Best alternative medicine for acid reflux 99

Signs herpes outbreak is coming

To report on the performance of the line stage AND the phono stage at one time would be too much information.
A pair of 6922-family tubes is used in the phono stage and a pair of 6922 is used as the a€?nominala€? tube type for the line stage.
One of the unique design aspects of the WV is its support of 12-volt based tubes (12AU7, E180CC, 7062, 6829, 5965, etc.) in the line stage. Another attractive WV feature is the ability to use this as a home-theater pass-through and NOT require the WV to be powered on.
As nice as the stepper-motor based remote volume control is here, I wish I had remote mute capability rather than simply the level adjustment. When I heard the ARC SP-8 at a dealer in 1983, the preamp bar had been raised; I came to realize the significant role that a preamp played in the result of a systema€™s musicality. After a few years with the BAT units, I was ready for a major leap in performance like I had attained with the SP-10 purchase 17 years before. With my focus on portrayal of space, other sonic attributes such as a strong bass foundation, low-level resolution and upper-frequency extension and detail have been secondary to me.
I think we often equate sonic characteristics such as tonal coherency, extended trebles and dynamic contrasts as contributors to clarity and purity.
I was scrambling for a high-resolution source to get a handle on the WVa€™s line stage capability compared to the Bent. A return to the Bent and the silence along with the carry-on of the harmonics as they decayed, was much diminished. A return to the WV and the difference was significant: midrange and upper-midrange piano tones had much more energy in their harmonics. After the initial impressions of the WV line stage with the Io Sig and APL player for a couple nights, I played a little bit with the WVa€™s phono stage before I started the line-stage tube-rolling trials. As stated earlier here, with the flip of an internal switch, the line stage supports tubes of the 12au7 family. With the 7062s in the line stage and the Amperex 6922 PQa€™s in the WVa€™s phono stage, I played for a few nights with various PS tubes. Throughout the tube evaluation process, I had one primary thing on my mind: I wanted to recover some of the 3-dimensionality midrange magic that was so inherently strong with the Callisto Sig and somewhat lacking with the Bent. As I was assembling my notes from the last 2-3 months for this report, I wanted to try the Bent one last time this week. The differences between the WV and the Bent are greater now than before due to the WV custom tube set. With the WV loaded with the custom tube set, I have bottom-to-top resolution and dynamic contrasts like never before. Not only has this retest confirmed to me the incredible performance of the WV, but I have greater respect for the Bent as well.
Line Stage Output Impedance: This is not a fixed number, it varies according to the tubetype used.
There was a retrospective of my single screen video dance work as part of the Rotation 03 Festival at the Kiasma Theatre, Helsinki, in association with Helsinki Museum of Contemporary Arts and Finnish National Gallery for Modern Art. This event recognized the achievement to date of a body of work and the evolution of a specific aesthetic and approach to making dance for the screen that has been internationally recognized. My initial impulse to make video dance came when, on graduating from the Laban Centre, London in 1988 with a degree in Dance Theatre, I felt the urge to bring dance to as wide an audience as possible. Fifteen years later, I remain as inspired and excited by video dance as an artistic medium. I am in no way disheartened by this outcome, for what has also happened over the past 15 years is that video dance has come into its own as an art form and there are now many opportunities beyond television for this kind of work to be funded and seen. One of the benefits of having made most of my work independently is that I have been to a great extent free to explore very particular ideas, lines of enquiry and methods of working, in collaboration with many different choreographers and dancers. From a formal point of view, I found Lucinda Childsa€™ exploration of the effect of repetition on our perception of movement intriguing. On reading about Yvonne Rainera€™s work, particularly once she had moved from dance to film-making, I related very strongly to her suggestion that we should find alternative structures than simple narrative closure, in which everything in a story ties up and makes sense by the end.
After Laban, I went to art-college in Dundee to undertake a post-graduate course in Electronic Imaging.
I saw work by video artists like Bill Viola and Gary Hill, which seemed to me to also to take human movement as its subject and through it conveyed the very essence of human existence.
By the time I graduated from art-college, I had made my own connections between various artistic practises and had formed a clear idea of the kind of ideas that inspired me.
The camera, and its relationship to the human body, is central to my approach to making video dance. Whatever the idea for the work, my choices about how to use the camera are strongly influenced by my belief that at the heart of video dance is the expression of human emotion.
Through the use of close ups and different angles, the camera can take the viewer to places they could not usually reach. In my experience, it is often the movement of the body parts outside the frame that creates interesting and active viewing. How the camera moves in relation to the performers is another important aspect of filming dance. However, what I have also discovered is that the carefully choreographed camera can lose out on an important element of dance: the feeling of spontaneity, the energy of the moment, which can make watching someone dance live such an exhilarating experience. When I started out making video dance, I would storyboard everything I planned to film, designing exact shots which explored framing and camera movement in relation to the choreographed dance movement. In order to redress this, and in an attempt to retain the integrity of the dancersa€™ performance, I started to explore a more fluid approach to making video dance.
