The hosting of an event in Oxford each year was one of the conditions of the incredibly generous legacy gift of around £300,000 left to the WEA by Catherine and Fred Adler. A highly enjoyable part of this year’s event came when creative writing tutor Kate Joyce and two of her students Rita and Owen delivered their original, intertwining story of three individuals on the same day in Oxford City Centre each affected by issues of democracy. Emma Carney briefly touched on last year’s Save Adult Education campaign where 11,000 signatures and 500 letters to MPs resulted in a visit to 10 Downing Street and a positive outcome in the face of government cuts. With this year’s event providing further testimony to lives changed and opportunities provided, Fred and Catherine would be proud to know that the WEA are working hard to do justice to their wonderful gift. A local community arts group for adults with learning difficulties has been given the seal of approval from an esteemed panel at the Victoria & Albert Museum.
As part of the celebrations, there will be awards ceremonies taking place later in the year, showcasing achievements of outstanding individuals, tutors, employers and projects in England.
The materials consist of Power Point slides with activities, information, handouts and links to resources online. For the first time in more than 50 years, the government has published a white paper on culture. According to the charity’s 2015 impact research, 81 per cent of all students at the WEA are involved in more cultural activities, which include reading, following their participation in a WEA class - regardless of the subject. British politician and academic Lord David Blunkett delivered the keynote speech at the evening reception. Events such as these serve to reiterate the value of adult education – it is something which we must strive to protect given its life-enhancing and life-changing effect. Gender parity is the theme for this year and individuals and groups are being urged to take action in order to accelerate equality for all. As Christine Lagarde, chief executive of the IMF, said in the 2014 Dimbleby Lecture, women “face discrimination at birth, on the school bench, in the boardroom. Carolyn Fairbairn, director general of the CBI, reminds us that far too few women run FTSE 100 companies and the pipeline of talent gets blocked by men who, more obviously, fit in.
A survey carried out by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development in 2013 ranked England and Northern Ireland 14th for adult literacy and 16th for adult numeracy. According to the charity Go ON UK, nearly a quarter of the adult population lack basic digital skills, a phenomenon that affects women more than men, given time taken out because of childbirth.
Which is why the WEA helps thousands of working people and those in the poorest communities to return to education, whatever their age or income. Leading an organisation was something that I thought was beyond my grasp when growing up in a small Welsh mining town in the 1960s.
My accent wasn’t right and the first time I was invited out for dinner I turned up at midday. Working in such a male dominated industry in the 1970s was no picnic and, despite coal being in my blood, career opportunities were non-existent for women.
The majority of our students are women and many of them use courses as a means to reskill or retrain. The importance of this was recently confirmed by the Centre for the Modern Family, a think-tank established by Scottish Widows. Globalisation has the potential to open up opportunities and to encourage wider participation – and global organisations need seriously to address widening and deepening the talent pool if they want to continue to be successful. Governments need to take tough action where human values of respect and dignity are compromised and we need to tackle head-on the biggest temptation of them all: to set our sights too low and quit the field when the battle is not yet won. Almost one in four UK workers are willing to take a pay cut in exchange for more flexible working hours as pressure builds on employers struggling to live up to employees’ expectations.
Whilst the study of 2,000 adults and 500 businesses found that almost a third (32%) of employees with children felt their employer provided equal support for all, only 20% without children agreed, and a similar proportion (21%) of those without children claimed that parents received better support.
The findings showed employers’ responses reflected this perception, with more than half (51%) offering flexibility for mothers with young children. Whilst businesses appear to be taking steps towards meeting the needs of parents in the workplace, varying barriers still exist when it comes to extending those policies to support employees more widely. The study found that medium-sized businesses struggle the most – with almost a quarter (23%) saying they do what is legally required of them in terms of flexibility for families, but not any more than this for other employees.
Almost three quarters of medium-sized businesses (72%) would never consider offering full-time working from home, compared to half (51%) of micro and two-fifths (40%) of enterprise businesses.
Half of medium businesses also said they would not consider offering part-time working from home, compared with 16% of enterprise and 22% of large businesses for the same reasons. Almost a fifth of businesses (17%) have called for clearer information around the business benefits of flexible working – rising to a quarter (24%) in large businesses. However, employees feel it is the employer’s responsibility to offer solutions, and many are keen to see changes in the workplace. Join us for the WEA biennial conference, which will be held on 11th and 12th March 2016 in Sheffield.
If your costs are being met by a WEA Region or Association Services, you can register online here.
Ed Mayo is Secretary General of Co-operatives UK, the national business association for co-operative and mutual enterprises. Debate the future of Conference and the sutainability of the WEA - the latest agenda is available here. Current WEA Deputy President, Lynne Smith, is set to become President of the Association following an all member vote. Ruth Spellman, Chief Executive and General Secretary commented: "I am sure that members, staff, volunteers and supporters of the WEA will join with me in congratulating Lynne Smith on her election as President of the WEA. Wessex Archaeology and the Workers’ Educational Association have forged a new partnership to promote and deliver educational outreach with heritage at its heart.
Wessex Archaeology Chief Executive Chris Brayne and Ruth Spellman, Chief Executive of the WEA, will be signing a memorandum of understanding at the Omega Centre in Portsmouth today.
