I was interviewed yesterday by a researcher at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government for a case study on the role weblogs played in the downfall of Trent Lott. Another cool thing about driving to NY is when you get close enough to see big green Interstate highway signs that say New York City. We're getting close to June 14, when, last year, to people who read this site I just disappeared.
Ed Cone links to a story from Mark Tosczak, a NY Times stringer, on getting credit for his work. I've given Tim Bray his share of grief, but in this piece about the state of CSS, he nails it.
Four years ago: "Salon (justifiably) brags that they've matured to the point where they could send a reporter to Yugoslavia. Cory Doctorow reports on an Apple update that makes it so that iTunes can only stream to people on the same subnet. On Thursday I'm giving a keynote at the Open Source Content Management conference, or OSCOM.
There's been a bit of discussion about my last DaveNet piece, mostly users talking about what they're willing to pay, as if they have all the power. The power of the software developer not to develop is largely silent, so people don't consider it. A professional software organization for a well-supported product has 10-20 people, maybe as many as 30 to 40. Let's say you spend 100 hours a year using a piece of software and assume your time is worth $50 per hour. I don't know if this means anything but there are no stories on Google News about Colorado Governor Bill Owens's veto of the state "Super-DMCA" law.
Robert Wiener writes to say that searching for Colorado and veto gets a bunch of hits on Google.
Speaking of Google, I was kind of bored and wanted to see how my investment in John Doerr was doing, so I fired up Google, and lo and behold, my story is #3. I wonder why some weblogs so openly say things that are just plain wrong, that are so easily refuted, without presenting the opposing data, or even suggesting it might exist with a disclaimer like imho, or ymmv, or ianal. Most places I don't expect journalism, but some places I do, and they disappoint often enough to make it noteworthy. One thread on a respected blogger's site gives the whole weblog tools market to one of the companies. BBC: "Jodi Plumb, 15, from Mansfield, Nottinghamshire, was horrified to discover an entire site had been created to insult and threaten her.
Ellen Ullman: "To listen to Mr Engelbart that day almost five years ago was to realize that the computer industry, when it started, was not simply about becoming a chief executive or retiring on stock options at 35.
Sjoerd: "It is noisy outside, and 2 riot police cars are racing by, because ADO Den Haag has won the 1st division soccer leage. Flying over Boston or NY it's astonishing how much real estate is used to house dead people. I was sitting in a law school cafeteria yesterday thinking how far away I was from the threat of terrorism.
Ben Edelman, a Harvard Law student and fellow at Berkman, has been studying Gator, one of the leading advertising servers. Marketing Profs: "Blogs offer the human voice, which can be loud, controversial, and even wacky. A few people have suggested asking people to send Google API keys they aren't using and rotate them to work around the fatal flaw.
BTW, some people said the Nikon took better pics than the Sony I use now, but I don't think so. Evan Hansen: "Paralyzed by fears of piracy, the record labels have taken years to get their act together for online distribution. Bloki is "a Web site on which you can create Web pages, right in your browser, with no additional software required. Microsoft's decision to support RSS without arguing over what it is looks smarter every day.
Scoble, who works at Microsoft now, says he likes using a desktop app to write his internal weblog. Disclaimer: I've been trying to work on weblog-tool compatibility issues with Google for the last few weeks. Lawyers today find that traditional discovery methods of obtaining information are not satisfactory. CDLS assists attorneys in obtaining computerized data from third parties in connection with litigation matters. Our investigators have access to multiple extensive databases that can uncover many issues that individuals may want to keep secret.
Our team can also do legal research, retrieve records from courthouses throughout the state as well as from local and rural police and sheriff offices. On many occasions our personnel have been called upon to determine damages from the assimilated data.
From the taking of a few dollars in a petty cash fund to making erroneous entries in accounting software, the methods to steal are numerous. Our forensic accounting experts have the knowledge and experience required to apply various accounting, auditing, and other investigative techniques to determine not only the perpetrators and scheme employed but also how it was accomplished without detection. Our staff works directly with the client to ascertain those actions required and precisely document details of the event to prevent it from occurring in the future. While new laws have made the discovery process easier now than it has ever been, the acquisition of desired data is now more difficult than ever.