The idea of improvisation is that those working, in this case the dancers and camera operator, decide how they should move (or how they should film) in the moment. When developing a new video dance work, as the director, I set a series of improvisations with a€?rulesa€™ suggested by knowledge of the possible spatial and motional relationships between camera and dancers. Shooting on video helps this process immensely, as the performers, camera operator and director can look back at the material and together evaluate the effect of certain decisions and types of movement and how things could tried differently. In the context of making video dance, improvisation can be a misunderstood a€“ and scary a€“ word. Whilst it may be accepted that improvisation could be a valid tool for generating ideas and developing material, when it comes to filming material that will be used in the finished video dance, it is usually thought to be wiser to set and rehearse everything before committing to tape. In a€?Pacea€™ (1996), dancer and choreographer Marisa Zanotti and I set out to explore ways of conveying energy and speed on screen. The energy and rawness of a€?Pacea€™ comes very close to what Marisa and I had envisaged and on this basis of this experience, I have continued to use improvisation in many of the video dance works that I have directed. For example, in one sequence around two minutes into a€?Pacea€™, the camera moves with the dancer, following a triangular floor pattern through the studio. Beyond the new technology and the creative opportunities it offered, a€?Pacea€™ was also the first time that I worked with visual artist and editor Simon Fildes. Each of the twenty or so video dance works that I have directed have been very different in terms of their starting point, who I have been collaborating with and the context in which they were made. At some level, all explore a€?perceptiona€™ and the idea that our understanding and interpretation of an action, relationship or moment in time depends on our point of view and the information we are given.
Around three or four years ago, I became particularly interested in developing this idea of how different levels and types of perception, both visual and aural, effect the way in which we understand a situation. In the process of my research, I came across an English company, Touchdown Dance, who work with dancers with visual impairment in the Contact Improvisation form. In a€?Sense-8a€™, the challenge we set ourselves was to take the viewer in deeper and deeper into the performersa€™ experience. Perception is also a strong theme in a€?The Trutha€™, which takes as its starting point the widespread use of CCTV or surveillance images by the media and how these are exploited to develop speculative narratives around certain high profile events.
Together we - Kate, Karin, Simon & Katrina - came up with the concept for a€?The Trutha€™. So we approached the choreographers a€“ Fin Walker (UK) and Paulo Ribeiro (Portugal) - to create the movement for us.
So, although I did come into the studio as the choreographers were creating the movement and look at the movement though the lens, I did not start to make decisions about how the movement would be framed until the choreography was completed.
The third element of material that runs through a€?The Trutha€™ is the surveillance-style images, set on the concourse of a station. Just as the concept of the film is that the truth can look different depending on your point of view, so the camera and editing offer many different points of view on the same moments. Whilst sharing certain stylistic approaches and techniques with the video dance work, the documentaries a€?Adugnaa€™ and a€?Symphonya€™ differ significantly from the video dance work in terms of intention. The challenge in making these films was to capture the essence of the incredible work being done by Royston, his colleagues and the people they work with. Another way in which the documentaries differ from the other works is that the choreography existed in its own right and was not created specially for the camera.
My ambition is to find and communicate ideas that can only be expressed through this hybrid medium and using a style and syntax that is unique to video dance. Particularly a longer work like a€?The Trutha€™ demands us to allow ourselves to experience the emotional flow of the work, to look carefully and actively and to suspend our judgement. What I am more interested in is to take the viewer on an intense emotional journey, one that cannot necessarily be rationalised or explained away in words.
I saw work by video artists like Bill Viola and Gary Hill, which seemed to me to also to take human movement as its subject and through it conveyed the very essence of human existence.A  A touring programme of German video art from the 1980a€™s particularly impressed me. How the camera moves in relation to the performers is another important aspect ofA  filming dance. To buy the DVD Five Video Dances at A?25 including postage and packing you can use the PayPal secure server by clicking here. The WV5 contains a phono stage (MM and MC) and a fully balanced line stage as a single integrated design.
Elliot has reported that listening sessions of the WV compared to his Counterpoint preamps, stock or upgraded, result in the WV outperforming them all.
Elliot was preparing for a new product line that would take his amplifier designs to a new level.
I looked for such a tube line stage a few years ago, and contacted some manufactures to find this feature for the HT system that I have in another room.
One not-so-obvious benefit here is that the amps do not need to be powered off if the user wants to power down the WV.
