Marvel’s Civil War is one of my favorite comic book stories of all time, and definitely my favorite Marvel 616 story to be sure. After a rookie super-hero group inadvertently causes the death of over 900 civilians while fighting dangerous super criminals, the US government enacts the Superhuman Registration Act, requiring all metahumans to register with the US government to be trained and regulated much like police officers, revealing their identities and full extent of their powers in the process.
Anyway, I had some free time and I thought to myself, what would happen if the same thing happened in the DC Universe? A government boogieman herself, Waller will undoubtedly side with Registration, using all the resources at her disposal to help the government enforce the new law with extreme prejudice. Driven by his own conscience, Ray truly believes registration is the right step for the metahuman community. A little naive on the complexities involved in politics, ten-year-old Billy sees the issue as one of black and white. Booster has never been one to lay low, believing the new law provides a perfect opportunity to have his time in the sun, he sides with Registration. After registration becomes law, the government reinstates the active military status of all Metahumans who had once been part of the service. A public figure along side Beast Boy as former leader of the Teen Titans, and current member of the Justice League, Cyborg truly believes that Registration is the next logical step in superhuman politics. Swayed by her friendship with Cyborg and Beast Boy, as well as an unwillingness to stoop to the shadows and stand in outright defiance of the law and the will of the American people, Donna reluctantly stands with the Registration, against many of her long time friends. With his identity already known to the public, and with sensibilities that lean in the direction of registration, Elongated Man takes a stand on the side of superhuman reform.
Believing that the new law makes perfect sense, Firestorm serves as an ambassador for the cause of registration those on the fence. With his identity out in the open, his seat as the mayor of Star city, and strong liberal political views, Oliver Queen makes the toughest decision of his life, and gives his support to the registration cause. Believing in the general idea of the new law, this husband and wife team side with their pro-registration colleagues from the JSA. An old patriot, Jay just can’t see himself fighting against the country he’s fought so long to protect. Believing the new law to be a perfect opportunity to gain the upper hand against many a superhuman foe, Lex gives his undying support to the US Government, developing weapons, soldiers, and prisons to take down and contain rogue heroes who refuse to obey the new law.
Contracted by the government and wanting to stay on the right side of the law, Doc Magnus devotes his Metal Men to the side of Registration, even if some of them have doubts themselves. Having worked as a metahuman agent for the president in the past, Power Girl was wary of the government’s plans. Red Tornado believes that the registration act is the most effective way to make this country safe for his daughter Traya. Finding it hard to sympathize with anti-registration sentiment, Stargirl takes a black and white stance on the issue on the side of registration. At the beck and call of Amanda Waller, these supervillains are forced into the service of the government under penalty of death. Generally believing in the good of the idea, Ted sides with registration, sort of comforted by the presence of his long time friend Booster Gold. Already off the grid, Cassandra sides with her mentors Batman and Barbara Gordon as well as the rest of her newfound Bat-family.
Unphased and almost indifferent about the new law, at first Batman cares little if others use him as a rally point for the superhuman resistance, he’ll continue to do what he’s always done, protect the innocent from the shadows. Not about to unmask willingly, Black lightning tries to continue the good fight, while dodging the government sanctioned cape-hunters, and pro-registration heroes.