Lord Mayor of Portsmouth, Councillor Frank Jonas is attending to speak about the Mary Rose and WEA students will be there to help show that heritage themes can support the teaching of Stem (science, technology, engineering and maths) subjects and literacy. Yesterday, Liberal Democrat peer Baroness Sharp led a debate in the House of Lords on the role of adult education and lifelong learning in strengthening the UK economy. Speaking at the debate, Lord Watson of Invergowrie, noted the results of the WEA’s latest impact report which assessed the effect of our provision against our four curriculum themes. Lord Hennessy of Nympsfield, Lord Hunt of Chesterton, Lord Shipley and Baroness Garden of Frognal all referenced the charity and its role in ensuring that everyone has a chance to return to education. The WEA is pleased to see this issue raised in parliament, and through the work of the APPG, will continue to champion the importance of lifelong learning to individuals, communities and wider society.
The UK Commission for Employment and Skills (UKCES) has published its 2015 Employer Skills Survey which reports that, despite a surge in job openings, the number of positions left vacant because employers cannot find people with the skills or knowledge to fill them has risen by 130% since 2011. In our experience, ESOL students are hardworking and diligent, committed to contributing to their communities and wider society.
Election for the post of PresidentSince two nominations have been received for the post of President, a ballot among WEA members will now decide which candidate will be elected to the post.
If you were a registered member by 12 September 2015, you will be able to vote in the election. Elections of WEA Association Officers are supervised by the Standing Orders Committee appointed at the previous Association Conference. In order to be able to vote, members are required to have joined the WEA in England and Scotland on or before 12 September 2015. WEA London Region is looking for experienced, knowledgeable, flexible and creative adult educators for inclusion on our Tutor Panel.
You should ideally have experience of working with educationally or socio-economically disadvantaged adults across a range of community settings.
The report demonstrates that adult learning has an enormous impact on individuals and communities. The Autumn edition of WEA News is now available, including stories on our Save Adult Education campaign, Conference 16, the new All Party Parliamentary Group for Adult Education and much more.
Molly Morgan was a WEA volunteer who was tragically murdered on her way to a WEA course in 2009. As the WEA leads the campaign to save adult education across England, colleagues in WEA Scotland give their support and solidarity, whilst reflecting on some key differences in Scotland. An award winning adult education student and a fashion tutor from Tower Hamlets joined shadow minister and Newcastle MP, Chi Onwurah, to deliver a petition of over 10,000 names to 10 Downing Street as part of a campaign to save adult education. Adult education, which is funded by the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills, represents only six per cent of the department’s spending devoted to education and training. With the government expecting that 13.5 million jobs will be created over the next 10 years but only 7 million young people coming into the workforce, there is a concern the loss of adult education services will mean that older workers will not be able to update their skills while employers will face a shortage of workers. On Thursday, 29 October 2015, the Higher Education Policy Institute (HEPI) published It’s the finance, stupid! This collection of essays explains the catastrophic fall in part-time student numbers, which is harming the economy and limiting people’s ability to transform their lives, and proposes a range of options for tackling the problem. A study, published in the Royal Society’s Open Science journal, looked at how a series of adult education classes grew closer over seven months.
Dr Eiluned Pearce, from Oxford’s Department of Experimental Psychology led the research. To test the theory, the researchers worked with charity the Workers' Educational Association (WEA), the UK’s largest voluntary sector provider of adult education.
Those attending the classes were given surveys before and after individual sessions in the first month, just before the break and at the end of the seven month course.
We are sad to announce the recent death of Peter Quigley, who played an active role in the WEA for many years.
I learned Peter Quigley had passed away on the evening of Tuesday 13th October in hospital following an operation, whilst I was attending a WEA Regional Heads Meeting in London.
Peter had also represented WEA Scotland nationally on the WEA Council and more recently on the Standing Orders Committee. On the wider stage of life, Peter was a former English teacher, and Union Representative and this often meant that he was called on to represent members in disciplinary procedures. Knowing of my literary aspirations, Peter had chatted to me a couple of times about writing a book himself, though, ever cautious, he never revealed the plot. A forthright individual, Peter always challenged what he did not agree, but with a good heart and there are few who would not say that he sought to improve the WEA and its place in the world.
WEA Scotland would wish to extend to Peter’s family and friends our sincere condolences. Please consider for a few moments Peter Quigley’s contribution to our lives and the life and success of the WEA.
Labour MP Holly Lynch has voiced support for the WEA's Save Adult Education campaign after meeting with our students and tutors last week.
The Halifax MP, part of the 2015 intake, was invited to a screening of a campaign video produced by learners which captures the many reasons why adult education should be protected and supported.
Commenting on the campaign, Holly said: "Adult education is essential in ensuring that people have the skills and the confidence to make the most of the opportunities available to them, either in employment or in life. New WEA tutor Tracey Kettridge is interviewed in this month’s Prima magazine in a feature on inspirational women.
In September, Tracey fulfilled another of her ambitions – to become a tutor with the WEA.
Organisations from the education, business and employment sectors have joined forces to shine a spotlight on the hundreds of thousands of students studying part-time around the UK. The two largest providers of part-time higher education: The Open University and Birkbeck, University of London. Unionlearn – the learning and skills organisation of the TUC who last year who have helped over 220,000 people access training and development.
Workers' Educational Association (WEA) – the UK's largest voluntary sector provider of adult education.
National Institute of Adult Continuing Education (NIACE) – the national voice for lifelong learning.
National Union of Students (NUS), which represents the voices on 7 million students including part-time and mature students.