With the exception of a few ICa€™s, nearly all other components auditioned in my system have retained the portrayal of space and decays to some level of acceptance. Each upgrade here was a refinement from the previous with greater tonal coherency, a lower noise floor and clearly more retrieval of information.
With the Bent, there was a presence in the upper octaves that was very much lacking with the Callisto. The APL Denon player has much more treble extension than the Io Sig, but I needed to hear LPs. The Io Siga€™s strong fundamental was still prominent but there was now some a€?available timea€? for the notes to breathe and show some of their own presence rather than to immediately be smeared by the subsequent note.
It was not in the loudness level of the tones but rather a a€?dimensionala€? signature of the tones. Elliot discusses in his website, the stock tubes in the WV are a good starting point but the WVa€™s performance will be significantly improved through the efforts of the customer to try many tubes. I was not surprised to learn that the Amperex Bugle Boy rectifier tube had clarity and dynamics compared to the other 3 rectifier tubes I had on hand for this evaluation. And there is this new experience of depth with sounds so beautifully placed throughout the region behind the speakers.
That top-tiered TVCa€™s are selling for a few hundred to a few thousand $$ makes them an unbeatable choice for someone not willing or not quite ready to jump in to the costly arena of the great active preamps. Although I was keen to be a choreographer, I was reluctant to make work that, I felt then, would only be seen by other dance enthusiasts at one of the small, dedicated dance theatres in the big cities. These offered a refreshing alternative to the broadcasts of full length ballets a€?livea€™ from the stage at Covent Garden Opera House that then made up the majority of dance on UK television. What is unexpected is that, of the twenty or so video dance works that I have directed in the intervening decade and a half - and although I have directed many hours of broadcast documentary arts programmes - only one of the video dance works I have made has been commission by and seen on television.
The money to make the majority of my video dance has come from both public and private commissions and the resulting works have been screened all over the world - at festivals and in cinemas, theatres and galleries. This article sets out to describe some aspects of this journey and I hope that it will provide an interesting and illuminating context for the five works a€“ three video dances and two dance documentaries a€“ that are being screened as part of the a€?Rotation 03a€™ festival in Helsinki. Whilst at Laban, I came across the work of the post-modern dance makers, for example, Lucinda Childs, Steve Paxton and Yvonne Rainer.
I saw a connection between Childs work and the use of repetition in the music of minimalist such as Steve Reich and Brian Eno, as well as in the dance music that I lost myself in on the dance floor at clubs at the weekend. To paraphrase Rainer, real life often does not have the comfort of closure and so maybe art should not be so tidy either? I wanted to make dance for the screen and I realised that, in order to do so, I would need to learn about video production. These experiences where brought to bear on a series of different collaborations and creative environments.
With the camera, I try to create an energy that involves the viewer in the movement, allowing them to become an active participant in the action, rather than simply a passive observer. When I look at movement through the lens, I try to do so as though I am involved in an interaction with the person or people in front of me.


The lens can enter the dancera€™s kinesphere a€“ the personal space that moves with them as they dance a€“ framing the detail of the movement and allowing an intimacy that would be unattainable in a live performance context.
The framing I chose often focuses on a detail of movement, frustrating the audiences view of the a€?wholea€™, whilst at the same time creating dynamic and tension within the shot and forcing the viewersa€™ imagination to come into play. The choreographed camera, moving through space in relationship to the dancers, alters our perception of the dance, rendering it three-dimensional and creating a fluid and lively viewing experience. This dilemma, and the search to find a solution, has also significantly informed my approach to making video dance. However, over time, I began to feel that what was gained in carefully contrived shots was being lost by a certain lack of fluidity and immediacy in the dancersa€™ performance. Over a number of works, and in collaboration with different dancers and choreographers, I began to use structured improvisation as a creative tool.
They base this decision on their experience of what they see and feel in the moment, informed to a greater or lesser extent by certain ideas, rules, restrictions or a€?scoresa€™. Through rehearsal and repetition, a vocabulary of framing and movement is built up, forming a palette of video dance material that is then a€?choreographeda€™ in the edit suite. In the process, the dancer and camera really do become dancing partners and a sense of a€?livenessa€™ is captured on tape.
However, in my experience, there is a qualitative difference between the performance of video dance material that has been set exactly and that material which retains elements of improvisation. We were determined to make a video dance work a€“ in this case for broadcast on BBC television a€“ that would have the audience sitting on the edge of their seat.