Young and headstrong, Jaime doesn’t want to risk the public attention of unmasking, or the safety to his family and friends. Not about to unmask willingly, Bumblebee tries to continue the good fight, while dodging the government sanctioned cape-hunters, and pro-registration heroes.
Sympathetic to the plight of anti-registration heroes, Gang Buster comes out of retirement to aid the resistance.
Approached by Cadmus Labs to lead the official government led hunt for anti-registration heroes, Guardian actively refuses to hunt down his friends and colleagues and if forced to go on the run.
Even with his identity already made public, Guy is indifferent for the most part about Earth politics. The Superhuman Registration Act just doesn’t sit right with Hal’s gut, and Hal always trusts his gut.
Not about to unmask willingly, Metamorpho tries to continue the good fight, while dodging the government sanctioned cape-hunters, and pro-registration heroes. Usually adopting a different point of view than her father, Natasha stays true to form in joining the resistance, feeling it’s wrong for the government to demand that superheroes reveal their secret identities and become public servants.
A leading light for the resistance, Nightwing has adopted much of Batman’s ideology but little of his reserved nature.
Siding with her fellow members of the Bat family, Oracle is no stranger when it comes to siding against the government. Not one to let others tell him what to do, Plas joins up with the resistance, confident that if he sticks with Batman, everything will turn out alright. A tad reluctant himself to break ranks with the law, Tim’s loyalty to Batman far outweighs any misgivings he may have. Never one to play by the rules anyway, Roy wholeheartedly believes that the new law is wrong, and he’ll fight against it with all his might. Not about to unmask willingly, Sandman tries to continue the good fight, while dodging the government sanctioned cape-hunters, and pro-registration heroes. Following Dick Grayson’s lead, Starfire pledges her loyalty and her super human power to the resitance. The new law is all part of a massive conspiracy that’s been building for hundreds of years. Not about to unmask willingly, The Ray tries to continue the good fight, while dodging the government sanctioned cape-hunters, and pro-registration heroes.
Conflicted over siding against his long time mentor Barry Allen, Wally is also conflicted about his feelings towards the new law. Not about to unmask willingly, Wildcat tries to continue the good fight, while dodging the government sanctioned cape-hunters, and pro-registration heroes.
Not one to let others make her decisions for her, already unmasked to begin with, Cassandra sympathizes with her friends and tries to continue the good fight, while dodging the government sanctioned cape-hunters, and pro-registration heroes.
Independent and strong willed, Black Canary sees little good in disrupting things from how they’ve always been. Not wanting to be drawn into a strictly American issue, Wonder Woman withdraws to Paradise Island.
Conflicted on which side has the moral high ground, and further conflicted with whom he should place his loyalty between Hal and John, Kyle struggles with what to do during this Civil War. An officer of the law, and also a staunch believer in the power of masked crime fighters, Jim Gordan struggles on which side to take.
Not about to be a government stooge dispatched to hunt down his friends in allies, nor is he willing to actively work against the American government or the American people, Superman remains decidedly neutral in this conflict. The laws of the surface dwellers rarely have any effect on Aquaman or his kingdom, he decides not to get himself or Atlantis involved in American politics.
Not wanting to take a side, J’onn chooses rather to remain neutral than fight against his friends on one side or another. After the instant reaction of the road trip, Ben and Evan are joined by Steve to give Civil War another go ’round. And what kind of weight can this movie carry in the light of  current American political situations?
Ben and Evan take another road trip to the movies, this time to see Captain America: Civil War, featuring the screen debut of Black Panther and Spider-Man and the biggest collection of Marvel heroes on the screen yet!


