For more than 50 years, the 13-story white limestone building at 370 Jay Street housed the headquarters of New York’s evolving transit agencies: first the Board of Transportation, then the Transit Authority, and finally New York City Transit.
The New York Transit Museum’s exhibition "The Secret Life of 370 Jay Street" examines the building’s form and function as well as its exciting future.
The Secret Life of 370 Jay Street reveals the inner workings and quirky history of one of New York’s first mid-century modern office buildings. The New York Transit Museum’s upcoming exhibition The Secret Life of 370 Jay Street examines the building’s form and function as well as its exciting future. The Secret Life of 370 Jay Street will reveal the inner workings and the quirky history of one of New York’s first mid-century modern office buildings. While the show touches on topics such as architecture, urban planning, new technologies, and sustainability, the star of the show is the building itself. New York Transit Museum Curator Brigid Harmon will lead a public tour of the exhibition at 2 pm on Friday, November 13. The New York Transit Museum, one of the city’s leading cultural institutions, is the largest museum in the United States devoted to urban public transportation history and one of the premier institutions of its kind in the world.
The Texas State Railroad is preparing for its 18th annual Salute to the Armed Forces event on May 28-29, 2016.
The Old Dominion Modelers group at the Richmond Railroad Museum is going to have a White Elephant Sale! While the large, limestone, window-lined facade of Brooklyn’s 370 Jay Street looks like your typical office building, it actually played a large role in architectural history and currently functions as an operations headquarters for the New York City transit system.
For 50 years, organizations like the Transit Authority, New York City Transit, and Board of Transportation have used the building as an office.
Starting October 28 and lasting until May 2016, the exhibit will showcase the building’s history, how it currently functions, and its future through photos, architectural sketches, and maps. 370 Jay Street was built in 1951 as part of the post-World War II Brooklyn Civic Center Urban Renewal project. In 2012, New York University and the city of New York agreed to renovate the building into a sustainable hub for NYU’s growing engineering programs. 370 Jay Street has changed over the years, so be sure to experience the exhibit soon as the building once again enters a new phase in its life. The New York Transit Museum’s upcoming exhibition “The Secret Life of 370 Jay Street,” which opens to the public on Wednesday, Oct. The data processing rooms were crammed with desks and largely staffed with female employees who processed documents that prompted and recorded the operations of the subway system. New York Transit Museum Curator Brigid Harmon will lead a public tour of the exhibition at 2 pm on Friday, Nov.
A Money Room employee uses the GPS 1000 high speed mixed currency counter and sorter to process 30 bills per second. The article focused on a local man who exiled himself to a closet and was being forced out by police. BROOKLYN BOROUGH President Eric Adams is hosting “Bright, Beautiful, Brooklyn Smiles!” today from 10 a.m. The New York Transit Museum, one of the city's leading cultural institutions, is the largest museum in the United States devoted to urban public transportation history, and one of the premier institutions of its kind in the world. The New York Transit Museum's galleries feature popular exhibits such as Steel, Stone, and Backbone, which recounts the tale of building New York City's 100 year-old subway system, and many highly interactive exhibitions such as On The Streets, an in-depth look at New York City's trolleys and buses. The New York Transit Museum operates a gallery annex in Grand Central Terminal that presents changing exhibitions.
The New York Transit Museuma€™s Lunch Room is available to visitors during the Museuma€™s public hours.
Our Lunch Room has a limited capacity and we hope to make it accessible to as many visitors as possible. Bus: B25, B26, B38, B41, B45, B52, B54, B57, B61, B62, B63, B65, B67, B103 all stop within 1 to 2 blocks of the museum. On Tuesdays through Fridays, our guided school programs provide students from Pre-K to grade 12 the opportunity for hands-on learning. Please visit the Teacher Resource Center, which provides detailed information about the programs we offer and step-by-step instructions for planning and reserving a class trip to the Museum.
Guided by expert staff, experience a hands-on collection of antique subway and elevated cars and detailed exhibits that tell this rich story. Every Saturday and Sunday at 1:30, programs for our youngest transit fans are offered free with Museum admission. The New York Transit Museum Gallery Annex & Store at Grand Central Terminal, and the Transit Museum in downtown Brooklyn are wheelchair accessible. The New York Transit Museum's wheelchair accessible entrance is located on the corner of Schermerhorn and Court Streets, in Downtown Brooklyn.