Over a couple of weeks in the studio, Marisa and I developed a series of structured improvisations which were rehearsed and refined until we knew that, come the shooting days, they would generate the type of images we wanted for our video dance. It is through the juxtaposition of different shots and sounds that the work assumes its emotional impact, as characters are revealed through fragments of action and the viewer is drawn through a series of events and states. Firstly, there is editing for the continuity of the live choreography, where the timing and structure of a work originally made for the stage is more or less maintained. However, it was not until a€?Pacea€™, which was the first time I had the opportunity to use a non-linear digital editing system, that I was really able to push this approach to a new extreme. In the edit, we initially a€?recreateda€™ this journey by montage-ing shots from different takes of that particular improvisation. Each time this sequence is repeated, a number of shots are dropped, until in the end it is made up of only three shots. I very quickly realised that Simona€™s input went way beyond being able to operate the editing software. However, there are certain themes that have remained constant throughout almost all of the works. They also all incorporate the fact that the interplay between vision and sound has a great impact on our perception of what is happening on the screen. I also started to think of making a video dance work which would communicate whether you could see it, hear it or see and hear it. Here, my two main areas of interesta€“ improvisation as a creative tool and visual and aural perception a€“ seemed to converge. We hear the dancers describe, to each other and the viewer, what they are seeing, as they move and as they observe. It explores the idea that the same situation can give rise to completely different interpretations, depending on point of view, perspective and other related information.
Usually, I will work with a closely with choreographer to evolve a new idea for a video dance. Related to the idea of different interpretations of the same information that is at the core of a€?The Trutha€™, we then decided that it would add interest and intrigue to work with two choreographers, whose vocabularies and styles differ greatly, thereby giving two different versions of events in the choreography.
We asked them to respond to the concept of a€?trutha€™, but we left them in the dark as regards almost every other aspect of the production a€“ location, costume, sound, filming style and soundtrack. Usually I spend a lot of time in the studio with the dancers and choreographer, developing the camera framing and movement as the dancersa€™ movement evolves. Here we see the four characters, appearing to relate a€“ or not to relate a€“ to each other in very different ways. They challenge us to look again at the same moment a€“ or movement a€“ from a different perspective and to experience how this changes the impact of that moment and the perceived relationship between the characters. They were made as awareness and fund-raising films for Dance United, a UK-based dance development company, headed up by the visionary teacher and choreographer Royston Maldoom. We stove to create two films that contain the factual information that needs to be imparted and whilst at the same time communicate the power and potential of dance as a means of expression and as a tool for social change.
However, the approach we took to filming the choreography was to re-structure it entirely for the screen.
What we are making is not a dance, nor is it a video of a dance, or even for that matter, simply a video. Because it is screen-based work a€“ and therefore by default associated with television a€“ there is the danger that the expectation is that everything should be obvious straight away and on one viewing and for there to be a sense of narrative closure. These offered a refreshing alternative to the broadcasts of full length ballets a€?livea€™ from the stage at Covent Garden Opera House that then made up the majority of dance on UK television.A  Now experienced film and television directors and choreographers were being brought together to experiment with movement, cameras and editing and the results were broadcast to audiences that, although perhaps small by prime-time television standards, were inconceivable in a live theatre context.
Here, highly textural abstract images, unidentifiable, yet obviously derived from images of human action, were edited using repetition, the sound and image interacting and building up rhythms which I found both compelling and very moving. Here, my two main areas of interesta€“ improvisation as a creative tool and visual and aural perception a€“ seemed to converge.A  Together with Touchdowna€™s director Katy Dymoke, I developed an idea which would eventually become a€?Sense-8a€™, a video dance commissioned by the Arts Council of England as part of their Capture scheme. Only the power transformer is in a separate chassis; this is less than half the size of the main chassis. Beyond this, there are options to upgrade the Cardas RCA jacks to WBT, upgrade to the new top-level Vishay TX2575 resistors and a silver-wired umbilical. I was unsuccessful to find such a product and thus stayed with a solid-state product for the HT setup. With the volume all the way down, the WV in Standby, and then powering down the WV, there was a faint buzz through the speakers for a few seconds. But with regular interruptions, being able to silence the system in an instant would be nice.
However, I have dismissed far too many preamps and line stages as they failed in this key parameter.
But unlike any preamp change before, the Aria WV line stage (and phono stage) has made it clear to me what I have missed up to this point.
I could still hear the smearing but the benefits of this new silence between the notes were becoming clear. After hearing the WV for only a short amount of time, returning to the Bent made me only want to get the WV back into the system. The difference was all about the tonal signature of each instrument from its initial sound through the follow-on. And it was only a matter of seconds coming off the Io Sig and into the SUT MC input of the WV, that I realized it was not only the WVa€™s line stage here to redefine performance.
The one tube that he has regularly stated to make a major improvement is the power supply rectifier tube.
Out of these, the Amperex 6922 PQ pinched waist tubes were my favorite as they have been in the CAT 6922 sockets. A CD getting lots of play here has been the Mike and the Mechanics, a€?Beggar on a Gold Beacha€?. A friend of mine who heard this many times here always commented that something was wrong even though it sounded good. This is plenty good for driving cables with no more than 1200pF capacitance and power amps with no less than 50K ohm imput impedance (higher is always better). There are now many individual artists and collaborative teams who have made several video dance works and who, over time, have developed their own unique approaches to making dance for the screen.
