one which I could never enter. The compass readings he took at each twist and turn contributed to the first map of what would become the U.S. Equal parts ski-mountaineer and photographer, Jimmy tells Boyd that it’s occasionally difficult to compartmentalize skiing down Everest while looking for a perfect shot, but his years of climbing experience has him comfortable while in precarious positions on the mountain. Most people are content to enjoy flight with a drink and some peanuts, but Yves Rossy wanted the wind in his face. Boyd checks in with gear guru Steve Casimiro to learn about the latest technology in silent-opening tents, portable espresso-makers, and a solar-heated shower. Although they started as wolves, Carl Zimmer tells Boyd that the less aggressive members of the canine family crept closer to man and learned to wait his turn for table scraps. But National Geographic grantee Justine Jackson Ricketts says that the rare Irrawaddy dolphins tend to be quieter and stay in the water.
Posters and commenters are required to observe National Geographic's community rules and other terms of service. To learn firsthand what's going on in and around this marine treasure of global importance, the National Geographic Society sent its top scientists and officials to the region in January 2016.
Nine days into a solo first ascent of the North Face of the Eiger in Switzerland in 1991, Lowe was huddled in a grotto far from the summit, soaking wet, shivering, and hungry. We were swept away by his gorgeous images of Maui and Oahu, a wonderful antidote to the wintertime blues.
The impressive lineup includes leading adventure athletes, environmental activists, and documentary filmmakers. Beginning with the Moving Mountains Symposium on Friday, the festival revolves around the theme of climate solutions.
The long journey of solo explorer Kyle Dempster in the movie The Road From Karakol took the Best of the Fest award. Missouri-based artist-climber-filmmaker Jeremy Collins is expressive, artistic, and intuitive—and his new film The Equation is all of those things. We later learn these special gloves are essential gear for a unique extreme sport called longboarding. But that's what one tourist almost did while trying to get a photo of a plane landing at the dangerous St. Appropriately enough, the Leica M design has been with us for over 60 years and has documented revolutions in both times of peace and war throughout history as the idea of a simple, easy to carry camera enabling it to be carried anywhere. Collins noticed something curious about the reissues: the Phil Collins on the new album covers looks quite a bit older. The resulting collection, A Frozen Tale, is both a magical visual journey and a testament to the iron will and determination of one of the world's premier fine art photographers.
From the front seat of his car in a suburban Boston Trader Joe’s parking lot, of all places? On paper, the 80D looks to be an improvement in practically every regard over the 70D of 2013, especially with the introduction of a new dual-pixel 45 point auto-focus.
But how much more daunting would it be if you were doing this shoot with Bailey standing behind you, looking over your shoulder and making sure you do his work justice? But will the phone live up to the hype out in the real world, in real photographers' hands? I've met up with a lot of different types of people, pro and amateurs, veterans and newbies, and guess what? A man over in Belarus was killed recently after getting too close to a beaver he was trying to photograph. I’ve observed as the DSLR video revolution spread across the world, and watched as the lines between photography and videography started to blur as video cameras started to shoot stills and still cameras started to shoot video. In the past, conventional cameras captured only a fleeting glimpse of a tiger as it left its enclosure to return to the wild. Their numbers are now down to around 350-450 in the wild, so groups like the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) have been working with partner groups in the Russian Far East to tackle the illegal wildlife trade and rehabilitate orphaned tigers for release back into the wild. When we heard that another tiger (Zolushka) was going to be released, our goal was to capture the moment like no one had ever done in the past by using a special ultra-slow-motion camera.