Our forensic experts examine all forms of electronic evidence, even if perceived deleted or destroyed. We know that Jacques RanciA?re speaks about the relation between politics and aesthetics in terms of a€?the distribution of the sensible.a€? Tonight I want to speak about the distribution of the insensible. But I also want to register an implicit critical dimension of this argument, a critique of RanciA?re and of his presently immense influence, which I view as unwarranted. By way of a first approach to what I mean by a€?the distribution of the insensible,a€? leta€™s recall some basic passages from Volume One of Capital on the transformation of materials.
Labor is, first of all, a process between man and nature, a process by which man, through his own actions, mediates, regulates and controls the metabolism between himself and nature. What distinguishes capitalism as a mode of production, however, is the peculiar manner in which the transformation of materials through the labor process is shadowed by the process of valorization. We can thus view the process of production either from the perspective of the labor process or the valorization process. So, this brief summary of Marxist fundamentals is our first approach to the distribution of the insensible.
In Intellectual and Manual Labor, Alfred Sohn-Rethel argues that the social abstraction of the value form and the exchange relation gives rise to our abstract forms of thought.
The exchange abstraction excludes everything that makes up history, human and even natural history. In Sohn-Rethela€™s account, the exchange relation gives rise to a social genesis of the transcendental (the forms of intuition and the categories of the understanding).
In the act of exchange, the natural and material physicality of the product is negated by the abstract value of the commodity, and this negation constitutes the a€?positive realitya€? of the social physicality of the exchange process. The history of modernity, which is to say the history of capitalism, is also the history of modern technology. And thena€”in the discourse network of 2000, spawned by the cybernetic systems, information theories, and encryption technologies of World War II, digital technology draws media differentiation back together through the synthetic resources of digital code, a universal medium traversing audio, video, and textual recording. However (fourth approach)a€”we should recognize that just as Kittlera€™s media theory offers a necessary supplement to Sohn-Rethela€™s account of the social genesis of conceptual abstraction, it is also necessary to submit Kittlera€™s own work to a Marxist inversion.
What Marx calls a€?formal subsumptiona€? is the initial subsumption of labor under the value form, through wage labor and exploitation (the extraction of surplus value from surplus labor time).
This contradiction bears upon the history of technology, because it is by revolutionizing the means of production that capital attempts to overcome this contradiction. The same process also generates a different problem: as automation increases, less labor power is required. Automation, which is at once the most advanced sector of modern industry and the epitome of its practice, confronts the world of the commodity with a contradiction that it must somehow resolve: the same technical infrastructure that is capable of abolishing labor must at the same time preserve labor as a commoditya€”and indeed, as the sole generator of commodities. We could rephrase this by saying that Fordism both requires and paves the way for post-Fordism. At the same time, however, we know that a commodity like an Apple computer is, in fact, produced by processes quite clearly identifiable as a€?labor.a€? Despite the fact that every effort is made to keep this fact out of sight and out of mind, we know it because we read about it on Apple computers.
Composed of aluminum, nickel, steel, glass, vinyl, and fluorescent, the production of Vanitas involves a virtuosic performance of mimetic exactitude. In a dark room, the viewer looks at the object, sees into it, and sees nothing of herself (like a vampire in front of a mirror, Baier says) while the object reflects its own interior infinitely in all directions. The first thing we might note about this piece is its complex engagement with relational aesthetics. Second, we can say that if Vanitas is a captivating work of art, much of what makes it so is money.
Baiera€™s piece instantiates the problem of the relation between materials and money, captured in the art object. Behind Vanitas, a glass reproduction of Baiera€™s eyeball at the center of a projected disc of light, gazing without seeing across the room at a mirrored box which does not reflect its image. Beside Vanitas, a fond de scA?nea€”a reflector used in the background of photo shootsa€”which Baier placed in a template with a circular hole and left in a window for nine months. Around the corner, a piece called Projet A‰toile (Noir), consisting of a graphite painting titled Monochrome (Black) and a sculptural replica of a meteorite recovered from Death Valley. These are photographic pieces and sculptural objects which Baier would have worked on at the computer in the center of Vanitas. At the crux of materials and moneya€”through the complex history that crux containsa€”the subject of Baiera€™s installation is the relation between memory, recording, mimesis.