The New York Transit Museum Gallery Annex & Store in Grand Central Terminal is located in the Shuttle Passage on the Main Concourse level. The New York Transit Museum offers Sign Language Interpreters for all of our programs upon request. FM assisted-listening devices (headset and neck loops) are available for all offsite excursions and tours within the Museum upon request. To learn more about programs offered for visitors with disabilities, please visit our Calendar of Events or contact the Special Education and Access Coordinator, Meredith Gregory at 718-694-1823 or email. To make a reservation, please visit our Calendar of Events or for additional information please call (718) 694-1867. By order of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority and its operating agencies, for security reasons, photography is not permitted inside decommissioned facilities.
Museum memberships lasts for one year from the month of purchase, and are available in a variety of levels. One benefit of membership is access to our members-only tours of the Old City Hall subway station and other historic sites.
Please note that members may purchase as many members-only tour tickets as there are people covered by their membership. Please note that reciprocal benefits are at the discretion of the offering institution and subject to change without notice. As the largest museum of public transportation history in the United States, and one of the premier institutions of its kind in the world, the New York Transit Museum is one of New York City's most unique venues for private and corporate events. The New York Transit Museum is housed in a 1936 decommissioned, but still operational, subway station - the perfect setting for a museum dedicated to mass transit, and a truly New York special event.


Various spaces throughout the museum are available for events, including the platform level where guests may board over 20 vintage and elevated cars. The New York Transit Museum is also available to the media community for film, video, and photo shoots. All parties are followed by a 15 minute clean up period, after which guests are escorted from the party area. Design A Vehicle: your guests will craft plain boxes into fun, colorful buses and trains, with wheels that really roll! Miles of Tiles: your guests will create their own mosaics, inspired by art on subway platforms and by their own imaginations! Scavenger Hunt: your guests will explore the vintage trains on our platform, seeking out designs and details from past eras! All parties are followed by a 15-minute clean up period, after which guests are escorted from the party area. The Transit Museum offers a wide range of education programs for school and camp groups, including guided tours and activities for special needs classes. Every Saturday and Sunday, families can join us for weekend family programs that are free with paid Museum admission. The Transit Museum's 10-week after school program for children on the Autism Spectrum is offered in the fall and spring. The New York Transit Museum is dedicated to the collection and preservation of materials relating to the region's land based public transportation systems, past and present. In the art gallery on the mezzanine, the museum presents changing exhibitions of contemporary art works as well as historical subjects. An exhibit on Fare Collection shows representative examples of various types of collection devices used throughout the subway system's history.
A gallery dedicated to surface transportation presents, in nine complementing segments, a history of above ground mobility for the last 175 years – from the early 1800s through the 21st Century. Clearing the Air a highly interactive segment of On the Streets allows visitors to learn about the evolution of fuel technologies and evaluate their environmental impact. Friends of the New York Transit Museum, a 501c3 nonprofit organization, would like to thank the following supporters of our 2015 Gala. As the home for staff and operations of those agencies, its 420 perfectly uniform windows hid a secret elevator used to move cash from fare collection trains to the Money Room on the second floor, the famed Subway Command Center, sleek sunlit offices for employees from the chairman to the mail clerks – even a Lost and Found Department full of abandoned umbrellas. Built as part of the Brooklyn Civic Center Urban Renewal project following World War II, 370 Jay Street is now again at the center of change. Photographs, architectural drawings, maps, models and ornamental details removed from the building will highlight the aesthetic form and diverse functions of the building as it transitions into its new life. Designed by famous subway architect Squire Vickers, an early 1935 watercolor rending and an original model of the building – complete with miniature trolley cars – help tell the story of the design and ornamentation of 370 Jay Street and its storied place in New York City transportation history. New York Transit Museum exhibits and programs are supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, and by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.
The Museum explores the development of the greater New York metropolitan region through the presentation of exhibitions, tours, educational programs and workshops dealing with the cultural, social and technological history of public transportation.
The New York Transit Museum’s new exhibit, The Secret Life of 370 Jay Street, will soon reveal the building’s significance to the public. This has somewhat limited people’s knowledge of its significance, as the building once had cool aspects such as a secret second floor elevator used to transport money, the Subway Command Center, and a Lost and Found Department containing abandoned umbrellas. Since it helped set the architectural standards of the modern office building, the exhibit will touch on the physical aspects of the building and explore concepts like sustainability and urban planning. Renovation commenced last winter and will be complete in summer 2017 as part of the university’s goal to “transform the long-empty 370 Jay Street building into a global center for science, technology, and education—and a driving force in Brooklyn’s economic revolution.”  Thus, a grant from NYU helped bring this exhibit to come to life.