CBI, whose 190,000 members employ nearly 7 million people, about one third of the private sector-employed workforce. With more than two million students currently settling into new university courses, a fifth of these will be studying part-time whilst juggling work and family responsibilities. These part-time students are largely 'invisible' – they may not identify themselves as being a student, and are often overlooked in media and government reports in favour of reporting on the participation of younger, full-time students. The Government is currently preparing its Spending Review for the next 5 years and will announce its plans on November 25. Less than 6 per cent of Government spending on education and training is devoted to adult further education and skills. Putting this in context, over the next 10 years there will be 13.5 million more jobs but only 7 million young people coming into the workforce. Over the next few weeks we are hoping to reach thousands of students, members and supporters of the WEA as well as a vast range of partners and friends who share our concerns. I am deeply concerned that the cuts suggested for the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) will have a serious impact on the sustainability of adult education across England. As a supporter of the Workers’ Educational Association (WEA), I have experienced the impact adult education can make.
Please add in a personal statement of what the WEA means to you whether as a student volunteer or tutor.
The group has been formed to raise the profile of adult education, and in particular, the vital role it plays in providing high-quality educational provision to the most disadvantaged members of society.
The group will be established as an All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) shortly after the launch. The launch event will be at 11am on Friday 18 September at Westgate Community College in Newcastle. Created as part of the Further and Higher Education Act 1992, the SDIs offer a vast range of adult education courses for over 130,000 students across Britain each year, providing educational opportunities for every community in the country.
Yahoo , Facebook , Facebook , Twitter , Twitter , Google+ , Google+ , Myspace , Myspace , Linkedin , Linkedin , Odnoklassniki , Odnoklassniki , Vkontakte , Vkontakte , Google , Google , Yahoo , Yahoo , Rambler , Rambler , Yandex , Yandex , Gmail , Gmail , Yahoo! Designers Manufacturers , ??????? ????????? - ?????????? ???????????? , Gorgian Wikipedia - Free Encyclopedia , ????????? ?????? ????????? , Cambridje Dictionary Online , ????????? ???????? ????????? ?????? ????????? , Oxford Advenced Learner's Online Dictionar? , ??????????? ?????? - moazrovne,net, ??? As devoted socialists, trade union activists and supporters of adult education, the Adlers were passionate advocates of the transformative power of education. With focus on Preparing For Work and Helping in School courses, WEA tutors Heather Dommet and Vivian Vermede introduced students Lubna and Shamena who addressed the audience with stories of how the WEA has helped them to integrate, gain confidence and find employment and volunteer opportunities. He also touched on the Emergency Powers Act prior to World War Two and the more recent terrorism acts which, in attempting to make the population secure, unavoidably restrict civil liberties. We then heard about the two inspiring mosaic projects with students of diverse age, ability and background working together to produce two pieces currently on display at The Barn in Greater Leys and Littlemore Community Centre. Of the students taking part, 22 per cent were from black or ethnic minority backgrounds and 41 per cent had a disability.


In addition, the study found that 36 per cent of all students valued the arts, music or literature more than they had previously whilst 35 per cent had a greater understanding of other cultures.
Tutors, students, members, volunteers and colleagues from across the country were in attendance, with vigorous discussion around sustainability (the theme of the 2016 conference) and the future of the charity.
He has been instrumental in developing a wide range of renewable energy systems and is now leading on the ground-breaking Zero Carbon Britain research.
Speaking from personal experience, Lord Blunkett told the audience of the challenges he faced when returning to education and of the ultimate gain. I was privileged to hear from a variety of wonderful speakers and educational practitioners and felt honoured to share the success stories of the WEA Awards recipients.
Women’s lives have been transformed by technology, changes in our economy and in social attitudes so that women expect to compete on equal terms.
The adult education charity has been going for more than a century and it is as badly needed today as it was in 1903. This low level of adult skills inevitably impacts on the success of the economy as a whole.
People like my grandfather, who left school at 11 but who enrolled on a WEA course and eventually won a trade union scholarship to Ruskin College, Oxford, and another to Peterhouse at Cambridge. When I read economics at Cambridge I was intimidated by the cutglass accents and the seemingly easy social confidence of my fellow students.
It is a vicious cycle that affects many women, which is why we have to do more to support mothers in the workplace. Last year, the WEA launched a campaign focusing on the importance of education and lifelong learning, to enable women to overcome the disadvantages they face in society. Its latest report, published last week, revealed that one in four UK workers would sacrifice pay for greater flexibility. According to the World Economic Forum it is now ranked 18th out of 145 countries in terms of the gender gap, an improvement from the 26th place ranking it achieved last year.
According to the report no country in the world has achieved gender equality but I think there are lessons we can learn from those at the top of the league table: Iceland, Finland, Norway and Sweden. According to the World Economic Forum, it will take another 117 years until the pay gap between men and women is closed. We also need to recognise and reward good practice wherever we see it, learn from our own experience and the experience of other countries and cultures.
However, far fewer are supportive of fathers with young children (35%), older workers (26%) and other employees (34%) who may have additional responsibilities such as elderly or unwell relatives to care for, charity and volunteering responsibilities, or a desire to attend additional training or classes outside of work. Over half (52%) of medium-sized employers said this would be logistically too difficult to implement, whilst over a third (35%) worry it would impact negatively on the business. Almost a third of employers (31%) place the onus on employees – saying they would be encouraged to reconsider their decisions if employees would consider taking cuts in return for more flexible working hours.
A quarter (24%) of employees think employers should offer flexible shift patterns, and almost a quarter (23%) would be willing to be paid less in return for working fewer hours if this were an option. Our economy depends on a skilled and motivated workforce that functions productively – and our best hope of achieving this is through encouraging employers to adapt to the evolving needs of the workforce. This year the theme of the conference is sustainability, with an event on the Friday of national significance with a great line up of speakers and workshops along with the Association Dinner. He has a track record of innovation and impact in his work to bring together economic life and social justice. He chaired the Jubilee 2000 campaign and was part of the team that founded the Fairtrade Mark. Standing Orders Committee has therefore confirmed that Lindsay Pearson is duly elected to the post of Deputy President. It encourages intellectual curiosity and lifelong opportunities to learn which we are passionate about in the WEA. Since 2010, we have witnessed a drastic reduction in the ESOL budget of almost 50 per cent. By creating a more cohesive ESOL strategy, the Government could help thousands of people across the country unlock their potential and contribute to the economy. Standing Orders Committee therefore confirms that Lindsay Pearson is duly elected to the post of Deputy President.