Baiera€™s problem is not only the remembrance of things past, but, more specifically, the reminiscence of that which has never been sensed, the distribution of the insensible, recalled. By way of a first approach to what I mean by a€?the distribution of the insensible,a€?A  leta€™s recall some basic passages from Volume One of Capital on the transformation of materials. There's something for everyone, whether you like Bill Gates or Richard Stallman, or neither. Bragg's colleagues on the national staff had exchanged phone calls and e-mail messages, angered by comments from Mr. As OSCOM starts, the issues of interop betw content management tools is very hot in the open source world thanks to work by Paul Everitt and Gregor Rothfuss. Using my wingy-dingy new search engine, I found a great reference, a mini-article entitled Oh Lieberman, which should have been entitled Oy Lieberman. Sure the original author may toil at a money-losing labor-of-love long past the point where it has been proven not to be viable, but what about the people he or she is not hiring, the manual writers, testers, more programmers, a sales person, a marketing person perhaps, to work on ease of use and to keep the website current.
So when you hear yourself complaining about software quality, think about how much money the developer of the product has to fully support it. They link to one press release from the Music Indistry (sic) News Network commending the governor for the veto.
BTW, I wasn't thinking Google might have been holding back, I was thinking the newspapers were. Microsoft's developer program was kaput, everyone who was anyone wanted to develop for the Web, and that led them to Netscape and Sun, and away from Microsoft.
Being in a dead software market is no fun, even when you haven't signed on with the dying platform vendor. He's got a Web app that simulates a Gator client, and sends messages back to Gator asking for ads to display on certain sites. Somehow MS has taught its people not to care about issues that are not related to success or failure of products. I've noticed that it colors how I think about them, not in a positive way, and felt I should disclose that, since I write about them here on Scripting News.


It is this dissatisfaction that drives litigators to experts in the field of computer technology like Computer Data Litigation Services, LLC. Our professional staff includes computer forensic experts, Private Investigators, Certified Fraud Examiners and Certified Public Accountants to assist in the attainment and analysis of the data. We can make sure that the nanny you may be considering does not have a criminal past of fencing stolen items, or maybe the personal assistant that has a past littered with embezzlement. Such damage calculations have included patent infringement damages, lost profits analyses, and loss of wages and benefits due to death or injury.
With the advent of the technologically driven society, most all forms of communication are digital. From this evidence, all fraudulent acts can be documented, losses assessed and future losses prevented. And I want to argue that it is the specificity of this problem which allows us to think the relation between the history of capital and the history of mimesis. I could summarize this critique as follows: if RanciA?re were more inclined to focus his attention upon the distribution of the insensible, perhaps he might think more perspicuously not only about the relation between politics and aesthetics, but also the relation between political economy and aesthetics.
Marx analyzes the process of production from two perspectives: the labor process and the valorization process.
Moreover, we transform materials into tools, instruments of labor, with which we transform materials.
The transformation of materials produces objects with use value, but it also produces commodities with exchange value. But insofar as it is specifically capitalist, what the process of production produces is value, and a particular kind of value: surplus value and its reintegration into the production process as capital. The entire empirical reality of facts, events and description by which one moment and locality of time and space is distinguished from another is wiped out.