Mainly through the books of Sally Banes, and a very few video documentation of performances, I learnt about their revolutionary approaches to making dance in New York in the a€?sixties and a€?seventies. On visits to the south of Spain, I saw Moorish art that used repetition to create beauty and invoke contemplation. What I had not anticipated was that I would come across a whole different area of art a€“ video art a€“ which, in my view, shared much in common with the post-modern dance practises which had so inspired me. Whilst the initial starting point for each of the video dance works I have directed may have be different, the work shares common concerns and approaches. In the need to ensure that a pre-planned camera movement could happen or a certain light and framing came into play, fixed points in space needed to be reached by the dancers.
The various sections of the finished work are based on a series of improvisations which explore different relationships between camera and dancer, and the effect of various lenses, framing choices and ways of moving camera in relation to a variety of explorations of movement ideas by the dancer. The significance of a moment, or movement, is explored as time is slowed down, stretched, speeded up, repeated or stopped by the editing.
Secondly, there is the a€?montagea€™ approach, in which shots are taken from different spatial and temporal contexts and are re-ordered, breaking down completely the sequence of the live action and creating a spatial logic and rhythm unique to the video dance work.
By using the possibilities offered by this new media, I began to really explore the effect on the perception of time and movement of repeated and altered patterns of montage. When you watch the sequence in the finished video dance, in your minda€™s eye the truncated sequence still covers the same ground as it did when it was made up of the full 12 shots and the performer seems to compete the phrase in a dramatically shorted space of time.
He understood the ideas that Marisa and I had been exploring and was able to take them onto new levels through his understanding of editing. This is something that is often done when a dancer with visual impairment or who cannot see at all, is part of a group of Contact Improvisers. In the case of a€?The Trutha€™, however, it was two dancers, Kate Gowar and Karin Fisher-Potisk, the Artistic Directors of the dancer-run company Ricochet Dance Productions, who approached myself and Simon to make a new video dance work.
It was very exciting for us all that these two talented choreographers embraced the challenged of this very a€?hands offa€™ collaboration with such imagination, understanding and commitment. However, this time it felt important that the choreography should follow its own line of development and be created according to the choreographersa€™ and the dancersa€™ understanding of the characters relationships and interactions.
As video dance progresses, our perception of the relationships between these four characters and their relationship to each other is continually altered by the accumulation of information that we glean through the different scenes and interactions a€“ both a€?choreographeda€™ and a€?reala€™ a€“ that we see the characters involved in.
Again, the intention was to capture the essence of the choreographed work and the impact of the dancersa€™ performance.
In all the video dance that I have directed, my collaborators and I have tried to make work that, on one level, demands analysis and thought, and on the other, can be enjoyed on an impressionistic or experiential level.
As a young dance-maker, I saw many of these short a€?video dancea€™ works and was inspired and excited by the potential I could see in this new, hybrid medium. The Aria amps got little press coverage but from what I had read about them, and owning an upgraded NPS400 myself, I had a good feeling that they could be special. An umbilical cable of customer-specified length (typically 6 feet) and captive at the transformer-chassis connects to the audio chassis with a 9-pin connector. I still have to wonder what the sound of the WV might have been with the beefy PS design but the added reliability of the simpler design has its merit as well. The model reviewed here is the WV5 XL (line and phono model) with the TX2575 resistors, the silver-wired umbilical, and the remote volume control. He also notes that rolling the power supply tubes, particularly the rectifier, will significantly increase the WVa€™s performance as well.
This a€?featurea€? is great for tube-rolling tests without the need to power down the amps. However, adding a stepper motor is one thing; adding additional switching or circuitry to accommodate a muting function would likely compromise the performance that Mr. The BAT brought on a different presentation with the music now at the plane of (and behind) the speakers whereas the ARC projected the sound more out into the room. There was clearly a compromise for which one set of priorities had to be chosen over another.
When a Bent TX-102 TVC (with the rare silver transformers) was available in late 2007 at a local dealer, I took it home to play.
Even with the Io Siga€™s softened trebles and average dynamic capabilities, with the WV line stage there was a greater hint of massed strings as a collection of stringed instruments rather than simply a a€?beautifula€? sound. Low-level detail in the music by other musicians was now coming through that had been previously masked.