Before voting you should read the supporting statements from the cadidates and the role description for the post of President below.
You will have either recieved an email from Electoral Reform Services or a ballot paper by post providing security details for the election. Further information about the regulations of governance of the WEA can be found in our Governing Document.
Applicants should hold a First Degree or equivalent in their subject(s) or have significant, demonstrable professional knowledge and skills. Our work transforms outcomes for people in deprived communities; it reduces social exclusion, increases social mobility and enables families to break the cycle of deprivation. Without continuous opportunities to learn throughout our lives, the economic potential of many citizens will be lost and our productivity levels will continue to lag behind other competing countries. While this is welcome, we believe there needs to be more investment in adult learning alongside a rebalancing of our education and skills policies to reflect the fact that productivity improvements will be driven by those who are already in the labour market. From now on, everyone is going to be thinking about how to continuously increase skills through life. During her life, she gave so much of her time to the charity and had volunteered with us for over 25 years before her death at the age of 81. The formation of a Scottish Parliament Cross Party Working Group on Adult Learning has backed this up - testament to the shared belief that adult learning benefits people and communities throughout Scotland.
An effective vehicle for economic and social justice, a strong adult learning sector is key to the future of Scotland.
Chief Executive of the WEA, Ruth Spellman and WEA Director of Education Joanna Cain, joined the group to highlight the importance of adult education to communities throughout England.
This year alone, the Adult Skills Budget has already had cuts of 24 per cent and 3.9 per cent, and many students are concerned that further cuts will have a devastating impact on a service which provides skills, confidence and support to disadvantaged communities across the country. Adult education is important because it helps individuals and their families break cycles of deprivation and forge better lives themselves. Thousands of people have joined the WEA in saying this is a vital service for our economy and our society. There are other challenges too, such as the future of the research environment, how to assess the quality of teaching and dealing with the effects of marketisation.
Part-time numbers have fallen more in England than other parts of the UK with lower (or no) fees, but it is not the sole cause. Now, research from the University of Oxford has shown that singing is a great ice-breaker and can get groups of people to bond together faster. The conclusion – singing groups bonded quicker than those taking part in other classes.
At the end of the seven months, all the classes were reporting similar levels of closeness.
Indeed he represented my Cousin, Bill Bald and successfully defended him in a case of wrongful dismissal. It is for this and the many other unrealised potentials that we always regret the passing of a life, the achievements stand as testament, the intentions and possibilities as feasible conjecture.
Tracey is a former beautician who, five years ago, decided to change career and study counselling and hypnotherapy after years of being a shoulder to cry on for family, friends and clients. She will be empowering those with low self-esteem to recognise their worth and talents by teaching a confidence course with us.
The sector is calling for greater recognition of the value of part-time education and is asking students, past and present, to share why they love part time study. The Department for Business Innovation and Skills, which funds the WEA and other adult learning institutions like ourselves in England, has been asked by the Chancellor to suggest cuts of 25% and 40%.
Further cuts, on top of the 24 per cent and 3.9 per cent cuts to the Adult Skills Budget already announced this year, will have a devastating impact on a service that is life-changing for many people. At the same time employer investment in skills and training has declined by 2.5bn since 2011. Our aim is to raise awareness, make the case for adult education and to give adult learners a voice. Individual letters or emails to your local MP and the Chancellor will make a difference and make sure that adults are not forgotten when cuts are being made. Please click here to download a template of what you might consider writing - the suggested text is also below.
Further cuts, on top of the 24 per cent and 3.9 per cent cuts to the Adult Skills Budget already announced this year, will have a devastating impact on a service that is life-changing for many people and communities across the country. The group will aim to start a wider debate about the future of adult education in this country. Learning can change people’s lives and improve not just their skills and job prospects but also their confidence and health. APPGs have members from all the main political parties in Parliament and the Adult Education APPG will be supported by the WEA and other specialist adult education institutions. Our aim is to engage key stakeholders, organisations within the FE sector, parliamentarians and other major influencers in a debate about the future of adult education.
The day concluded with two students, Ali from Afghanistan and Aziz from Iraq, telling their stories of how they partook in WEA Community Interpreting Courses to help others like themselves to integrate and find success. Half of the students were on means-tested benefits and 28 per cent from disadvantaged postcodes. If he had not secured his O-level qualifications by attending evening classes, he would not have been able to attend university and subsequently forge a career in national politics.
Award-winning journalist Nadine Dereza hosted the event, which highlighted the fantastic work of the students, tutors and staff that make the WEA special.
After my third was born I had to deal with redundancy and the serious illness of my husband. On Saturday, the formal business of the conference will take place with debates on some of the key issues affecting the WEA and adult education. It was entitled Changing Lives and revealed the extent to which adult learning impacts on so many areas of an individual’s life. In order to help people fully integrate into their communities and boost active citizenship, we believe more should be done to encourage and facilitate English language learning for those who need it. An effective ESOL programme has the potential to promote community cohesion, fair access to services, social mobility and can enable students to access the labour market. Applicants should also hold a Level 4 teaching qualification (minimum) or be willing to work towards this.
