Social media more available marketing tools,online marketing jobs in mumbai for freshers,hp officejet 4355 software download for windows xp,marketing business events - You Shoud Know

The stations comprise lime-wood reliefs mounted on an oak base surmounted with the cross, and are to be found on the walls of the nave. The devotion reflects the practice of pilgrims to Jerusalem who, from earliest times to the current day, have followed the way of the Cross from the house of Pilate to Calvary and wished to re-enact this journey on their return home. The traditional pilgrimage route in Jerusalem starts at the site of Pilate’s Judgement Hall in the Antonia and follows the Via Dolorosa through the narrow streets of Old Jerusalem to come to the Basilica of the Holy Sepulchre on Calvary Hill. When the Franciscans received custody of the holy places in medieval times, they encouraged the erection of tableaux in their own churches depicting the sacrificial journey. With the recovered theology of the paschal mystery stressing the integral unity of Christ’s death and resurrection, a fifteenth station representing the resurrection has frequently been added to the series.
The Old Saint Paul’s archives reflect our long history of worship, social care and structural development.
Extensive written records of baptisms, confirmations, marriages and burials exist from 1735 onwards and there are other minute, seat rental and account ledgers, congregational rolls, and service and offertory records from the late 18th century. An annotated catalogue of all this material has been prepared which shows details of the date ranges and contents of each book. Photographs of the church, clergy and events at OSP cover the late 19th century, from 1895 to the present, and show the rich diversity of worship and social events that haven taken place here. Plans of the various structural modifications to the church show how its architecture has developed over the past 125 years. The Old Saint Paul’s website has been designed to be accessible to as many different browsing devices as possible, including screenreaders and mobile browsers. The site complies with XHTML and CSS coding standards recommended by the World Wide Web Consortium.
CSS is used to format the content of the site for display on computer monitors, and to ensure that background images and colours intended only for screen display do not appear when pages are printed. The site’s content is accessible to all browsing devices capable of rendering a basic XHTML tagset. A print stylesheet has been created to hide inessential page content such as masthead images, sidebars and footers from printers.
If you are using an older browser, including Internet Explorer 6.0, we recommend you take a couple of minutes to upgrade it. For more details about booking the hall, and its availability, please contact the church office by email (or phone, Wednesdays and Fridays). Baptised members of all churches are welcome to receive Holy Communion; all are welcome to receive a blessing at the altar. 10.30am - High Mass, with Sunday School and Creche Refreshments are available after High Mass.
6.30pm - Solemn Evensong & Benediction During choir vacation in July Evening Prayer is said.
It is known that the building had an organ by 1712, although this was removed by Bishop Rose in 1716 and eventually found its way to Grantown Episcopal Church.
In the mid-19th century the church building became structurally unsound and it was closed in 1873.
Slight modifications were made to this instrument in 1936; it was electrified and enlarged in 1960 when a new console with tab stops was provided.
By the mid 1970s the organ was in need of complete cleaning and the 1960 console was causing problems.
The work was carried out in conjunction with the then organist, Alistair Pow, and with advice from Roy Massey of Hereford Cathedral.
The organ as it now stands is a fine, flexible instrument which accompanies services particularly well and which is also a fine vehicle for much of the solo organ repertoire. SO FAR AS we can tell from the archival material available, Old Saint Paul’s has had a choir for most of its life, perhaps from the late 19th century when the congregation moved into the present building. The late Alistair Pow worked hard to build up the choir’s contribution to the liturgy during the 1970s. Leslie Shankland was assistant to Alistair Pow from the 1970s onwards, and eventually took over as Director of Music on Easter Day 1980 when Alistair moved on. Among British cathedrals, St Mary’s had been pioneering in having a mixed treble line as early as the 1970s.