I never had the opportunity to own his previous top models, but I feel mighty fortunate to own the WV. Moreover, whilst when I started out, I was amongst the first of the so-called a€?hybrida€™ video dance artists, having trained in both dance and the moving image, now in the UK and elsewhere, many undergraduate dance courses offer video dance as an area of both practical and academic study. I was intrigued by the post-modernsa€™ perception of movement as interesting in itself and not necessarily representing anything other than itself and by their presentation of so-called a€?pedestrian movementa€™ as dance. The result often seemed to be that the dancersa€™ movement, and therefore performance, was impeded. For those coming from a narrative film background, where the convention is to work from a pre-written script, improvisation can seem an alien concept, although similar practises have been used by many well-known film-makers.
In other cases, such as a€?Pacea€™ and a€?Sense-8a€™, all the material that was used in the final edit was generated through structured improvisation.
The narratives that emerge tend to be subtle and intriguing, suggested rather than explained, impressionistic rather than literal. The effect is that the speed of the solo dancera€™s movement seems to increase dramatically as the space closes in.
At other times, we catch a€?birda€™s eyea€™ glimpses of the scene from a surveillance-style camera position.
It highlights the fact that we all a€?seea€™ things differently and how our descriptions of what we are seeing and hearing a€“ what we pick up on - reveal a great deal about our perception of our environment.


I hoped this would give the dancersa€™ performance an integrity of its own and help to produce a tension between their action and how the viewer then experiences this through the way the camera and the editing interprets and alters the action.
But for a system configured with balanced sources, I would think at least 2 balanced inputs would be neededa€¦.for a digital player and a tuner or balanced external phono stage. The result was altogether different: the smearing and grain that I had been accustomed to hearing for so many years was gone. The Io Sig renders the fundamental of notes in the mids like no other phono stage I have heard.
I was aware of the cable upgrades (done months ago) to bring on greater resolution to the system, particularly in percussion, but the WV took this to a new level of refinement over its peers. But the WV was altogether in a different league as it was not only about upper-frequency coverage but also in the purity of the delivery of the trebles, and the all-important mids as well. These tones decayed several seconds from behind the speakers as if the speakers were much further into the room.
But it was the SUT input and the WVa€™s phono stage that I was to use for 2 months for all subsequent listening sessions for the line stage and power supply tube-rolling efforts. Evaluating many tubes in 2 of the other 3 PS sockets allowed me to find a combination of PS tubes that worked incredibly well with the Amperex rectifier tube. One interesting note was that I changed the ECC99 tube in the APL Denon player with a 7062 and I was stunned by the benefits.
Perhaps this is what this new experience refers to but I have owned some of the preamps and amps that got high praise of transparency.
This maturing and widening out of video dance means that it has reached the stage where the discussion of the nature of the art form and the support of its continued development can, and must, include very different ways of working, styles of delivery and artistic intentions.
I was also struck by their break away from the conventional theatre setting for dance performances. Dance makers are probably more familiar with the idea of working with improvisation, both as a means of generating material which will then be choreographed and as performance material in its own right. The drama of the chase is then relieved by the gradual introduction of new material, with a very different texture, shape and inherent rhythm.
As the video dance progresses, the camera is drawn closer into the action, until as the viewer you feel as though you too are part of the Contact Improvisation jam. In the edit for a€?Sense-8a€™, we brought all these elements together, adding layers of sound to the montaged visual material to create one fluid, multi-perspective experience of the dance. This blog has been removed which is unfortunate as it gave the reader an opportunity to follow the design decisions for the power supply, audio circuit, volume control, comparison of several step-up transformers, choice of passive parts, etc. Also, if the WV were to be used in an HT setup, it would likely be part of a top-tier HT setup, and these are often balanced systems as well. Harmonics, ambiance and decays were there like I had not before heard from an audio system. And all subsequent preamp models have had this presentation back at the plan of the speakers.
But this comes at a cost with the follow-on of the notesa€™ tonal signature highly truncated.
Still the trebles were a bit weak (due to the Io Sig) compared to piano music that I tried on the APL CD player but I was hearing musical details with the Io Sig like I had not before with the Bent or the Callisto Sig.
I would bring in the APL player to confirm the tube differences I heard when changing line stage or power supply tubes. I now had a nice refinement over the stock PS tubes in terms of midrange smoothness, dynamics and treble clarity. Perhaps the colorations from before added to the sense of what I liked about the Callisto Sig with its strengths clearly coming through in the bottom half of the range.
After playing a few tracks 2-3 times and the system powered on for nearly 3 hours, I put the Bent into the system. And the WV is in such a different performance level than those that I will continue to be cautious of the use of transparency. To pay $8k for a line stage at this performance level is a bargain with all the $15-20k line stages coming out now. But two tubes here took the WV to yet another level beyond the Amperex 6922 PQ with one clearly being the top performer in smoothness, harmonic structure and dynamic contrasts without adding any anomalies that the Amperex 6922 did not have. As outstanding as the Callisto Sig had been for me, the WV is altogether in a whole different league of performance.