In Retro Movie Missions the Retronauts fire the Retro-rockets on their Retro-starship to take a look back at some retro-movies! Join Captain Ben, Sergeant Steve, and Ensign Evan as they explore the Disney sci-fi movie BLACK HOLE! With the new Star Wars teaser release, Ben, Steve, and Evan talk about their thoughts of the teaser and address some items from the mailbag! Ben and Evan are joined by three friends to take another trip to the theater…this time to see BATMAN v. From Star Wars to X-Files to Heroes, old heroes have been making a return…and they make their return, well, older!
In this episode we take a look at some of our favorite and not so favorite returns and what those returns bring with them! The government’s finally going to reveal what Fox Mulder has been waiting for all these years .
The X-Files has returned, and Steve and Ben WERE pretty excited…and now they are ready to wade through the final three episodes! A monster of the week, a supernatural FBI tale, and a mythology episode again give a pretty good sampling of what the X-Files was all about, but how did it live up to the X-Files’ legacy?
Join Captain Ben, Sergeant Steve, and Ensign Evan as they explore Jim Henson’s classic movie LABYRINTH! A transmedia project about an secret group of multi-generational warriors in the never-ending battle against evil, League of the Gray is part Buffy the Vampire Slayer and part Golden Girls! Ben talks with Sandy Brownlee, the mastermind behind this web series, about the project’s origins, its future, and how people can help this transmedia project come to fruition! The X-Files has returned, and Steve and Ben are pretty excited…although we have different reactions to SOME of these first three episodes of X-Files season 10. With a mythology episode, a mystery episode, and a humor episode, the first three episodes of this six episode series give a pretty good sampling of what the X-Files was all about, but how did it live up to the X-Files’ legacy? Also, Ben and Steve welcome Evan officially into the fold as the fourth “strange alien”!
For a holiday treat, we read Charles Dickens’ precursor to A Christmas Carol, The Goblins Who Stole a Sexton, a chapter from The Pickwick Papers. This episode has conversation on the way, conversation in the theater before the movie started, some parking lot conversation after the movie, and commentary on the drive home!
Ben is joined by four of his five kids to talk about their thoughts and reactions to the Star Wars prequel trilogy!
Ben and Steve are joined by Evan David to discuss some of their favorite “very special Christmas” episodes of TV shows, movies, and comics! Ben and Steve open up the listener feedback mailbag and discuss a few responses to our recent episodes. Ben and Steve take a look back at all 19 Jaws movies, from Jaws to Jaws 4: The Revenge, from Cyberjaws to Jaws in NY, from the prequels to the reboot to the return to the original continuity in this year’s Jaws 19! 1906: Availability of panchromatic black and white film and therefore high quality color separation color photography. G+ #Read of the Day: The Daguerreotype - The daguerreotype, an early form of photograph, was invented by Louis Daguerre in the early 19th c. The first photograph (1826) - Joseph Niepce, a French inventor and pioneer in photography, is generally credited with producing the first photograph. Easy Peasy Fact:Following Niepcea€™s experiments, in 1829 Louis Daguerre stepped up to make some improvements on a novel idea.
Looking at the relationship between God and man through the lens of science fiction and fantasy . Naturally, there are many different reactions to the new law throughout the superhuman community.
So I made some lists, thought through a little bit of a possible story, and here’s what I came up with! These individuals side with the United States Government, and have chosen to register themselves in accordance with the new law, reveal their secret identities to the government, and become legally licensed and officially deputized Super Heroes.
While saddened at the prospect of fighting old friends, he lends his full support to the cause of registration.
While he does sympathize with those who want to keep their identity a secret, Beast Boy believes that registration is the next step to be taken in a changing world. This includes former airman Captain Atom, whose sense of loyalty to his country far outweighs any nagging doubts about the new law. A step that needs to be made by all, if the American people are to truly put their trust in heroes again.
Second-guessing himself at every turn, Ollie must fight an internal battle as well as an external one, and that against one of his best friends, Hal Jordan.
He sides with registration, taking some small comfort from the presence of Barry Allen and his friends from the JSA. A former marine, John’s beliefs and sense of duty bind him heart and soul to the cause of registration. Terrific believes that unless the registration act is put in place to check the growing number of metahumans, the world is in for disaster.
After long talks with many a mentor, she decides to plant her flag on the side of Registration. These heroes have chosen not to comply with the new law, but instead to become fugitives, while at the same time continuing their hero work. He joins the resistance partly in support of Hal Jordan, and partly just to stick it to the man. Hal becomes an active leader for the resistance, lending his power, and his voice to the cause. Nightwing presses forward with boldness and conviction, leading the resistance members against the registered heroes.
But seeing his friends like Dick, Roy, and Starfire in trouble, Wally hesitantly lends his Super Speed to the resistance.
Steve, and Evan talk about the career of animator Don Bluth, looking back on their favorite memories from Bluth’s body of work, and on some of their least favorite work from him, from his work at Disney to his arcade video games to Fievel and The Land Before Time to Titan AE! And don’t forget to check out The Crossover Network for more holiday podcast episodes! Night’s latest film, which seems to be not just a return to form but a return to passion. Talbot was active from the mid-1830s, and sits alongside Louis Daguerre as one of the fathers of the medium.
Niepcea€™s photograph shows a view from the Window at Le Gras, and it only took eight hours of exposure time!The history of photography has roots in remote antiquity with the discovery of the principle of the camera obscura and the observation that some substances are visibly altered by exposure to light. Again employing the use of solvents and metal plates as a canvas, Daguerre utilized a combination of silver and iodine to make a surface more sensitive to light, thereby taking less time to develop. Some support the law, others actively defy it, thus Marvel’s heroes are thrown into a Civil War against each other, resulting in some great story telling opportunities with intense action and drama! No stranger to hunting down former allies when they step outside the law, he gives his full and unwavering support to Registration. Catwoman bides her time and sticks close to the Bat-family, hoping to ride out the Civil War unscathed. Hard times lay ahead with Hal forced to turn against two of his best friends, Barry Allen and Oliver Queen. Porta (1541-1615), a wise Neapolitan, was able to get the image of well-lighted objects through a small hole in one of the faces of a dark chamber; with a convergent lens over the enlarged hole, he noticed that the images got even clearer and sharper. Though he is most famous for his contributions to photography, he was also an accomplished painter and a developer of the diorama theatre.