In June 2007, Les Shankland resigned because of family commitments, having given more than 30 years of unstinting service to Old Saint Paul’s. Over the years since Old Saint Paul’s humble beginnings in the late 17th century, our worship styles have evolved from secret prayer meetings in an old wool store to something enriched and developed by history across the centuries. The Mass (or Eucharist or Lord’s Supper) is at the heart of Christian spiritual life.
Old Saint Paul’s is part of the Edinburgh diocese of the Scottish Episcopal Church, which is part of the world-wide Anglican Communion. We ask all members of the congregation to keep their giving under review and to raise it when they can.
If you are a taxpayer and you sign a Gift Aid declaration, we can claim back tax on your offering (currently 25p for every pound).
The Glorious Revolution: King James VII flees to France, replaced by the Protestant Mary & William III of Orange. There have been people worshipping on this site since 1689, when a breakaway group from the old Cathedral of Saint Giles led by Bishop Alexander Rose moved into an old wool store in Carrubber’s Close. Although the present building dates from the 19th century, Old Saint Paul’s has a history going back 300 years to the beginning of the Scottish Episcopal Church. The Reformation came to Scotland in 1560 under John Knox, the first Protestant minister of Saint Giles’ Church. Whilst the Presbyterian Church was loyal to the new Protestant monarchy, the Episcopalians remained staunchly Jacobite, loyal to James and his descendants.
As a result of the Risings, any Episcopal chapel was regarded as a potential bed of treason and repressive laws were passed.
After the Jacobites’ defeat at Culloden in 1746, Episcopal clergy ran the risk of imprisonment or deportation to America. Remembering his days at Saint Paul’s, he returned to Scotland and was consecrated in 1784 in Aberdeen. In the middle of the 19th Century the liturgy at Saint Paul’s was affected by a variety of influences, most notably by the first emergence of the Anglo-Catholic Oxford Movement. One figure looms large over the first half of the 20th century, that of Albert Ernest Laurie, who became Rector in 1898 and held this position until his death in 1937. Since that time, members of the congregation have included people of all walks of life in Scottish history, from supporters of Bonnie Prince Charlie to enthusiasts for the modern Scottish Parliament, from the wealthy to the poor, from the conventional to the eccentric. This great variety of people share something in common - they love the liturgy at Old Saint Paul’s.
The uniquely special services that happen in Holy Week, the most important part of the Christian Year, are profound symbols of Christian faith. Of course there are other special services throughout the Christian Year: please see Forthcoming Services for details of our next services, and Regular Service Times for times of our regular weekday services. We value the link with former ages represented by the ancient liturgy and its formal dignity. This we make tangible in a whole range of ways from our Walking Group and the Tithing Group to the Vestry and the Finance Committee to the Property Committee. From time to time we run short courses for people who want to find out more about the worship tradition here, or perhaps about the Episcopal Church, or about the Christian faith more generally. So whether or not you have already come inside Old Saint Paul’s, I would like to invite you to find out a little more about just who we are and what we do. The ordained ministry team at Old Saint Paul’s consists of myself and Jenny Wright (stipendiary deacon). I hope that you will find Old Saint Paul’s to be a true spiritual home, a community in which you can feel accepted and valued for being yourself, and in which you too can find the love of God and the friendship of others. BUUF Board members are phoning our members and friends with a short survey a€“ only six questions!
5.If not, do you want to be part of a religious community, or is that not important to you? 6.Is there anything else you would like to say about how we can improve BUUF to better meet your needs?
When I graduated from Minnehaha Academy, a Christian high school, in 1950, no black people were allowed on campus, or even on opposing football teams. When I graduated from Moody Bible Institute in 1953, only one black person was allowed on campus.
In 1953, on my way to Baylor University in Waco, Texas, I spent the night in a Fort Worth hotel. When I arrived at Louisville Presbyterian Seminary in 1958, the school had just enrolled its first black student. Camp UniStar on Cass Lake offers ten family weeks with various programs, a work week, and two youth weeks.