But a return to the WV and now the decays that fade are those from the fundamental AND the harmonics. A jump to the Bent and the sound is beautiful, but there is no presence of vibrating strings. And here we have a full function preamp whose phono stage, even with SUTs, significantly outperforming phono stages I have owned that cost from $4-8k. Elliot, I am sure any customer could have these additional connections made to a WV upon order.
I compared the Callisto and Bent for several weeks until I passed the Callisto onto a new owner. After the first night with the WV, I concluded there was one effect taking place that was a new experience to mea€¦.in a word, purity. And this was the first night with the WVa€¦with its stock EH tubes in the line and phono stages and stock PS tubes as well. The WV has this same purity that is far beyond any other line stage to ever be tried in my system. And it was mighty coincidental that the tube to become the reference was also Amperex: the 7062 PQ pinched waist. No doubt the latest Callisto version addresses some of the shortcomings for which the WV excels.
It gives a sense of far greater dynamics but I think it is more to do with the notesa€™ loudness levels lasting longer as the tones shift to the higher frequencies.
THESE VERY SAME ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES, WHO HAVE SWORN TO PROTECT AND SERVE, OUR COUNTRY, AND CITIZENS ,ARE BUT SOME, OF THE CORRUPT,GREEDY TRAITORS .ENGAGED IN THE TYRANNY AND TORTURE. The temptation for me to swap those tubes was strong but I needed to hear the WVa€™s sonic signature for a few days. And this gives each sound that more distinct dimensional signature as it decays in one direction across the room or to the rear for a longer period of time and if there is nothing stopping it. A final return to the WV and the result is layers upon layers of harmonic structured details with the decays seeing no boundaries. When you think of the added cost of another power cord and interconnect for separate phono and line stages, the WVa€™s value is even more apparent. And I followed Mr Elliota€™s suggested burn-in process for two weeks with the CD player driving the phono stagea€™s MM input during the night and day for 2 weeks to achieve 300 hours. The Bent and WV have nearly identical bass extension but with the Bent, there is a bit of bass a€?thumpynessa€? vs.
And add to this the possibility of custom design work and modifications, which is unheard of with all the top preamp manufacturers out there, the WV customer has more options than ever before.
Just as a few tubes were able to take the WV to top-end performance, a few, most notably the 6H30, let none of the WVa€™s capability through. The school district has moved to a biometric identification program, saying students will no longer have to use an ID card to buy lunch.A  BIOMETRICS TO TRACK YOUR KIDS!!!!!i»?i»?A TARGETED INDIVIDUALS, THE GREEDY CRIMINALS ARE NOW CONDONING THEIR TECH! Paul Weindling, history of medicine professor at Oxford Brookes University, describes his search for the lost victims of Nazi experiments. The chairman of the board at ESL a€” then proprietor of the desert wasteland in Nevada known as a€?Area 51a€? a€” was William Perry, who would be appointed secretary of defense several years later. EUCACH.ORG PanelIn a 2-hour wide-ranging Panel with Alfred Lambremont Webre on the Transhumanist Agenda, Magnus Olsson, Dr.
Henning Witte, and Melanie Vritschan, three experts from the European Coalition Against Covert Harassment, revealed recent technological advances in human robotization and nano implant technologies, and an acceleration of what Melanie Vritschan characterized as a a€?global enslavement programa€?.Shift from electromagnetic to scalar wavesThese technologies have now shifted from electromagnetic wave to scalar waves and use super quantum computers in the quantum cloud to control a€?pipesa€? a reference to the brains of humans that have been taken over via DNA, via implants that can be breathed can breach the blood-brain barrier and then controlled via scalar waved on a super-grid. Eventually, such 'subvocal speech' systems could be used in spacesuits, in noisy places like airport towers to capture air-traffic controller commands, or even in traditional voice-recognition programs to increase accuracy, according to NASA scientists."What is analyzed is silent, or sub auditory, speech, such as when a person silently reads or talks to himself," said Chuck Jorgensen, a scientist whose team is developing silent, subvocal speech recognition at NASA Ames Research Center in California's Silicon Valley. We numbered the columns and rows, and we could identify each letter with a pair of single-digit numbers," Jorgensen said. People in noisy conditions could use the system when privacy is needed, such as during telephone conversations on buses or trains, according to scientists."An expanded muscle-control system could help injured astronauts control machines.
If an astronaut is suffering from muscle weakness due to a long stint in microgravity, the astronaut could send signals to software that would assist with landings on Mars or the Earth, for example," Jorgensen explained.
These are processed to remove noise, and then we process them to see useful parts of the signals to show one word from another," Jorgensen said.After the signals are amplified, computer software 'reads' the signals to recognize each word and sound.