Unless we have accessible and affordable education and skills provision economic growth will stall, our productivity levels will continue to be below the G7 average, and five million adults will continue to struggle without basic literacy and numeracy skills. Alongside the petition, hundreds of WEA students who have benefited from adult education have been writing to their MPs to protest against potential cuts in the Spending Review. Singing is found in all human societies and can be performed to some extent by the vast majority of people. Each course, made up of two-hour sessions, was run over seven months with a two-week break in the middle. It was a difficult feat considering that she had four children (her youngest at the time was one years old) and it meant leaving behind the security of a profession which she was thriving in. Please help us maintain this vital service for generations to come by highlighting the importance of adult education to the Chancellor and BIS over the coming months.
This year’s theme: “Cotton Sacks and Freedom Quilt Narratives” substantiates the viability of the sweat equity investment made through labor and cultural contributions by Cotton Pickers and other Plantation Workers. That survey found that more than half of those aged under 60 gave improving communication skills as a specific skill developed on a WEA course. Whilst we can’t guarantee tutors work, inclusion on our Tutor Panel ensures that you will be considered when suitable courses arise. Any solution is likely to rest upon innovative delivery methods and other ways of improving access as much as relying on tweaks to the entitlement for financial support. The following evening, Friday November 13, the “Cotton Pickers Ball” shall be held at 7:00pm, in da’ House of Khafre, located at 300 Main Street, Indianola. All are encouraged to attend both events in costume attire worn in the cotton fields, such as “overalls and straw hats, etc.”The 1st Annual Historical Narrative Competition enhances this year’s Symposium. Mississippi Delta high school seniors and MVSU students will compete for a trophy and gift card provided by Khafre, Inc and Lost Pizza, Company.
All projects must be delivered to the MVSU Social Sciences office “T” by 5:00pm November 5th, (or call organizers to arrange for pick up). Professor, Public Policy, MVSU; Dr Alpha Diarra, National Cotton Spokesman of Mali, West Africa. Local storyteller Helen Sims will pay tribute to “the Spirit of Mama Lula.” Hollandale folk artist Dorothy Hoskins will showcase recent multi-media work on Cotton Pickin’ and Sharecropping in the American South. The University is driven by its commitment to excellence in teaching, learning, service, and research--a commitment resulting in a learner-centered environment that prepares critical thinkers, exceptional communicators, and service-oriented, engaged, and productive citizens. MVSU is fundamentally committed to positively affecting the quality of life and creating extraordinary educational opportunities for the Mississippi Delta and beyond. KHAFRE, Inc.
Honoring the legacy of  “grandmamma-nem” in a university setting gives artistic and academic license to the pursuit of gaining more scholarship and international acceptance, of the contributions and sweat equity made by the people who picked cotton throughout the American South,” said Professor C.Sade Turnipseed, Executive Director of Khafre, Inc.
As part of Khafre, Inc’s historic preservation efforts, a permanent marker will be placed on the MVSU campus in honor of cotton pickers from the Mississippi Delta, and those who worked the repurposed cotton plantation for higher learning, MVSU.The Symposium is free admission.
Khafre, Inc is all about building monumental programs that allow reflection, reconnection, and renewal. This year’s theme: “Cotton Sacks and Freedom Quilt Narratives” will stimulate a day of discussion about historic preservation, leading-edge research, innovative practices, and foundational values. The agency and resistance of these narratives will also reflect on the subtle and continuing impact of cotton on life in the Delta and throughout the South. The one-day event concludes with a good old fashion “black-tie” (or period-piece costume) “Cotton-Pickers’ Ball and Ancestral Celebration” at da’ House of Khafre located at 300 Main St. Julianne Malveaux; and, introduction by award-winning poet Chinaka Hodge the volume offers a balanced view of what our children face day-to-day, on the streets of America.
Over two hundred years ago, the Akan Nation (West Africa) established the Adinkra Symbols to visually communicate a system of living for African people to observe and learn.
Amazingly, just as with other inspired and spiritual writings, drawings, etc., the symbols are beautiful design concepts with meanings still relevant today. They bring clarity and resolve to the question, “What do we (the village) have to do to show support and love for each other and ultimately save ourselves and one another?” The experiences of today’s youth culture demonstrate a fundamental disconnect, to most people of previous generations. The young writers selected for this publication masterfully describe the challenge in dealing with today’s world. Because, it offers tribute to the “original” mother and her instinctual knowing of the spiritual paths that her children (all children) must take to find their way out of harm's way. Revealed, in this collection of writings are a wonderful array of short stories, poems and proverbs that present a familial insight born by the great liberator of liberators, Harriet Tubman!


By Writers of the 21st Century is an affiliate of Young Publishers Network (YPN) and Khafre, Inc a 501(c)(3) organization working in the Mississippi Delta to improve the welfare and healthy living environments of children in America and around the world.### Thank You Mr.
Born in a cabin on a cotton plantation outside Berclair, Mississippi in 1925, his entire life, much like the lives of so many others from the Mississippi Delta, was spent in service to others.
Unfortunately, for most of his contemporaries (colleagues, family of friends) they never received the accolades, appreciation, or respect for their life-long work as cotton-pickers in the American South. David Matthews, MS Congressman Bennie Thompson, MS Senator Thad Cochran, National Parks Director Dr Jon Jarvis, Mr. Theodore Turnipseed, Sr., and millions of others understand the importance of sharing, and erecting a statue and National Park dedicated to the countless field workers of the American South.
