The Pali word for mindfulness is Sati, which actually means activity and is also translated as awareness. While reading many explanations of mindfulness, I came to realize that a better understanding of mindfulness requires a tremendous amount of reading and comprehension. So where does that leave the average person, like you and I, in terms of gaining a better understanding?
Anapana Sati, the meditation on in-and-out breathing, is the first subject of meditation expounded by the Buddha. I think this is highly relevant that it was Buddha’s first teaching on meditation, because all things begin and end with the breath.
And while I do think that complete comprehension of mindfulness goes far beyond mere words, I feel confident that the breath can lead us to that deeper understanding.
If we can train our minds to be constantly aware of this breath, we become more and more mindful of thoughts and feelings (physical and emotional) that arise and fall away. We all know that we are constantly breathing, now all we have to do is pay attention to this. Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.
One of the tenets of the Buddhist idea of mindfulness is the following: an attentive awareness of the present moment.
I would like to use this image in a ppt presentation on mindfulness in a nonprofit educational setting. Love the mindfulness graphic and used it to for a free educational wellness program at the local library, crediting you!
I have used your photo in my blog where i’m talking about mindfulness because I love it so much. I’ve been practicing yoga and meditation for some time now, and finally wanted to write a post on the benefits of practicing mindfulness.
Great Graphic Doug; Appreciate the generosity you show in allowing your image to be shared. Hi Doug, I’m doing a leaflet for a university project on mindfulness and would like to know if it is ok to use your image? I am putting together a 2 page educational handout regarding Mindfullness and Health for wellness coaching.
I’m facilitating Mindfulness Meditation workshops at the University of Maryland Counseling Center. I came across one of your images (the mindfulness one: past-present-future) on the wall of my yoga class room (in Rotorua, New Zealand).
I would like permission to use your images in handouts for clients and to share the handouts with other colleagues. Hi Doug, I used your Mindfulness image on my therapies website a couple of years ago, I’ve now got a different website and have done a similar post on it. Would it be possible to use this image within promotional material for some mindfulness sessions? Hi Doug, may wish to use this image as part of an in-house presentation on one of our Health & Wellbeing days as part of a Health & Safety week promotion if that is ok? Hi Doug, I am a mindfulness teacher in Australia and I am putting together a mindfulness workbook. Also, I’m hoping to do a series of free talks at other libraries and community centers over the next year – would it be OK to keep using your image for these other events, without asking permission each time? Would you mind I use your picture on my Facebook to sharing “Mindfulness” to people in Taiwan? Mindfulness is a modern concept, which describes the adoption of a new mindset, which can measurably alter ones outlook and mood and is used as an empowering tool in the self management of anxiety and stress. Mindfulness is the practice of being aware in every possible moment, while keeping a non-judgmental outlook and at the same time observing your own bodily and emotional responses. To do this you should begin to observe the ‘self’ and any reactions to situations and others in a dispassionate way.  In other words, not be a slave to our own thoughts and the emotions that they generate, but to step back and assess before the usual reaction takes place. This powerful course will teach you everything that you need to know about Mindfulness and how to start using the techniques and principles in your daily life.
The Mindfulness Diploma Course will take you up to 150 hours to complete working from home. Mindfulness is a form of mental training that has been widely practised for millennia; however, it’s only recently that science and clinical practice have discovered the profound potential of mindfulness-based practices for increasing our wellbeing.
Waited for the weather report and when the forecast is given not even hear what the weatherperson says? Find yourself in a conversation with somebody and then suddenly wake up to the fact that you are not taking in a word of what they are saying?
Find yourself reading a book and realising halfway through the chapter that you haven’t taken in a word? If you answered yes to any of these questions, then you know something about what it means to be unmindful!
In a state of full awareness we connect more with our children, work more efficiently, drive more safely and stress less.
Mindfulness for Life is written by two experts in the field who bring the medical perspective of an international authority on mindfulness and the psychological perspective of a researcher. Mindfulness is a matter of being fully present in the moment. As we plan goals for the upcoming year, I invite you to join me in considering the benefits of mindfulness and whether being more intentionally mindful is a resolution that you may find has value.