Our Research and Development Division has been in contact with the Federal Bureau of Prisons, the California Department of Corrections, the Texas Department of Public Safety, and the Massachusetts Department of Correction to run limited trials of the 2020 neural chip implant. We have established representatives of our interests in both management and institutional level positions within these departments. Federal regulations do not yet permit testing of implants on prisoners, but we have entered nto contractual agreements with privatized health care professionals and specified correctional personnel to do limited testing of our products. We need, however, to expand our testing to research how effective the 2020 neural chip implant performs in those identified as the most aggressive in our society.
In California, several prisoners were identified as members of the security threat group, EME, or Mexican Mafia. They were brought to the health services unit at Pelican Bay and tranquilized with advanced sedatives developed by our Cambridge,Massachussetts laboratories.
The results of implants on 8 prisoners yielded the following results: a€?Implants served as surveillance monitoring device for threat group activity.
However, during that period substantial data was gathered by our research and development team which suggests that the implants exceed expected results. One of the major concerns of Security and the R & D team was that the test subject would discover the chemial imbalance during the initial adjustment period and the test would have to be scurbbed.
However, due to advanced technological developments in the sedatives administered, the 48 hour adjustment period can be attributed t prescription medication given to the test subjects after the implant procedure. One of the concerns raised by R & D was the cause of the bleeding and how to eliminate that problem. Unexplained bleeding might cause the subject to inquire further about his "routine" visit to the infirmary or health care facility. Security officials now know several strategies employed by the EME that facilitate the transmission of illegal drugs and weapons into their correctional facilities. One intelligence officier remarked that while they cannot use the informaiton that have in a court of law that they now know who to watch and what outside "connections" they have.
The prison at Soledad is now considering transferring three subjects to Vacaville wher we have ongoing implant reserach.
Our technicians have promised that they can do three 2020 neural chip implants in less than an hour. Soledad officials hope to collect information from the trio to bring a 14 month investigation into drug trafficking by correctional officers to a close. Essentially, the implants make the unsuspecting prisoner a walking-talking recorder of every event he comes into contact with.
There are only five intelligence officers and the Commisoner of Corrections who actually know the full scope of the implant testing. In Massachusetts, the Department of Corrections has already entered into high level discussion about releasing certain offenders to the community with the 2020 neural chip implants. Our people are not altogether against the idea, however, attorneys for Intelli-Connection have advised against implant technology outside strick control settings. While we have a strong lobby in the Congress and various state legislatures favoring our product, we must proceed with the utmost caution on uncontrolled use of the 2020 neural chip.
If the chip were discovered in use not authorized by law and the procedure traced to us we could not endure for long the resulting publicity and liability payments. Massachusetts officials have developed an intelligence branch from their Fugitive Task Force Squad that would do limited test runs under tight controls with the pre-release subjects. Correctons officials have dubbed these poetnetial test subjects "the insurance group." (the name derives from the concept that the 2020 implant insures compliance with the law and allows officials to detect misconduct or violations without question) A retired police detective from Charlestown, Massachusetts, now with the intelligence unit has asked us to consider using the 2020 neural chip on hard core felons suspected of bank and armored car robbery.
He stated, "Charlestown would never be the same, we'd finally know what was happening before they knew what was happening." We will continue to explore community uses of the 2020 chip, but our company rep will be attached to all law enforcement operations with an extraction crrew that can be on-site in 2 hours from anywhere at anytime. We have an Intelli-Connection discussion group who is meeting with the Director of Security at Florence, Colorado's federal super maximum security unit. The initial discussions with the Director have been promising and we hope to have an R & D unit at this important facilitly within the next six months. Napolitano insisted that the department was not planning on engaging in any form of ideological profiling.
I will tell him face-to-face that we honor veterans at DHS and employ thousands across the department, up to and including the Deputy Secretary," Ms.
Steve Buyer of Indiana, the ranking Republican on the House Committee on Veterans' Affairs, called it "inconceivable" that the Obama administration would categorize veterans as a potential threat.



Cold sores herpes 2 utbrudd
Herpes test values 2014
Natural treatment for mild asthma


Comments
  1. 66 11.01.2014 at 19:25:16
    In his 2003 book, Medical Herbalism: The Science and.
  2. Gentlemen 11.01.2014 at 21:31:27
    Fascinating, as a result of ways to increase my energy level diagram it takes what's so horrible in regards the Phase 1 trial had given a sign any cure for.
  3. BHB 11.01.2014 at 21:20:57
    Often is used to deal with this can present aid especially when you are.
  4. Narin_Yagish 11.01.2014 at 10:56:21
    Examined among examine contributors who've beforehand been hSV529 is formulated, like for Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV1.