And this social genesis is at once material and abstract, since the exchange value of a commodity is borne by its use value, and since exchange (like the labor process) is a physical act which also requires abstraction from all physicality. Hence the exchange process presents a physicality of its own, so to speak, endowed with the status of reality which is on a par with the material physicality of the commodities which it excludes. This is what Sohn-Rethel, following Marx, calls a€?the real abstractiona€? of the value form as a social process of exchange. In a materialist inversion of the Kantian transcendental, media technologies constitute the a priori conditions of possibility for the sensible, such that the distribution of the sensible already operates within these conditions. From the industrial revolution to the production and networking of digital information technologies, the history of modern technology emerges from and responds to the demands and internal contradictions of capitalist accumulation. This early period of subsumption is merely a€?formala€? because the production process itself (the labor process which is subsumed) remains primarily pre-capitalist. New technologies of production, and new techniques of production (assembly lines, for example) make it possible to increase productivity, and thus increase the amount of surplus value that can be extracted in a certain period of time. If automation, or for that matter any mechanisms, even less radical ones, that can increase productivity, are to be prevented from reducing socially necessary labor-time to an unacceptably low level, new forms of employment have to be created. Essentially, Society of the Spectacle is a book about the consequences of real subsumption, about the contradictions that it bears within its history and about the new regime of accumulation necessary to defer and compensate for the crises those contradictions contain. A corporation like Foxxcon, the largest manufacturer of electronic components in the world, is something like a distillation of the entire history of the contradiction between capital and labor, the great movements of the industrial revolution, Taylorism, Fordism, the off-shoring of manufacturing labor, and the simultaneity of deindustrialization and post-Fordist cognitive capitalism with the persistence of the most traditional forms of miserable factory work. The main piece is the sculptural object we have been looking at, titled Vanitas, a reproduction of the artista€™s office.
Every component of the artista€™s desk and of his tools is precisely rendered as either a three dimension drawing or a three dimensional scan. It mimics one of the primary gestures of that movement or style, bringing the artista€™s studio and living space into the museum. Obviously it is expensive to reproduce onea€™s office in nickel-plated aluminum and to display it so dramatically. The content of his piece is nothing other than that relation, a reflection upon that relation. Baiera€™s piece should be considered as part of an installation, not merely a sculptural object, insofar as it does, in fact, come into relation with its surroundings, surroundings composed of digitally produced images and objects. In front of Vanitas, a meticulously composed compound photograph of the stone wall beside the earliest cave paintings, titled Canvas. Not a reflection of the sun but an indexical image of its absorption, marked by the circular discoloration of the black tissue. Having held this meteorite in the palm of my hand, three years ago, I can testify to the strangeness of encountering its inexistence, distributed between these two art of objects.
Instantiated as digital code, they were a€?ina€? that computer, stored in its memory banks, transformed on its screen.
At and through the limits of modernity, of capital, of mimesis, of thought, of sensation, and within their outside, his work draws us into that distribution.
To me it was the day I quit smoking, and also the day I checked into the hospital (when I wrote that post I didn't know for sure I'd have to go into the hospital, but I wasn't surprised when I did). In my talk yesterday I said this was a species of software developer with a lot of power, a beast of the 80s, extinct this century.
Before that I told the story of how XML-RPC came to be, and how Eric Raymond liked it so much. By making my position public about the equivalent issues in the weblog world, I will be joining with them in requesting that we put aside our differences (I'm not sure there are any) and establish a set of principles on how we build from here. Financiers invested, and gave back to the university so the next generation of technology entrepreneurs could be educated, nutured and launched." It wasn't clear that financiers invested in the companies started by the students, not in the work done at the universities. He met up with the proprietor of that site at a place in NYC called Alt.Coffee on Avenue A in Manhattan. How about a couple of tech support people (so they can take a vacation once in a while, it's a tough job).
When you buy a new computer you probably pay a few hundred dollars for software, most of it going to Microsoft.
How much self-respect is there in paying nothing for software that leverages so much of your time? So even if you don't want to pay for the time-leverage software delivers, would you pay money to keep your money safe? Is it based on features, or any deep understanding of how the products work, or the economics of the market? Hosting is a tricky business, as we found out, there are ISPs who now host MT sites that must somehow be included in their plans, yet there seems to be no mention of them in the FAQ.
Here's how I like to look at it -- formats and protocols are tools, details; the important thing is functionality delivered to users. Our forensic professionals work quickly to extract critical information and provide the results in an easy to read format.
We believe that a logical, easy to understand presentation greatly facilitates the judge or jury arriving at the desired verdict.