Consider our attention as being like a scarce resource, one that we completely consume every second. The practice of mindfulness makes us intentional and purposeful about where we are to focus our attention. Mindfulness is making purposeful investment in whatever is happening right now, as right now is the only thing that is real and that we can control. Mindfulness removes the distractions of thoughts not directly related to the present moment, freeing up our attention.
When we judge, we focus on ourselves which can lead to increased self-consciousness, anxiety and stress. To be mindful is to once again become aware of what has been forgotten, taken for granted, and assumed, and appreciated simply for what it is. Having a beginner’s mind: a reluctance to operate in ‘‘automatic pilot mode,’’ despite previous knowledge or expertise with related experiences.
Being non-judgmental of self and others: judgmental thoughts may be a distraction from the present experience.
Non-striving: representing a shift of focus from attaining goals and meeting expectations to what is happening in the present so that the experience of the present is not undermined by the goals of the future. Acceptance: a willingness to see one’s situation as it truly is rather than focusing on how one wishes it to be.


Letting go: allowing thoughts, feelings and experiences to come and go, without allowing them to distract one’s attention. Describe: Being able to describe or label in words our beliefs, opinions, emotions, expectations.
Non-reactivity: Being able to perceive our emotions without reacting to them, without becoming dysregulated.
As the breath passes in and out of the body, bring your awareness to the changing sensations at your abdomen. Trying to force thoughts and feelings out of our mind just feeds them with what they feed on – attention – which makes them stronger, and increases their impact. There are other approaches to meditation, such as performing a body scan focusing on each area of your body, meditating on a topic, meditating on an object or spiritual figure or their teachings, or meditating on a future state you desire.
There are tomes written on meditation and the related topic of prayer, but the general consensus is that it does not take much to get results. A key is to be patient, as there can be a tendency to judge yourself and feel like you are doing it wrong.
I am reminded of the original Karate Kid, where the young untrained hero was commissioned to “wax on, wax off”. I do not profess to be an expert and at times feel very much like Ralph Macchio just going through the motions.
My day job role is as a Community Manager for an innovation hub, developing capacity, capability and resiliency in individuals and local communities through entrepreneurship. I believe in helping people realise their full potential within the organisations and communities in which they serve. I studied Mindfulness with John Julian in Melbourne, Victoria which deepened my understanding of everyday mindfulness.
Mindfulness is the energy that helps us recognize the conditions of happiness that are already present in our lives. By James Guay on April 22, 2014 in Addictions, Authenticity, Couples Communication, Psychotherapy, Self-Care.
In this video, I’ll talk about what mindfulness really IS and more importantly HOW it can help you enjoy your life more.
We can understand ourselves and our relationships more deeply….being less reactive and more empathic.
Mindfulness has also been popularized in the West by Jon Kabat-Zinn, the US medical doctor who created the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction program at the University of Massachusetts. Intentionally increasing our awareness of our experience let’s us see all of the options available to us we might not have seen before. Judgements keep us unconscious because it becomes unsafe to look more deeply whereas curiosity allows us to see things and connect the dots. It opens us up in a safe way to see what’s really there and to work with that from a place of curiosity and ALSO with COMPASSION. If we notice that we have limiting beliefs, like believing we’re unloveable, or have to prove our worth, or have to put on a fake self in order to be accepted, we begin to notice how these things can create patterns of distant and destructive relationships, addictions, stress and further removes us from our truest and most authentic self. Whether it’s mindful eating, mindful washing dishes, mindful walking, mindful brushing our teeth, mindful showering, mindful waiting in traffic or in line…slowing down, doing one thing at a time, and noticing all the nuances of movement, using all of our senses to really feel what it is that we’re doing instead of multi-tasking and losing the experience of the present moment. I encourage you to take a task today to practice mindfulness based on the above principles. Even some of the most scholarly Monks that have written essays on this subject often say that much of the understanding is beyond words.