Though unrecognized and unappreciated, these people worked from sun up to sun down tilling, planting, chopping, picking and spinning cotton, in the blazing hot sun … This and many other horrifying conditions of the historic Mississippi Delta evoked the music we call “the Blues.”On May 21, 2014, during the last year of his life Mr.
King accepted our call to become the “Honorary Chair” of Khafre, Inc, a Mississippi-based 501(3) not-for-profit organization.
Maya Angelou as the Honorary Chair of the Cotton Pickers of America and the Sharecroppers Interpretive Center project. The plan is to build a thirty-foot high monument on twenty acres of cotton land along Highway 61, just outside the historic Black town Mound Bayou, MS.
This is a historically rare opportunity to transform many lives in the Delta and engage conversations about race and social inequities in America.
Sade Turnipseed is the Executive Director of Khafre, Inc and teaches American History at Mississippi Valley State University, in Itta Bena, the birthplace of Mr.
This year’s theme: “Cotton Sacks and Freedom Quilts Narratives” will stimulate a day of discussion about historic preservation, leading-edge research, innovative practices, and foundational values. No one has ever “officially” said “thank you” to the people in the American South, who literally tilled the way to the economic greatness for many countries and regions around the world. Somewhere along the way the respect and honor for their hard-earned sweat-equity investment in the wealth of others was lost and buried in the bloodstained, tear-soaked soils of the American South. Something “monumental,” needs to happen…like a National Park named the “Cotton Pickers of America Monument and Sharecroppers Interpretive Center” along the Blues Highway 61.
Once the Monument is installed, the organizers’ plan is to turn it over to the federal government for the protection and honor that only this country can provide.
It shall serve as a permanent reminder and ever-present sign of respect for those whose hope for a brighter day wore thin, while working from kin to kain’t (can’t see in the morning to can’t see at night).The world must be reminded of the work ethic held by the people in the South…in most instances it was an honorable legacy … the tragedy is they were never properly compensated, nor thanked. King, (aka: The King of the Blues) will join the effort to build a National Monument in the Mississippi Delta.
King understands, as do all members of the Khafre, Inc family, that a healing will come through recognition and a true recounting of the history of cotton and its impact in the South.In September, 2009, Khafre, Inc, based in Indianola, Mississippi, embarked upon a journey designed to thank the sons and daughters of the South who helped, albeit it without accolades, fanfare, or even recognition, build the cotton empire that fueled the American economy for nearly two centuries.
The impetus for the project: Cotton Pickers of America and Sharecroppers Interpretative Center (hereafter referred to as the Cotton Pickers Monument Complex) is the need to thank those who toiled in the Delta soil for generations without the pay, appreciation, or the dignity they deserved. The Cotton Pickers Monument Complex would not only help heal wounds that have festered for decades, but would also help to empower the generations of family members who have been negatively impacted by this unfortunate era in American history. This is truly a historic endeavor that has the rare opportunity of actually transforming lives, communities, and the conversations about race in America and throughout the world.           These deeply held convictions of education and empowerment are keys to improving the quality of life for all within the Delta. They have helped to catapult Khafre into numerous projects, which are all connected to the vision and mission of this value-driven and movement-oriented organization that is designed to provide historical, health related, and cultural education and outreach to the communities of the Mississippi Delta. Khafre has already helped young people successfully publish literature, prepare for careers in the television and radio broadcast industry, produce staged events and engage in healthy behaviors through diet and exercise, all with the assistance of grant dollars and strategic partnerships.The crowning work of Khafre remains the Cotton Pickers Monument Complex, a dream, which is coming closer to fruition, day by day, because of the unprecedented support of Mr. We have also received Congressional acknowledgment and endorsement from United States Congressmen, Bennie Thompson and Danny Davis, official endorsements from United States Senators, Thad Cochran and Roger Wicker, and expressed support from Dr John Jarvis, National Parks Director. Carroll Van West and Rebecca Conard from Middle Tennessee State University’s History Department, along with the ongoing partnership with Mississippi Valley State University, has proven a significant benefit to our overall project. We are now ready to raise the $26 million dollars to make the Cotton Pickers Monument complex a reality. We look forward to hearing from you and to welcoming your partnership in the building of this long overdue and much needed monument.It is time!Most sincerely,C. The goal is to obtain as much first-hand information as possible relating to the development of America’s Cotton Kingdom (aka the Delta).In the aftermaths of completing the academic study for a Doctorate in Public History at Middle Tennessee State University (MTSU), Professor C. Turnipseed’s theory that perceptions of sharecropping, tenant farming, etc, will be altered in ways that are beneficial to the legacy of the American South when the memory of elders are shared.
The monument site is envisioned to become a National Park; and thereby “the place” for memory and community sharing in the Mississippi Delta, for educational, economic development, and international tourism purposes. King and former honorary chair Dr Maya Angelou who are determined to improve the legacy and social-economic status of Mississippi Delta residents.
The purpose of the organization is to provide educational, lifestyle and cultural programs, build monuments and memorials to honor, celebrate, and recognize the rich and complex history of the Mississippi Delta and to positively impact the quality of life of those living in the Delta, especially the disproportionately poor African American community. There is no documented official acknowledgment of the people who tilled the path to America’s greatness.
Somewhere along the way buried in the tear-soaked soils of the American South, the respect and honor for their hard-earned investment was lost. The Cotton Pickers of America Monument, Sharecroppers Interpretive Center, and Cotton Kingdom Trail make the case for building a National Park that offers a small token of appreciation for their tireless uncompensated work. Sade Turnipseed is the founder of Khafre, Inc., which has developed the Cotton Pickers of America Monument, the Sharecroppers Interpretive Center, and the Cotton Kingdom Historical Trail, among many other projects.