There are so many sources and so much more information available today that this task has become immense. Crucially, I want to show how the relation between those two histories is mediated by another: the history of technology.
That is: focusing on the specific problem of the distribution of the insensible turns out to be the key to thinking about the relation between aesthetics and politics in a materialist way, in a manner properly responsive to the exigencies of Marxist historical materialism. He sets in motion the natural forces which belong to his own body, his arms, legs, head and hands, in order to appropriate the materials of nature in a form adapted to his own needs. For example, according to Sohn-Rethel, the purely formal character of the Kantian forms of intuitiona€”space and timea€”can be understood as genetically related to the abstract formalism of the value form and the exchange relation. Time and space assume thereby that character of absolute historical timelessness and universality which must mark the exchange abstraction as a whole and each of its features.
Thus the negation of the natural and material physicality constitutes the positive reality of the abstract social physicality of the exchange processes from which the network of society is woven.
This real abstraction constitutes a kind of a€?second nature,a€? and Sohn-Rethel argues that this second nature is a€?the arsenal from which intellectual labor through the eras of commodity exchange draws its conceptual resources.a€? We can situate this analysis more broadly at the level of the whole process of valorization, or the accumulation of capital through circulation. We need to supplement Sohn-Rethela€™s materialist critique of epistemology with a history of media technologies like that carried out by Friedrich Kittler. Thus, without further increasing the length of the working day, one can increase surplus value (this called a€?relative surplus valuea€?).
But Marx makes clear that the part of capital invested in constant capital does not undergo any alteration in the process of production, it does not increase (this is why it is called constant). This means that less money is being paid out on the labor market for the consumption of commodities. A happy solution presents itself in the growth of the tertiary or service sector in response to the immense strain on the supply lines of the army responsible for distributing and hyping the commodities of the moment.
And behind the passage I just read, we can also read a commentary on the history of technology. The conditions of possible experience are themselves conditioned by the moving contradiction between capital and labor.
Indeed, bearing the conditions of its production in mind, one might view a device like an Apple computer as a distillation of the entire history of modernitya€”of the manner in which modernity acts upon external nature and changes it, and in this way simultaneously changes its own nature, from the printing press to the steam engine to the silicon chip. Each of these objects is then reproduced, at exact scale, by either machining in aluminum (in the case of objects that were drawn) or stereolithography (in the case of objects that were scanned). But in doing so it forecloses the primary content of that gesture, radically separating this space from that of the viewer, encasing it within a mise-en-abyme in which only images interact with one another.
A tour de force of concept, design, and execution, the piece is also nothing if not resourceful. As he did with the objects reproduced in Vanitas, Baier made a three dimensional scan of the meteorite and then reproduced ita€”at a much larger scalea€”through stereolithography. That's all there is to it, except when you really want to get it you should let just a hint of an R back. Shortly after my reappearance, Seth Dillingham said something really nice and very memorable. Apparently he went over his allotted time, I wanted to ask him to comment on the opportunities for open source projects to integrate with commercial software. I polished my skills as a user, and watched other people learn weblogs, saw what they got, and didn't. Then I hazarded a guess that if Eric had dinner with Bob Atkinson, one of the co-designers of XML-RPC, that they'd agree on a lot, and probably enjoy each others' company, even though Bob is a senior guy at (you guessed it) Microsoft. I've tried to explain the issues in non-technical terms, yet of course as soon as words like APIs and XML appear a lot of ordinary people tune out. Some of them are great writers and have passion for the truth and aren't serving the same masters that the bigtimes at WSJ, NYT and CNN. It's about a 20-minute drive to the office, not as convenient as living in Cambridge, but very sweet. If you pay nothing for software, you probably won't die from it, but you may lose data, you're virtually certain to waste time, and at some point, money. I have data that contradicts theirs, fairly superficial stuff -- why, on investigation didn't they uncover it?
If there are any busdev people I need to talk with at Google, I guess now's the time to do that. Our professionals have extensive experience testifying as expert witnesses before both the federal and state courts. The relation between the history of capital and the history of mimesis is mediated by the history of technics. Through this movement he acts upon external nature and changes it, and in this way his simultaneously changes his own nature.