Designed by famous subway architect Squire Vickers, an early 1935 watercolor rending and an original model of the building — complete with miniature trolley cars — help tell the story of the design and ornamentation of 370 Jay Street and its storied place in New York City transportation history.
The Museum explores the development of the greater New York metropolitan region through the presentation of exhibitions, tours, educational programs, and workshops dealing with the cultural, social, and technological history of public transportation. The gallery annex is located just off the Main Concourse in the Shuttle Passage, next to the Station Master's office. As food is not available for purchase in the Museum, we encourage you to pack a lunch for your visit to the Museum or to purchase food from the many Downtown Brooklyn eateries close to the Museum. Due to the Museum's space limitations, groups visiting without a reservation will only be admitted as capacity allows.
Led by a staff of skilled educators, school programs complement curricular exploration of the New York City history, the engineering sciences, the mathematics and art of subway and station design, and the urban landscape.
Once you fill out the online reservation request form our Reservations Coordinator will be in touch with you to book your program.
Guided tours for adults, active seniors, and college groups highlight exhibitions on building New York's subways, the history of surface transportation, and our historic rolling stock, the gems of our collection. See a complete list of upcoming programs by downloading the most recent Children's calendar.
Once there please depress the call button to the left of the gate to speak with the Museum's admissions coordinator who will dispatch a staff member to assist you. When planning your visit please factor in an additional 10 to 20 minutes to access both levels. For safety reasons, all strollers must use the main entrance on the corner of Boerum Place and Schermerhorn Street.
Most of our objects at the New York Transit Museum, including the train cars, can be touched.
For your safety, heed the instructions of the tour guide, stay with the group at all times, and otherwise follow instructions or signs at the facilities.
Should you be unable to attend, the full price of unused tickets may be treated as a donation to the Transit Museum and is tax deductible to the fullest extent allowed by law. You’ll enjoy free or discounted access to Museum exhibits, programs and special events for one year.
If you wish to bring a friend on a members-only tour, you must be a Dual 2 level member or higher. Led by the Museuma€™s enthusiastic and skilled Education staff, our parties for children 3 and up bring to life over 100 years of transit lore.
Non-members will receive a year-long Family membership, so you can continue to enjoy the Transit Museum all year long! Additional food, such as pizza, bagels or platters, must be supplied by the Museum's approved Local Stop Members.


However, a $50 Party Pack is available from our Museum Store, and includes napkins, plates, cups, and tablecloths with a subway-map print.
Cancellations must be made three weeks prior to the party date to avoid a cancellation fee of 50%. As part of this commitment we are pleased to announce that we will soon be moving into a newly outfitted, environmentally controlled storage space.
This ever-popular exhibition presents a look at the building of New York City's first subway line, various construction methods, and the people who built it. At a series of interactive stops within the exhibition, visitors are encouraged to compare old and new technologies and explore the origin of various fuels used over time, as well as understand steps being taken by Transit's Department of Buses to reduce harmful emissions. In 2012 the City of New York and New York University entered into an agreement to transform 370 Jay Street into a modern, sustainable academic center that will be the foundation of the University’s expanding engineering and applied sciences programs, including their Center for Urban Science and Progress (CUSP). Since its inception more than a quarter century ago, the Museum – which is housed in a historic 1936 IND subway station in Downtown Brooklyn – has grown in scope and popularity.
However, it will also delve into the the building’s history and significance in the evolution of New York City’s transportation system. As the home for staff and operations of those agencies, its 420 perfectly uniform windows hid a secret elevator used to move cash from fare collection trains to the Money Room on the second floor, the famed Subway Command Center, sleek sunlit offices for employees from the chairman to the mail clerks — even a Lost and Found Department full of abandoned umbrellas. Built as part of the Brooklyn Civic Center Urban Renewal project following World War II, 370 Jay St. Since its inception nearly 40 years ago, the Museum, housed in a historic 1936 IND subway station in Downtown Brooklyn, has grown in scope and popularity.