As far as is known, nobody thought of bringing these two phenomena together to capture camera images in permanent form until around 1800, when Thomas Wedgwood made the first reliably documented although unsuccessful attempt. Schulze mixes chalk, nitric acid, and silver in a flask; notices darkening on side of flask exposed to sunlight.
A daguerreotype, produced on a silver-plated copper sheet, produces a mirror image photograph of the exposed scene. The alchemist Fabricio, more or less at the same period of time, observed that silver chloride was darkened by the action of light. Chemistry student Robert Cornelius was so fascinated by the chemical process involved in Daguerrea€™s work that he sought to make some improvements himself. It was only two hundred years later that the physicist Charles made the first photographic impression, by projecting the outlines of one of his pupils on a white paper sheet impregnated with silver chloride. It was commercially introduced in 1839, a date generally accepted as the birth year of practical photography.The metal-based daguerreotype process soon had some competition from the paper-based calotype negative and salt print processes invented by Henry Fox Talbot. And in 1839 Cornelius shot a self-portrait daguerrotype that some historians believe was the first modern photograph of a man ever produced.
The photos were turned into lantern slides and projected in registration with the same color filters.
In 1802, Wedgwood reproduced transparent drawings on a surface sensitized by silver nitrate and exposed to light. Nicephore Niepce (1765-1833) had the idea of using as sensitive material the bitumen, which is altered and made insoluble by light, thus keeping the images obtained unaltered. Long before the first photographs were made, Chinese philosopher Mo Ti and Greek mathematicians Aristotle and Euclid described a pinhole camera in the 5th and 4th centuries BCE. He communicated his experiences to Daguerre (1787-1851) who noticed that a iodide-covered silver plate - thedaguerreotype -, by exposition to iodine fumes, was impressed by the action of light action, and that the almost invisible alteration could be developed with the exposition to mercury fumes.
In the 6th century CE, Byzantine mathematician Anthemius of Tralles used a type of camera obscura in his experimentsIbn al-Haytham (Alhazen) (965 in Basra a€“ c. It was then fixed with a solution of potassium cyanide, which dissolves the unaltered iodine.The daguerreotype (1839) was the first practical solution for the problem of photography. In 1841, Claudet discovered quickening substances, thanks to which exposing times were shortened. More or less at the same time period, EnglishWilliam Henry Talbot substituted the steel daguerreotype with paper photographs (named calotype). Wilhelm Homberg described how light darkened some chemicals (photochemical effect) in 1694. Niepce of Saint-Victor (1805-1870), Nicephorea€™s cousin, invented the photographic glass plate covered with a layer of albumin, sensitized by silver iodide.
The novel Giphantie (by the French Tiphaigne de la Roche, 1729a€“74) described what could be interpreted as photography.Around the year 1800, Thomas Wedgwood made the first known attempt to capture the image in a camera obscura by means of a light-sensitive substance.
Maddox and Benett, between 1871 and 1878, discovered the gelatine-bromide plate, as well as how to sensitize it.
As with the bitumen process, the result appeared as a positive when it was suitably lit and viewed. A strong hot solution of common salt served to stabilize or fix the image by removing the remaining silver iodide. On 7 January 1839, this first complete practical photographic process was announced at a meeting of the French Academy of Sciences, and the news quickly spread. At first, all details of the process were withheld and specimens were shown only at Daguerre's studio, under his close supervision, to Academy members and other distinguished guests. Paper with a coating of silver iodide was exposed in the camera and developed into a translucent negative image. Unlike a daguerreotype, which could only be copied by rephotographing it with a camera, a calotype negative could be used to make a large number of positive prints by simple contact printing. The calotype had yet another distinction compared to other early photographic processes, in that the finished product lacked fine clarity due to its translucent paper negative. This was seen as a positive attribute for portraits because it softened the appearance of the human face. Talbot patented this process,[20] which greatly limited its adoption, and spent many years pressing lawsuits against alleged infringers. He attempted to enforce a very broad interpretation of his patent, earning himself the ill will of photographers who were using the related glass-based processes later introduced by other inventors, but he was eventually defeated.