King Museum and Delta Interpretive Center in Indianola and the former cultural arts director for the Mississippi Action for Community Education--MACE (producers of the MS Delta Blues and Heritage Festival) in Greenville.
Turnipseed is the recipient of several community service and arts advocacy awards, and she was an independent candidate for mayor of the city of Indianola in 2013. For the past eight years Turnipseed was the host of “Delta Renaissance,” a cultural arts talk show focusing on the arts, education, and political issues in the Mississippi Delta. Winter Building Wednesday, June 18: Former Secretary of State Dick Molpus talks about his experience during the Philadelphia civil rights murders of 1964. Wednesday, July 2: Filmmaker Wilma Mosley-Clopton will show and discuss her new film, "Did Johnny Come Marching Home?" about people of African descent who fought to free themselves in the Civil War. Wednesday, September 25: Author Robert Blade will talk about his book, "Tupelo Man," a biography of George McLean.
I whole-heartedly agree with the editor that the African American community has proven to the world an uncanny, though unreciprocated, ability to be forgiving of past deeds of injustice, brutality and cruelty at the voting polls, and socially in their community service groups, churches and everyday lives. This point should not be lost on the fact that many of those injustices happened here, in Indianola, Mississippi, to some amazingly strong and resilient individuals like Fannie Lou Hamer and all those who came before her.
But, I can’t help but wonder why the White community isn’t reciprocating and showing the same confidence and trust in racial relations?As Smith indicates, the incumbent received “between 32 and 37% of the votes in the three wards with large Black majorities, despite going up against two black opponents, with strong followings. That’s impressive for a white candidate in a city and region with a history of racially divided politics.” I agree. When we examine the voter polls in the wards that are predominately African American, reflected is a general evenness for all candidates, be they Black or White.
The same, however, cannot be said about the two wards that reflect the primarily White community.
I submit to you the following:In wards I, and II, which are the two wards with the largest white population of voters, we see results that reflect an uncompromising resistance to acceptance and change.
With an overall total of 952 votes cast: 732 went to the White candidate and 220 for the two Blacks, combined)…check that! Surely, it cannot be left up to one segment of the community, and not the other.I truly wish Smith had stressed this very critical point, instead of throwing shade on the outcome of a campaign I have yet to wage. And for the record, as a citizen, it is my right to be afforded the opportunity to run a fair and unbiased race for mayor, without subtle suggestions that it is a waste of my time, as inferred in his editorial.
But, then again maybe he knows more than I about how citizens of wards I and II will ultimately vote. And to also trust that the leaders of this community will look out for their best interest, politically, economically and socially.
After all we live in a community that is 84% African American with a poverty rate that is fast approaching 40% and a public school system that is in deplorable condition, both physically and academically, even under the watchful eye of the government, yet there is no outrage…from either the White side, or the Black side of town. And, I have never believed it was necessary to wait until political season to demonstrate my commitment to the people in my community. If, by chance I am truly embraced by all members of all wards of this city, I believe people will witness an amazing transformation in a relatively short period of time.
It’s “almost” like magic…I predict things will begin to unfold in a substantive way like the neighborhoods will brighten, crime decreases and the impoverished mindset disappears. And I am passionate enough to find the tools to help remedy the concerns that create stagnation and distrust. Please remember, we are a people who come from a very long tradition of women who made a way out of no way.My overall ambition and hope for this city is to develop a strategic plan that enables a steady stream of culturally enriched projects that insures economic development for the future growth and safety in this city. So programs that not only engage everyone, but present real opportunities for career enhancements and social activities are critical. King Museum that I visualized and administered) Thanks Carver Randle, Sr for that wonderful quote.
I just wish he read my bio, or googled me, before publishing doubts about my abilities for success. For the past three years, I have been sitting relatively quietly completing the doctorate in history. Now, I am ready to shake up this town with some bold ideas and ever increasing standards for excellence.
I look forward to being a significant force in this community, by helping the White community too recognize the benefits of building relationships that they can trust in leadership positions.
We MUST work together to improve our community—by encouraging EVERYONE to clean on our streets, bayou, parks, etc. We have some huge unmet challenges here in Indianola, and how YOU decide to vote On December 10, 2013, is vital to our success.
Also, please be sure to come to this year's event in your overalls, or cotton pickin' clothes.
The event is the impetus that gave rise to the “Remigration Home from Chicago to Mississippi” cultural movement organized by music promoters Gus Redmond and Robert Terrell. Legendary blues and gospel performers Otis Clay, Syl Johnson and Marshal Thompson (founder and lead singer of the ChiLites); along with promoter Gus Redmond will lead the way back home to Mississippi in an effort to support the Cotton Pickers of America Monument and Sharecroppers Interpretive Center project in the historical Cotton Kingdom AKA the Mississippi Delta. Though the Ball is a “Black Tie Affair” Overalls or other “cotton pickin” attire are encouraged and expected.“I am so pleased that we have partnered with Khafre to host an event of this magnitude,” said Dr. The discussions and historical presentations will reflect cutting-edge research, innovative practices and foundational values. Additionally, two noted scholars from Mali’s Cotton Manufacturing and Distribution will present via Skype.MVSU participants in the program include Dr.
John Jones, interim provost.As part of the celebration, Khafre plans to erect a permanent marker on the site in honor of cotton pickers from the Mississippi Delta and in commemoration of the significance of this historical event.
This will be a day of stimulating discussion about historic preservation, leading-edge research, innovative practices, and foundational values. The two-day event concludes with a good-old-fashion “black-tie” (or period-piece costume) “Cotton-Pickers’ Ball,” on October 18, 2013. This year Khafre, Inc in conjunction with Mississippi Valley State University shall organize the USA’s premier interdisciplinary professional meeting on cotton, sharecropping, and its cultural significance.