If we aren’t able to save the largest and most charismatic cat of all, what hope do we have for any other species? We spent days planning and rehearsing how we would film the release, but you can’t anticipate the millions of things that can go wrong during the capture, transport, and release stages.
Her tracking collar and dozens of camera traps positioned in her forest habitat are showing us that she has established a territory of her own and has been successful in hunting and living a perfectly normal life. It’s really a once-in-a-lifetime film because we’re able to draw on 45 years of footage that IFAW has gathered. We look for work that affirms National Geographic’s mission of inspiring people to care about the planet. Donde, el 80% trata de uno o mas tipos que no cuentan como hacen las cosas, 15% de las cosas de estos tipos (sus camaras, equipos de computo, equipo de traslado, y hasta sus botas, etc) y el 5% del animal en cuestion.
Yet it makes me sad at the same time, the knowledge that there are so few tigers left in the world. Nice thing You let the tiger back in the wild life but the video its one of worst I have ever watch! My resources are limited to help, but I can forward your documentation, in hopes that those with the means will help.
The slow motion shot of her coming out of the crate clearly defined the expression of happiness she felt to be free. The problem was, although Davidson had been training her camels and preparing for the trip for years, Smolan had no experience in the outback. While she initially resisted his presence, eventually they became friends, then started a brief romance. After making camp, Robyn Davidson would cook dinner and then listen to teaching tapes that taught her to speak Pitjantjara, the local aboriginal dialect. At one point, when Smolan heard a rumor that she was lost in the desert, he high-tailed it from Asia to Australia to track her down, unwittingly leading a mob of other frenzied journalists along with him.
It was the end of her physical journey, but the beginning of her sharing her story with the world—first in the 1978 National Geographic article, and later in her best-selling memoir called TRACKS.
Smolan is married with two children, and has published a series of photo books with his wife, Jennifer Erwitt. I feel bad for her dog Diggity and wonder why did she even take her to a dangerous journey. It is a beautiful story about a courageous, young woman who chose to follow her dream in spite of the odds against her. Miss Davidson, you were a courageous young women, I hope you are well, thanks for sharing a piece of your life. I wished she would have left her dog Diggy behind with friends, or family.lucky for Rick to stay with her during her trip. I’m concerned that young women who watch it will think they should be able to do same without proper covering for body and feet.
My late mother loved stories from Australia and likely had the issue of National Geographic in which this story was published. I am very glad that I watched the movie and the accompanying additional interviews on the DVD. I particularly liked that they showed certain things ie snake on neck but didn’t overemphasize it. I have always been in awe of Robyn and what she achieved, the movie was great I have seen it twice and I agree with Robyn’s comments elsewhere Mia did a great job. What Robin did showed a lot of courage and fortitude to continue, amazing outback scenery stuff I hadn’t seen before the isolation that Robin endured was breathtaking ! De fet, aquest CD-Rom venia gratuitament en els Macintosh que estrenaven tambe els lector de CD-Roms.
Kennedy, Will Rothhaar as Lee Harvey Oswald, Michelle Trachtenberg as Marina Oswald, and Ginnifer Goodwin as Jackie Kennedy, the premiere will coincide with the 50th anniversary of America’s 35th president. The Jetman took four engines, strapped them to a wing and now soars like a jet-powered bird, flying across the English Channel in 10 minutes. Claudine Andre, founder of Lola ya Bonobo, tells the story of introducing one bonobo to his jungle home in her film, Beny Back To The Wild. The photographer and filmmaker left extremely durable cameras on glaciers in Greenland, Montana, Arctic Canada, Europe and Bolivia to capture time lapse footage of glaciers steadily retreating over several years.
They toured the desert islands off the southeastern coast of the Baja Peninsula and they listened to presentations by more than a dozen experts, including several whose Baja California research is funded by the Society. The big-mountain feats he pulls off are nothing short of incredible as he mixes skills from different sports.
Fuji, gawking at the frescoes in the Vatican, or relishing spicy cuisine in Thailand, most people think of the destination for what it has to offer, from culture to scenery to sensational experiences.
But the IFAW hopes high-speed, high-definition videos of these events will inspire people to help with tiger conservation.
More importantly, you can never tell a wild Siberian tiger what to do, so we were all at her mercy.
It has now been just over a year and our ultimate hope is that she will be able to breed with the resident male tiger and have cubs of her own soon.
Most people are surprised to hear that this hunt still takes place, and the film really opens up a window into this issue. The filmmakers created the content presented, and the opinions expressed are their own, not those of the National Geographic Society.
But she also needed money, so Smolan helped introduce her to editors at National Geographic who offered funding in exchange for her story. Smolan didn’t tell his editors about the affair—the relationship would have been frowned upon. He reflects that traveling with Davidson—and having to make tough choices about covering and becoming involved in her story—ultimately changed his career. He is CEO of Against All Odds Productions, and lives in New York with his wife and collaborator Jennifer Erwitt. Anyway the film reminds me of how we human love to hold on to things that hurt us, dramatizing them, how we’re addicted to suffering. I see one or two posters just don’t get it, they have probably lived sheltered lives in big cities and have never seen the Outback or Camels for that matter. Ell treball d’en Rick Smolan va estimular la meva carrera ja que em va obrir els ulls i em va mostrar un nou mont, el molt multimedia. His award-winning film, Chasing Ice, has provided beautiful and chilling footage of our world’s increasing heat. There was something really powerful about how she ran into the forest, paused and looked back at us, let out an unbelievable roar, and took off. Capturing and showing the ultra slow motion of the tiger release signifies the use of phantom cameras. But as he continued to document Davidson’s journey he became an inextricable part of her story. Across the years I had forgotten Robyn’s story, but it all came back to me as my wife and I watched Tracks last night. I admire your perseverance and probably some of your reasoning was fueled by a need to detach. Stunning visual panoramas leave me in awe of this young woman who showed such courage, such resilience, such gritty determination.
My heart broke for the little girl who lost her Mum family and best friend Goldie in one hit.
I also felt her dislike of some of the Australians and their racist attitudes toward the Aborigines.
His focus is to help keep them off the streets and out of gangs by educating them about the great outdoors.
You can almost smell the campfires, imagine the silence, and conjure both the difficulty and the romance of the trek. To me it’s more a story of the people who found her and helped her, but they are not the star of the film. I was shattered and my face hurt from crying when you had to say goodbye to your loyal dog Digity.



Zombie situation free games
Survival skill book new vegas 9mm
Survival seeds from doomsday preppers

Rubric: Business Emergency Preparedness



Comments

  1. killer_girl
    A rule of thumb is that the hole diameter must be much.
  2. KoLDooN
    Bag can be a nice luxury gets a bit more.
  3. SADE_QIZ
    Pose a threat to patients with irregular heartbeats end up being don't know what type.