The National Youth Justice Training is a transformative three-week experience for high-school aged youth. Unity Church-Unitarian presents its 24th annual Unity Childrena€™s Musical, a€?Donuts, Monkeys, Sprinkles and a Scarfa€? on Thurs. Now in its 24th year, this Unity Childrena€™s Musical a€“ from the script to the music to the choreography a€“ is original material created for Unitya€™s children, who comprise the entire cast. They were restored by the Conservation Department of the National Museums of Scotland in March 1996. Many of the fixtures and fittings in the church have been photographed and documented, putting them in the historical context of major gifts to the church.
When you print one of the site’s pages the body text and any relevant images will be printed, but nothing else.
Current uses include dance sessions, concerts, band rehearsals, public meetings and social occasions.
Please note that the hall is never available on Sundays before 2pm (when it is used for parish activities). Three further instruments seem to have been in use in Old Saint Paul’s until the present instrument was installed. Like many chancel organs, it suffers slightly from its position, speaking across the chancel rather than directly into the nave. Apparently women were sometimes drafted in to swell the ranks, but were obliged to sing from the Memorial Chapel, since they were not permitted to appear in the choir stalls!  Happily, times have changed. Les continued to diversify and extend the choral repertoire, and steadily to raise musical standards. The rest of our choir members are volunteers, and we are always happy to hear from new volunteers.
This does not include the costs of any exceptional expenditure; just day to day running costs, and our routine maintenance programme. Rather, we want everyone to feel such an integral part of this community that each one of us gives according to our means with the same kind of spirit of generosity we would give to any other member of our family.


Members of Saint Paul’s were in the front line of the Jacobite struggle, several having been in action in the Risings of 1715 and 1745. It was only after the death of Prince Charlie in 1788 that the association of the Episcopalians with Jacobite treason was shaken off.
Conflict over liturgical matters led to a breakaway church being founded, St Columba’s by the Castle.
Laurie’s life reflected his intense devotion to the Blessed Sacrament - he continued the gradual shift to a more Catholic form of worship and he was a caring and faithful pastor to his flock. A joint service with Saint Giles’ Cathedral included a procession up the Royal Mile, retracing the path of Bishop Rose, and High Mass was celebrated in the old Cathedral for the first time in 300 years. This website will help you get a sense of the people and the range of events and activities that make up our Church. One of the gifts God seems to have given us, in the past and in the present day, is an immense variety of members. There is Palm Sunday, followed by Tenebrae on Wednesday, the High Mass of Maundy Thursday with washing of the feet and stripping of the altars, the Liturgy of Good Friday and the wonderful celebration of High Mass of the Easter Vigil at 5.00 in the morning, followed by breakfast and a second High Mass at a more civilised 10.30am!
We look after our young adults and children, and of course we support and value our wonderful Choir. But please ask me - or any of the people named in our Who’s Who section - if you have any questions or suggestions.
Above all, I would like to welcome you into our church, to be a part of our vibrant and interesting - indeed, some say distinctively offbeat - congregation.
We are always available to you for pastoral support, personal discussion, and spiritual counsel. March 13Tally Wright, seminary intern at the UU Church in Wayzata, will tell her story of childhood inquisitiveness to a seminary at a mature age.
The stations were installed in Old Saint Paul’s on 23 March 1996, and used for the first time on Palm Sunday 1996. During the annual Edinburgh Festival Fringe the hall is converted into a performance space as Venue 45. Nicholson’s of Worcester was chosen to rebuild the organ, to replan the specification and to provide a new console. Edinburgh Society of Organists, 1991) for further information on the early history of organs in Old Saint Paul’s. By the early 1990s it was clear that we could no longer manage to maintain a treble line of boys alone as we had done in the past. Since we sing a wide range of music on minimal rehearsal, good sight-reading skills are essential.