The deadline is September 6, 2013.Plan to join us in Itta Bena, Mississippi!This is your chance to catch up with old friends and colleagues at The Valley, make important new contacts, discuss the latest in cultural management, stay current with research findings in the historic preservation field, and connect with people who share your core values.
We invite all community-based experts in any field to become a part of the challenge to address issues of: unemployment, entrepreneurship, illiteracy, poor self-esteem, teen pregnancy, obesity, hopelessness, communication skills, journalism and creative writing, etc. Situated on the bayou waterfront at 103 and 105 Main Street, in historic downtown Indianola, da' House is the place where folks come together in the spirit of unity and love for Mississippi Delta culture, particularly its blues, spirituals and teacakes! On the historical Wall of Fame are signatures by musicians from Ghana, Senegal, Nigeria, Norway, Belguim, China, Japan, France, Cameroon, Cote d'Ivoire and Mississippi, of course. Beginning Friday, June 1, 2012, at 7 pm, the folks at da' House will be carrying on in grand teacake style, until Sunday June 3rd, around midnight.
Celebrating da love that is shared all around the world for da Delta music, art and culture. The 2nd Anniversary Celebration is dedicated to Deltas own David Honeyboy Edward, David Lee Durham, David Thompson and Mississippi Slim. These legendary bluesmen have recently joined the ancestors and will be honored by several local artists and civic leaders: Mickey Rogers, Dr. These artists and many others will perform on da historical Front Porch stage where the legendary bluesman Sam Chatmons music room door is gracefully hinged. The door, the traditional quilts, the African art, the sweet smell of Soul Food and the Delta cotton provide a rural sophistication and ambiance that is reminicient of the culture and folk art once owned and coveted by grandmamma-nem. Indeed, it is "The home for artful giving, music and songs," as Chicago-based Blues promoter Lynn Orman Weiss described da' House on her most recent visit to the Delta.
And, since da' House is located at the epicenter of the Cotton Kingdom, visitors can expect that authentic soothing, and often times healing, Mississippi Delta experience to be dosed up in abundantly royal fashion, every time they come to da' House! Co-owners Robert Terrell and C.Sade Turnipseed extend a personal and heartfelt invitation for everyone to come on out to da House and help celebrate two-years of Delta art, music and culture. She is also the first African-American female president to lead a Mississippi public university. Since assuming her position on January 1, 2009, she has launched The Valley Renaissance, the institutions five-year strategic plan, which is pictorially depicted by the African Adinkra symbol of a Sankofa a bird that flies with his head facingbackwards as he advances forward without getting off track.
Grammy-winning blues musician David "Honeyboy" Edwards, believed to be the oldest surviving Delta bluesman and whose roots stretched back to blues legend Robert Johnson, died early Monday, Aug.
Maya Angelou agreed to graciously lend her name to the Cotton Pickers of America Monument and Sharecroppers Interpretive Center project that is in development, in the Mississippi Delta.
C.Sade Turnipseed, Founder of the Monument project and Executive Director of Khafre, Inc, recently made the announcement in a community meeting held at da House of Khafre, in Indianola.
Our teams collective effort honors the sacrifices made by millions of Americans and purposefully gives dignity back to the legacy of those who spent their entire lives working, tirelessly to build this country.Dr.
Smith Reynolds Professor of American Studies at Wake Forest University, joins a long and growing list of American citizens, who have also expressed the desire to support this project and demonstrate their respect and gratitude to every man, woman and child that picked cotton and were never thanked, nor properly compensated as enslaved workers or as sharecroppers, throughout the American south.The Khafre, Inc team is composed of a governing Board of Directors, a Steering Committee, a Board of Advisors and several political and community leaders that include faculty members from the History Department at Middle Tennessee State University (MTSU). The governing Board selected world-renowned monument designer, Ed Dwight, to develop the thirty-foot statue and sculptural park.
It offers educational workshops, seminars and conferences for the entire community that celebrate Mississippis culture and its contributions to world history, including music, cuisine, writing, andotherartistic expressions.
Turnipseed is also the host of Delta Renaissance, the number one cultural arts television talk show in the Delta, which airs weekly on WABG-TV, WABG-Radio and Delta Fox-10 television networks.Plans are also underway to incorporate the completed work into the National Parks Services, to insure prosperity and proper maintenance of the Monument. To help the Cotton Pickers of America Monument and Sharecroppers Interpretive Center be included as part of the National Parks System, please sign the online petition.
To have name(s) of family members included in the Monument, download a Legacy Brick application; both petition and application are available on the Khafre, Inc. Sato returns to the Front Porch Stage solo, on Sunday March 6th, at 6pm, to kick off the Cultural Competency workshop series. These are on-going cultural appreciation classes presented for the first time in the Delta, by Khafre, Inc (a Mississippi-based non-profit organization).Sato, who was born and raised in Japan, will introduce to American audiences his interpretation of Mississippi Delta Blues and perform on one of his traditional instruments called a Samisen.



Configuration management training australia victoria
Rawls college of business leadership council


Comments

  1. 31.10.2015 at 23:26:18


    Life of sin, and that is the.

    Author: Vista
  2. 31.10.2015 at 16:57:33


    And warnings of applying the load your Relaxation For.

    Author: 1818
  3. 31.10.2015 at 10:29:55


    All of the Beautiful Life module practice and internalize abilities inside the classroom, which.

    Author: ELSAN