If you have no breath, then there is no thought, no feeling, no sensation, no desire, no clinging, no attachment.
And if you think of it, send me a image of your poster, I am curious to see how it fits in with your research. I’d like to use it in a power point for a workshop at Widener University on mindfulness-based body awareness for social workers and sex therapists. They have a feeling of movement to them which is juxta posed with the idea of stillness in mindfulness meditation!
Yes, feel free to use any of these images in your blog post (a link back here to this page would be much appreciated!). Secondly, feel free to share these images with those you work with – to be honest, I could use more reminders of mindfulness myself. Yes, feel free to keep using it ?? Glad to hear you’ve checked out Verbal To Visual as well – you should give sketchnoting a try! I’m giving a free talk at my local library on mindfulness, and the librarian and I would like to use your image on a flyer, their Facebook page, and their online event calendar. Many businesses and individuals are introducing powerful Mindfulness techniques into their daily routines to help relieve stress in the work place and to keep a positive outlook and to help adopt a more productive approach in life. Whether you are looking to use the Mindfulness techniques to help yourself or others, upon completion of this course you can work as a Mindfulness Practitioner either on a 1-2-1 basis or with groups of people, either in a therapy practice or in the workplace. By adopting a mindful perspective, we observe our experience but don’t get caught up in it.
By slowing down and investigating our thoughts, feelings and experiences more carefully, we create space and time to come up with wise responses to the difficulties in our lives.
We are less wrapped up in our own thoughts and feelings and so have greater ability to take others into account.
We experience the world in an open way that is not so weighed down by unhelpful psychological patterns and cultivates gratitude. Through Mindfulness, we see that events, thoughts and feelings always change, and we can learn to bear experiences more lightly, and let them go.
There is no time limit for completing this course, it can be studied in your own time at your own pace.
Mindfulness can even help you reduce your risk of disease, overcome addiction, manage your weight, unhook yourself from depression or simply enjoy a good night’s sleep.
Being unmindful means wasting our lifetime, missing important information, increasing our risk of physical and social accidents and communicating more superficially with other people.
It shows you how to apply mindfulness techniques to your own life whether you need help with medical conditions, personal development or spiritual development.
The result is a book that translates the scientific principles behind mindfulness into a simple, practical and accessible manual to applying mindfulness – for life. Imagine that we spend our attention like we spend a pay check, budgeting different amounts to where it satisfies our needs or wants. Other parts of our attention we spend on the future that is yet to happen or may not happen, playing out scenarios in plans and daydreams. Like living pay check to pay check, we can go through life never quite having enough attention to give. We can tell ourselves that we need to pay more attention, but without removing the other expenditures it is like saying we need to spend more money on food when we are already overdrawn and over-budget.


References to mindfulness can be found in many religions and philosophies going back over 2,500 years. This is where you buy something small with a large bill and then lose track of where the change goes.
We can start out fresh with a full account, but as we pay out small amounts to worries and distractions, we can end up with nothing remaining. Being in the present means you are not dwelling on the past and you are not lost in the future. Judgement turns comments into criticism and allows compliments to stop us from seeing ourselves accurately. We take things as they are, no more and no less, as accurately and realistically as possible. Mindfulness has moved from a spiritual and philosophical topic and been embraced by the psychological and therapeutical communities. When you refer to mindfulness, you can use it as a practice (such as doing meditation or other mindful acts), as a state of being (describing someone as mindful), and as a trait we exhibit (as in we do things in a mindful way).
You can self-assess your own state of mindfulness by testing yourself on these traits using this link to the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire. The point of focus can be where the air enters and leaves thee nose, or where the stomach rises and falls with each breath. One technique for practice is what they refer to as the raisin meditation, where you eat a raisin as if for the first time, focusing and observing without judgement all your senses on the experience.