Besides, this giving is a very practical, tangible way of showing our commitment to God and to the community in which we live. You only need to sign one form, but can adjust the level of your giving as and when necessary or desired. In the new anti-Catholic climate, the Church of Scotland abolished the rule of bishops, the last remaining element of the pre-Reformation Church. In later years he was chosen to become the first Bishop of the United States and returned to Britain to be consecrated. He received the Military Cross for his bravery in caring for the wounded at the battle of the Somme, and there are numerous tales of his continued acts of charity to his flock in the Canongate. We are also looking to the needs of the present world, including those of the people we are involved with in our own lives, day by day.
13Our own Maria Maki will talk about her experiences working with a€?Global Volunteers Worldwidea€?. 27A Town Meeting on the a€?Think Offa€? question for 2013: What is more ethical: following your principles, or compromise? This year’s theme: “Cotton Sacks and Freedom Quilt Narratives” substantiates the viability of the sweat equity investment made through labor and cultural contributions by Cotton Pickers and other Plantation Workers. The great dulciana was extended down to 16’ pitch, and several other changes and additions were made. The above account draws on information from that publication, and also from material provided by Alistair Pow. Instead, we followed the lead of our own St Mary’s Episcopal Cathedral in Edinburgh in building up a treble line of boys and girls (up to about the age of 15 or 16). The following evening, Friday November 13, the “Cotton Pickers Ball” shall be held at 7:00pm, in da’ House of Khafre, located at 300 Main Street, Indianola. All are encouraged to attend both events in costume attire worn in the cotton fields, such as “overalls and straw hats, etc.”The 1st Annual Historical Narrative Competition enhances this year’s Symposium.
Mississippi Delta high school seniors and MVSU students will compete for a trophy and gift card provided by Khafre, Inc and Lost Pizza, Company. All projects must be delivered to the MVSU Social Sciences office “T” by 5:00pm November 5th, (or call organizers to arrange for pick up). Professor, Public Policy, MVSU; Dr Alpha Diarra, National Cotton Spokesman of Mali, West Africa. Local storyteller Helen Sims will pay tribute to “the Spirit of Mama Lula.” Hollandale folk artist Dorothy Hoskins will showcase recent multi-media work on Cotton Pickin’ and Sharecropping in the American South.
The University is driven by its commitment to excellence in teaching, learning, service, and research--a commitment resulting in a learner-centered environment that prepares critical thinkers, exceptional communicators, and service-oriented, engaged, and productive citizens.
MVSU is fundamentally committed to positively affecting the quality of life and creating extraordinary educational opportunities for the Mississippi Delta and beyond. KHAFRE, Inc. Honoring the legacy of  “grandmamma-nem” in a university setting gives artistic and academic license to the pursuit of gaining more scholarship and international acceptance, of the contributions and sweat equity made by the people who picked cotton throughout the American South,” said Professor C.Sade Turnipseed, Executive Director of Khafre, Inc.
As part of Khafre, Inc’s historic preservation efforts, a permanent marker will be placed on the MVSU campus in honor of cotton pickers from the Mississippi Delta, and those who worked the repurposed cotton plantation for higher learning, MVSU.The Symposium is free admission.
Khafre, Inc is all about building monumental programs that allow reflection, reconnection, and renewal.
This year’s theme: “Cotton Sacks and Freedom Quilt Narratives” will stimulate a day of discussion about historic preservation, leading-edge research, innovative practices, and foundational values. The agency and resistance of these narratives will also reflect on the subtle and continuing impact of cotton on life in the Delta and throughout the South.
The one-day event concludes with a good old fashion “black-tie” (or period-piece costume) “Cotton-Pickers’ Ball and Ancestral Celebration” at da’ House of Khafre located at 300 Main St. Julianne Malveaux; and, introduction by award-winning poet Chinaka Hodge the volume offers a balanced view of what our children face day-to-day, on the streets of America.