It is independent because the exchange value of a commodity is entirely determined by the average socially necessary labor time required to produce it, not by the materials of which it is composed. We can view the process of production from two sides, but what it produces are commodities that are sold for money, which is reinvested in the production process and thereby becomes capital. He does not think the distribution of the insensible, the movement of valorization, and thus he misses entirely the dimension of political economy in his thinking of politics. The social process of valorization is the very medium in which we think, and to which thinking is applied through intellectual labor (such as management).


And indeed, Kittlera€™s media-theoretical analysis of discourse networks should also be understood as a materialist critique of Kantian idealism. It communicates with itself, through its own data channels, and consciousness is the epiphenomenon of communication.
Thus, during the period of formal subsumption, the extraction of surplus value is primarily correlated to the length of the working day and the cost of labor power. This is what automation and capitalist management techniquesa€”Taylorism and Fordisma€”are for.
So labor has to be reabsorbed into the labor market to support consumption and prevent overproduction.
The development of industrial automation both necessitates and creates the conditions of possibility for the invention of new media apparatuses, especially digital information technologies and networks. The history of the sensible, the transformations undergone in the media-technological conditions of sensation and experience, is also the history of the insensiblea€”the history of the process of valorization as it develops in relation to contradictions in the labor process. This process includes every electric or electronic plug and cord connecting Baiera€™s computer, his monitors, his speakers, and his scanner. Although it draws the space within which the artist works and thinks into the space of the museum, the artist is pointedly absent. It patently shows off the artista€™s mastery of that form of technA“ so crucial to contemporary art practice: the capacity to get funding.
At his desk, thinking, communicating, representing, the artist enters into the circuits of capital, the movement of valorizationa€”as do we all, one way or another. He then melted the meteorite down and used the graphite of which it was composed to paint the surface of Monochrome (Black).
Also, reading the highway signs I kept seeing Oxford, which I wanted to write as a hex number: oXF08D. And for sure, on May 31, 2002 I had chest pain, and was in denial on how sick I really was. I asked other people for ideas of what made weblogs different from professional pubs and Wikis.
They still are, but after SOAP and XML-RPC they could just as easily be running on a server farm.
And most of them don't have websites, yet, largely because it is too complicated and expensive to have one. And if you pay $10 or $20 to use a piece of software, the software isn't paid for if the software isn't generating enough money to be fully supported or developed.
Why don't a small number of users of the popular weblog tools work together to create an authoritative review of the category and show us how the products compare. It takes better pictures than the Nikon if I actually have it with me when I see something photo-worthy.
Unfortunately I don't have any money to pay them for this, but I'm afraid that's what they're going to want to talk about.
And it is through this history, this mediation, that art takes up techniques which throw us back outside the history of capital, outside the history of mimesisa€”indeed, outside the history of the human, the history of thought, and the history of sensationa€”within and through the technical means to which the linked histories of capital, mimesis, and technics give rise. Labor time is that abstract, universal equivalent which will find its answer in the universal abstraction of the money form, and value is not a material thing but a social relation. Production produces both surplus value and capital, and capital produces expanded cycles of accumulation. One consequence of this failure is that he has no rigorous means of accounting for the relation of his history of art and artistic regimes to the history of capital, to structural changes of the contradiction between capital and labor. Insofar as intellectual labor is subsumed by capital, as is manual labor, the forms of thought themselves enter into a relation of dialectical genesis with the value form.
For Kittler, it is not transcendental categories but media technologies which determine the conditions of any possible experience. The capitalist wants to extend the working day as much as possible, and to reduce wages as much as possible. What Marx calls a€?real subsumptiona€? is this revolutionizing of the production process such that it becomes properly capitalist.
Thus, as relatively more capital is invested in constant capital and relatively less capital is invested in variable capital, relatively less capital is available for conversion into surplus value. The process of real subsumption thus also requires the growth of the tertiary service sector, which produces both a new labor market and new fields of commodity production and consumption.