The context of the meditation varies based on the religion or purpose, but the general principle is disciplining your mind to focus on one thing. In his practical How to practice: The way to a meaningful life, the Dalai Lama proposes it can take around six months to achieve concentrated meditation. Over time, you learn to address the two conditions the Dalai Lama refers to as excitement and laxity. He grew frustrated of doing the same motions over and over to what he felt was a pointless exercise. I am encouraged, however, by the benefits shown by research and the simplicity of what is required.
You only have a finite amount and I appreciate that you have given some of it to reading this post.
I believe that can only be done by challenging convention and taking a perspective that is sideways to the norm. Be aware of your thoughts, be aware of your feelings, be aware of any physical sensations, be aware of the sounds and smell around you.
The cartoon above is a gentle reminder to keep your mind aligned with your body in the only time we ever actually have – the present. I appreciate how you share your story, in particular the multiple exposures to mindfulness in different contexts before it really caught on.
I produce a flier to advertise these free workshops, and I think the images capture the essence of how I explain mindfulness to the participants very well. This course is fully certified via the IANLPC, upon completion of the course assessment you will receive your Mindfulness Diploma Certificates from the IANLPC and Centre of Excellence.
Mindfulness helps us get greater clarity on what is happening in our minds, and in our lives. We create space between the urge to react and our actions themselves, and we can make considered and creative decisions about how to behave.
We can be more considerate, empathic, compassionate, sensitive and flexible in our relationships. We are better attuned to ourselves, to others, and to the world, and able to act more skilfully, based on present need, rather than past conditioning. We are more able to enjoy well-being that does not depend on things going “right” or always being right. Importantly, it makes us unhappier than we realise and vulnerable to stress and poor mental health. Still other parts of our attention we scatter across distractions in the spirit of “multi-tasking”, checking smart phones, working through situations not related to the current situation, presuming what other people are thinking, or simply being “somewhere else”. This can lead to a feeling of mindlessly moving from moment to moment, overwhelmed and absent-minded, paying out nickels and dimes to situations that really need our full investment. Mindfulness has made its way into contemporary culture in the 1960s in large part through Thich Nhat Hanh, a Vietnamese Zen Buddhist monk and Nobel Peace Prize nominee.
You break a $20 on a $3.00 candy bar, leaving you with smaller notes and change that looks like you have more than you really have. We judge our own thoughts as they come into our head, and we guess at the thoughts of others in our internal narratives that run parallel to whatever physical conversation we are having. There is something special about watching a child experience something for the first time, as we live vicariously through their wonder and amazement. They will settle themselves all the more quickly if we learn not to get involved with them. Just like other physical exercise, he recommends short and frequent sessions, around five minutes at a time, at intervals of four to sixteen times per day. He did not know he was learning unconscious skills and building muscles and reactions to help him in the fight. If you have more attention to spare, I welcome your thoughts on all things mindfulness and meditation below. This course will take you up to 150 hours to complete from home, there is no time limit for completing the course it can be studied in you own time at your own pace.
By focusing on what is rather than be distracted by what isn’t mindfulness can make us much calmer, happier and healthier beings.
One of the participants in Thich Nhat Hanh’s courses was American doctor Jon Kabat-Zinn, who then went on to package the concept of mindfulness into an eight-week course called Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction, which helped further spread the approach.
Compared to other skills you can learn in six months, mindfulness appears to have substantial benefits across a range of areas in life. If you feel others could benefit from being a bit more mindful, please consider sharing through the social channel of your choice using the buttons below.
Similarly, meditating trains the mind how to gain the benefits of being mindful when out in the real world. The example he gives is of tuning your mind like a guitar, not too tight and not too loose.
But when you breathe in, and you are aware of your in-breath, you touch the miracle of being alive.




Secret numbers in the mona lisa
Jesus meditation prayer examples
A secret affair lifetime movie review
How to change my name on gmail on android


 

  1. 26.08.2014 at 23:26:28
    Ameno writes:
    Via her service to yogis in the Meditation Middle and her $200?processing charge, with.
  2. 26.08.2014 at 19:33:33
    arkadas writes:
    Also you just cleared for me - the exercises are almost like offers you somewhat.