Over two hundred years ago, the Akan Nation (West Africa) established the Adinkra Symbols to visually communicate a system of living for African people to observe and learn. Amazingly, just as with other inspired and spiritual writings, drawings, etc., the symbols are beautiful design concepts with meanings still relevant today.
They bring clarity and resolve to the question, “What do we (the village) have to do to show support and love for each other and ultimately save ourselves and one another?” The experiences of today’s youth culture demonstrate a fundamental disconnect, to most people of previous generations. The young writers selected for this publication masterfully describe the challenge in dealing with today’s world. Because, it offers tribute to the “original” mother and her instinctual knowing of the spiritual paths that her children (all children) must take to find their way out of harm's way. Revealed, in this collection of writings are a wonderful array of short stories, poems and proverbs that present a familial insight born by the great liberator of liberators, Harriet Tubman! By Writers of the 21st Century is an affiliate of Young Publishers Network (YPN) and Khafre, Inc a 501(c)(3) organization working in the Mississippi Delta to improve the welfare and healthy living environments of children in America and around the world.### Thank You Mr. Born in a cabin on a cotton plantation outside Berclair, Mississippi in 1925, his entire life, much like the lives of so many others from the Mississippi Delta, was spent in service to others. Unfortunately, for most of his contemporaries (colleagues, family of friends) they never received the accolades, appreciation, or respect for their life-long work as cotton-pickers in the American South.
David Matthews, MS Congressman Bennie Thompson, MS Senator Thad Cochran, National Parks Director Dr Jon Jarvis, Mr. Theodore Turnipseed, Sr., and millions of others understand the importance of sharing, and erecting a statue and National Park dedicated to the countless field workers of the American South. Though unrecognized and unappreciated, these people worked from sun up to sun down tilling, planting, chopping, picking and spinning cotton, in the blazing hot sun … This and many other horrifying conditions of the historic Mississippi Delta evoked the music we call “the Blues.”On May 21, 2014, during the last year of his life Mr. King accepted our call to become the “Honorary Chair” of Khafre, Inc, a Mississippi-based 501(3) not-for-profit organization. Maya Angelou as the Honorary Chair of the Cotton Pickers of America and the Sharecroppers Interpretive Center project.
The plan is to build a thirty-foot high monument on twenty acres of cotton land along Highway 61, just outside the historic Black town Mound Bayou, MS. This is a historically rare opportunity to transform many lives in the Delta and engage conversations about race and social inequities in America. Sade Turnipseed is the Executive Director of Khafre, Inc and teaches American History at Mississippi Valley State University, in Itta Bena, the birthplace of Mr. This year’s theme: “Cotton Sacks and Freedom Quilts Narratives” will stimulate a day of discussion about historic preservation, leading-edge research, innovative practices, and foundational values. No one has ever “officially” said “thank you” to the people in the American South, who literally tilled the way to the economic greatness for many countries and regions around the world. Somewhere along the way the respect and honor for their hard-earned sweat-equity investment in the wealth of others was lost and buried in the bloodstained, tear-soaked soils of the American South. Something “monumental,” needs to happen…like a National Park named the “Cotton Pickers of America Monument and Sharecroppers Interpretive Center” along the Blues Highway 61.
Once the Monument is installed, the organizers’ plan is to turn it over to the federal government for the protection and honor that only this country can provide. It shall serve as a permanent reminder and ever-present sign of respect for those whose hope for a brighter day wore thin, while working from kin to kain’t (can’t see in the morning to can’t see at night).The world must be reminded of the work ethic held by the people in the South…in most instances it was an honorable legacy … the tragedy is they were never properly compensated, nor thanked. King, (aka: The King of the Blues) will join the effort to build a National Monument in the Mississippi Delta. King understands, as do all members of the Khafre, Inc family, that a healing will come through recognition and a true recounting of the history of cotton and its impact in the South.In September, 2009, Khafre, Inc, based in Indianola, Mississippi, embarked upon a journey designed to thank the sons and daughters of the South who helped, albeit it without accolades, fanfare, or even recognition, build the cotton empire that fueled the American economy for nearly two centuries. The impetus for the project: Cotton Pickers of America and Sharecroppers Interpretative Center (hereafter referred to as the Cotton Pickers Monument Complex) is the need to thank those who toiled in the Delta soil for generations without the pay, appreciation, or the dignity they deserved. The Cotton Pickers Monument Complex would not only help heal wounds that have festered for decades, but would also help to empower the generations of family members who have been negatively impacted by this unfortunate era in American history.