These not only enable the growth of the tertiary service sector and its forms of communicative labor and consumption, they also themselves produce new markets of goods and services. Shortly after he coined the term a€?immaterial labor,a€? Maurizio Lazzarato renounced it, for the good reason that the term was impossible to reconcile with a materialist position. It includes the crumpled pieces of paper in his trash can and a book lying open beside his keyboard. The piece is something like an anti-humanist negation of relational aesthetics: perfectly finished, enclosed, complete, pristine, it subtracts the participation of the viewer precisely through the viewera€™s gaze, which is drawn into and lost within the reflexive auto-mimesis of the object. The distribution of the insensible: the movement of capital, the structural transformation of the contradiction between capital and labor, the circuitous courses of the process of valorizationa€”all this is how a digital information system ends up inside a mirrored box in the company of fluorescent lighting and minimalist furnishings, installed on the distressed concrete floors of an art gallery. The matter of the object thus remains, and so does its form, but the object itself has disappeared into an uncanny splitting of their formerly integral relation.
Canvas shows us the primordial matter of mimesis: the substrate of inaugural images carved in stone, with stone. You can certainly feel good about giving the money, but you're probably not going to get what you want or think you deserve in the way of support or upgrades for that kind of money. I'm working on a taxonomy of weblogs for the two conferences I'm keynoting in the next two weeks.You can start there if you want but you probably don't need my help. Our experts have followed people all over the United Stated using our state of the art GPS tracking devices. As Marx tells us in Chapter 8 of Volume One, a€?the means of production on one hand, labor-power on the other, are merely the different forms of existence which the value of the original capital assumed when it lost its monetary form and was transformed into the various factors of the production process.a€? Both the means of production and labor power are different elements of capital in its own valorization process. In my opinion, this is a problem substantial enough to render his history of aesthetics more or less irrelevant. For Sohn-Rethel, the Kantian transcendental subject is the representative modern figure of this dialectic (though its status as such is occluded by the idealism of transcendental philosophy). The rate of surplus value extraction depends upon these factors (this is called a€?absolute surplus valuea€?). It is not only that labor is subsumed under the value form, but that the very constitution of labor itself changes. Capital needs to invest more in technology in order to increase productivity and sustain the valorization process.
The new regime of accumulation that accompanies this structural transformation is what Guy Debord theorizes as the Spectacle. And more importantly, they are the technological ground for the massive growth of speculative markets we call a€?financialization,a€? which is predicated (in its contemporary form) upon the exchange of digital information.
He should have referred instead to a€?insensible labor.a€? Information and cognition are not immaterial, but they are insensible. Each of these reproduced objects is then plated in mirrored nickel before being rearranged, in in a reproduction of their configuration, within a parallelepiped encased on all six sides in one-way mirrored glass and illuminated by overhead fluorescent light. His studio is something like the Platonic form of so-called a€?immaterial labora€?a€”designer furniture and designer devices, neatly arrayed with the precision of an architectural firm blessed with a particularly fastidious custodial staff.
This movement, this transformation, this process is what we are looking at, though we cannot see it. That's what I liked the most about Ringo, he needed a little help from his friends, and he appreciated it too. If you have a pain inside your chest where your heart is, go to see a doctor now, don't think you can exercise your way out of the corner. In other words, I did something rather unlike a weblog to try to get to the core of what one is.
And get this -- this isn't just for Radio users, we created an open system that anyone can ping. We have even brought criminals to justice using the GPS devices, video taping and surveillance hand in hand. But we can also recognize, as Catherine Malabou argues in What Should We Do With Our Brain?, that there is a structural homology between post-Fordist management discourse emphasizing non-hierarchical networks, self-organization, flexibility, and innovation, and contemporary neurological theory, which views the brain as a decentralized network of neuronal assemblies and emphasizes neurological plasticity as the ground of cognitive flexibility and adaptation. In the discourse network of 1800, the book is the site of an encounter between reading and writing, wherein the romantic imagination produces a projection of the soul into what Novalis calls a€?a real, visible world,a€? written into and read off of printed signifiers, emerging from the text as synaesthetic phantasmagoria in which all the senses are drawn together by the hallucinatory experience of Literature. Importantly, then, real subsumption requires and depends upon technological innovation: the capitalist process of production both needs and produces new machines because these increase productivity within a given period of time and thus compensate for limits on the length of the working day. But by doing so, it also decreases the amount of capital which can be converted into surplus value. The tech boom and its implosion are the logical and necessary outcome of real subsumption, pushing beyond its limits into the society of the Spectacle.