Please go to What's New on this web site for information on the gallery annex's current exhibition.
Our neighborhood Local Stops business partners offer great options for snacks, lunches, and sweet treats.
In addition, visitors in a group larger than 8 persons that would like to use a Lunch Room table must contact the Museum at 718-694-1873 to check availability and inquire about the possibility of reserving a table.
Guided programs for special needs students ensure that all learners benefit equally from a Transit Museum visit.
Located in a 1936 subway station in downtown Brooklyn, the New York Transit Museum brings to life the city's early days and the transit system that made the city grow.
For the best service, please call Meredith Gregory, the Special Education and Access Coordinator at 718-694-1823 (Mon–Fri) a few days before your visit. Payment can be made by credit card (MasterCard, VISA, American Express) or by check or money order payable to: New York Transit Museum. To be admitted to some restricted sites participants must sign a release and provide a copy of a government-issued ID immediately after purchasing tickets. Plus, your support helps the Museum share the rich history of public transportation in the world's greatest city with audiences everywhere.
The Museum’s bi-weekly email newsletter is the best way to get updates about new tour dates and ticket sales! TIME OUT NEW YORK KIDS said wea€™re the a€?perfect place to throw your kid's bash.a€? So join us in the bus drivera€™s seat, stroll along a platform of vintage cars and swipe through the birthday turnstile for a party your child will never forget!
You may also contact the Museum Store to purchase party favors or put together transit-themed goody bags.
During this complex process the Archives and Collections staff will be focused on assuring that every item in the Collection is packed, tracked, safely moved and stored in the new location. The exhibition features pictures taken over 100 years ago during construction, along with historical artifacts and period videos.
The exhibit features the first paper ticket-choppers used in 1904, later turnstile designs that accepted coins and tokens, the MetroCard turnstile currently in operation, and a graphic timeline underscoring milestones in fare collection as well as the fifty year history of the token.
Audio interviews with New York City Transit Department of Buses personnel and a commissioned photo essay A Day in the Life of a Bus complete the streetscape. The New York Transit Museum operates a Gallery Annex in Grand Central Terminal that presents changing exhibitions.
General admission is $7 for adults, $5 for children 2-17 years old, $5 and free on Wednesdays for senior citizens 62 years and up, and free for museum members. Adults and children ages 2 and older can receive free dental screenings and attend oral health education workshops. As custodian and interpreter of the region's extensive public transportation networks, the Museum strives to share, through its public programs, this rich and vibrant history with local, regional, and international audiences. The Museum reserves the right to limit the Lunch Room space without prior notice, based on capacity, use considerations and special events. Prepare for your trip by reviewing our social narrative for an independent visit to the New York Transit Museum. Visit our FAQ pages for more information about the Old City Hall tour and answers to common ticketing questions. Unfortunately this means that we will not be able to accept new acquisitions to the collection or assist with research requests through Summer 2015. The faces of the workers and images of the birth of the subway evoke a sense of awe and appreciation for the dedication, tenacity, and sacrifice of the men who built the subway. Images from the museum's archives not previously displayed show these reliable vintage turnstiles in use in their respective eras. Exhibition sidebars credit two men who were instrumental in the electrification of streetcars and railcars.
As custodian and interpreter of the region’s extensive public transportation networks, the Museum strives to share through its public programs their rich and vibrant history with local, regional, and international audiences. In 2012 the City of New York and New York University entered into an agreement to transform 370 Jay St. Rahilly, a trolley enthusiast whose painstaking depiction of every trolley that ever ran in Brooklyn, is a highlight of the Museum's collections. Woods (1856 – 1910), an African-American inventor who patented more than 60 devices over 30 years that sped development of telegraphs, telephones, and electric trains. The exhibition also tells the story of Elizabeth Jennings Graham (1830 – 1901), an African-American schoolteacher who won a landmark legal decision that defined the rights of people of color to ride any public conveyance on the city's streets. Supreme Court case in the 1950s, that gave African-Americans the right to sit anywhere in a public bus.



How do i change my google chrome theme
Meditation art of living download
Location for the secret garden film


 

  1. 28.07.2014 at 10:22:23
    SeNINLe_SeNSIz writes:
    From that false impression indonesia.
  2. 28.07.2014 at 12:38:25
    8mk writes:
    Oldest heart of yoga in the world, Yoga Institute any particular non secular perception.