Nonetheless, Talbot's developed-out silver halide negative process is the basic technology used by chemical film cameras today. Hippolyte Bayard had also developed a method of photography but delayed announcing it, and so was not recognized as its inventor.In 1839, John Herschel made the first glass negative, but his process was difficult to reproduce.
The new formula was sold by the Platinotype Company in London as Sulpho-Pyrogallol Developer.Nineteenth-century experimentation with photographic processes frequently became proprietary.
This adaptation influenced the design of cameras for decades and is still found in use today in some professional cameras.
Petersburg, Russia studio Levitsky would first propose the idea to artificially light subjects in a studio setting using electric lighting along with daylight. In 1884 George Eastman, of Rochester, New York, developed dry gel on paper, or film, to replace the photographic plate so that a photographer no longer needed to carry boxes of plates and toxic chemicals around.
Now anyone could take a photograph and leave the complex parts of the process to others, and photography became available for the mass-market in 1901 with the introduction of the Kodak Brownie.A practical means of color photography was sought from the very beginning. Results were demonstrated by Edmond Becquerel as early as 1848, but exposures lasting for hours or days were required and the captured colors were so light-sensitive they would only bear very brief inspection in dim light.The first durable color photograph was a set of three black-and-white photographs taken through red, green and blue color filters and shown superimposed by using three projectors with similar filters. It was taken by Thomas Sutton in 1861 for use in a lecture by the Scottish physicist James Clerk Maxwell, who had proposed the method in 1855.[27] The photographic emulsions then in use were insensitive to most of the spectrum, so the result was very imperfect and the demonstration was soon forgotten. Maxwell's method is now most widely known through the early 20th century work of Sergei Prokudin-Gorskii.
Included were methods for viewing a set of three color-filtered black-and-white photographs in color without having to project them, and for using them to make full-color prints on paper.[28]The first widely used method of color photography was the Autochrome plate, commercially introduced in 1907. If the individual filter elements were small enough, the three primary colors would blend together in the eye and produce the same additive color synthesis as the filtered projection of three separate photographs. Autochrome plates had an integral mosaic filter layer composed of millions of dyed potato starch grains.
Reversal processing was used to develop each plate into a transparent positive that could be viewed directly or projected with an ordinary projector. The mosaic filter layer absorbed about 90 percent of the light passing through, so a long exposure was required and a bright projection or viewing light was desirable.
Competing screen plate products soon appeared and film-based versions were eventually made. A complex processing operation produced complementary cyan, magenta and yellow dye images in those layers, resulting in a subtractive color image.
Kirsch at the National Institute of Standards and Technology developed a binary digital version of an existing technology, the wirephoto drum scanner, so that alphanumeric characters, diagrams, photographs and other graphics could be transferred into digital computer memory.
The lab was working on the Picturephone and on the development of semiconductor bubble memory. The essence of the design was the ability to transfer charge along the surface of a semiconductor.
Michael Tompsett from Bell Labs however, who discovered that the CCD could be used as an imaging sensor.




Yw leadership training ideas army
The truth about forever book depository


Comments

  1. 07.01.2014 at 23:37:21


    Where your understanding about fossils, microorganisms and life sciences can continued uninterrupted.

    Author: nedostupnaya
  2. 07.01.2014 at 12:12:26


    App is a huge time saver and.

    Author: Seninle_Sensiz
  3. 07.01.2014 at 10:49:45


    The very first lottery to provide.

    Author: shokaladka
  4. 07.01.2014 at 10:54:23


    The $319 million won by a group of state.

    Author: Togrul