And the forms of affective labor which precisely are sensed are premised upon the indistinction of labor and leisure, the impossibility of distinguishing them under conditions of post-Fordist accumulation. Star (Black) confronts us with an extra-terrestrial outside, encountered, vanished, recordeda€”at once absent and yet uncannily present as residue and reproduction. The first hit took me to a guy about the right age, living in about the right place, but on further inspection I noted that (gullp) he died.
The concrete process of transforming materials through labor, aided by tools, is subsumed by the abstract process of valorization. In the discourse network of 1900, gramophone, film, and typewriter effect an analytic separation of this sensory synthesis, constituting distinct technologies of recording and transmission for sound, the moving image, and the written word. Thus, due to forces of competition and technological innovation driving increased productivity, the rate of surplus value extraction tends to decline. It is labor itself that becomes insensible under these conditions, dispersed into networks linking neurons and screens and indistinguishable from the most intimate gestures of our affective lives. These are images of the deep time of human and cosmological history, outside the limits of modernity, of capital and its enabling technologies of representation.
Such would be a historical materialist account of conceptual abstraction following from Sohn-Rethela€™s critical of idealist epistemology.
What Kittler calls a€?media differentiationa€? carves up the Romantic imagination, sutured to the book, and parcels out its capacities among discrete technologies addressed to a segmented perceiver: an ear, an eye, a minda€”a modernist collage of the formerly integral subject. Thus, it is only possible to extend the working day so much, or to reduce wages to so little, because the reproduction of capital depends upon the reproduction of labor. What the installation asks us to think, however, is the manner in which it is these technologies of representation which record this outside, which draw our attention to it and make it manifest. Since there's no year on it, it's impossible to know if it's the Mitchell Stern I knew as a kid. The precise transformations of materials it enablesa€”its retentional exactitudea€”precisely negate all transformation. Simply put, the way we thinka€”the form of thinkinga€”is dialectically intertwined with the structure and the historical movement of capitalist accumulation.
Like Malicka€™s The Tree of Life, Baiera€™s meteorite indexes a cosmological time and an inhuman history which never was sensed, which was prior to sensationa€”though, like Malicka€™s film, Baier makes this history manifest through the most sophisticated technological means of representation. The labor of the artist is the transformation of money, through materials, into its own image. Baiera€™s Canvas, a meticulous photographic recording of the bare stone wall beside the first recorded images, situates this indexical effort within the whole history of representationa€”again, carrying us outside the modern technics of mimetic exactitude which make the digital rendering of this stone wall possible in the first place. But this is also to transform them into an art object: neither tool nor raw material, neither instrument nor that to which it is applied. Here I sit 4 hours by car from NY, if I want a good pizza, I have to go there, they don't make it here. Rather, a worked form, presented, apparently useless and withdrawn from exchangea€”though of course it has its uses and cannot help but find its way back to market. Think of all the bandwidth that's wasted by search engines looking for changes on pages that never change.



Stories of saints and miracles
Esther and jerry hicks books youtube
Speech communication course syllabus


Comments

  1. 03.01.2015 at 20:28:14


    Discover how you can start off for your life's perform so that you could.

    Author: kisa
  2. 03.01.2015 at 12:55:49


    Excellent deal of experience by mentoring your power system is a crucial hold on pondering.

    Author: keys
  3. 03.01.2015 at 19:13:41


    Two of the very best ever.

    Author: SeXy_GirL
  4. 03.01.2015 at 23:13:14


    Claim when it has been received target.

    Author: Patriot