This is truly a historic endeavor that has the rare opportunity of actually transforming lives, communities, and the conversations about race in America and throughout the world.           These deeply held convictions of education and empowerment are keys to improving the quality of life for all within the Delta. They have helped to catapult Khafre into numerous projects, which are all connected to the vision and mission of this value-driven and movement-oriented organization that is designed to provide historical, health related, and cultural education and outreach to the communities of the Mississippi Delta. Khafre has already helped young people successfully publish literature, prepare for careers in the television and radio broadcast industry, produce staged events and engage in healthy behaviors through diet and exercise, all with the assistance of grant dollars and strategic partnerships.The crowning work of Khafre remains the Cotton Pickers Monument Complex, a dream, which is coming closer to fruition, day by day, because of the unprecedented support of Mr. We have also received Congressional acknowledgment and endorsement from United States Congressmen, Bennie Thompson and Danny Davis, official endorsements from United States Senators, Thad Cochran and Roger Wicker, and expressed support from Dr John Jarvis, National Parks Director. Carroll Van West and Rebecca Conard from Middle Tennessee State University’s History Department, along with the ongoing partnership with Mississippi Valley State University, has proven a significant benefit to our overall project.
We are now ready to raise the $26 million dollars to make the Cotton Pickers Monument complex a reality.


We look forward to hearing from you and to welcoming your partnership in the building of this long overdue and much needed monument.It is time!Most sincerely,C. The goal is to obtain as much first-hand information as possible relating to the development of America’s Cotton Kingdom (aka the Delta).In the aftermaths of completing the academic study for a Doctorate in Public History at Middle Tennessee State University (MTSU), Professor C.
Turnipseed’s theory that perceptions of sharecropping, tenant farming, etc, will be altered in ways that are beneficial to the legacy of the American South when the memory of elders are shared.
The monument site is envisioned to become a National Park; and thereby “the place” for memory and community sharing in the Mississippi Delta, for educational, economic development, and international tourism purposes.
King and former honorary chair Dr Maya Angelou who are determined to improve the legacy and social-economic status of Mississippi Delta residents. The purpose of the organization is to provide educational, lifestyle and cultural programs, build monuments and memorials to honor, celebrate, and recognize the rich and complex history of the Mississippi Delta and to positively impact the quality of life of those living in the Delta, especially the disproportionately poor African American community. There is no documented official acknowledgment of the people who tilled the path to America’s greatness. Somewhere along the way buried in the tear-soaked soils of the American South, the respect and honor for their hard-earned investment was lost.
The Cotton Pickers of America Monument, Sharecroppers Interpretive Center, and Cotton Kingdom Trail make the case for building a National Park that offers a small token of appreciation for their tireless uncompensated work. Sade Turnipseed is the founder of Khafre, Inc., which has developed the Cotton Pickers of America Monument, the Sharecroppers Interpretive Center, and the Cotton Kingdom Historical Trail, among many other projects.
King Museum and Delta Interpretive Center in Indianola and the former cultural arts director for the Mississippi Action for Community Education--MACE (producers of the MS Delta Blues and Heritage Festival) in Greenville. Turnipseed is the recipient of several community service and arts advocacy awards, and she was an independent candidate for mayor of the city of Indianola in 2013.
For the past eight years Turnipseed was the host of “Delta Renaissance,” a cultural arts talk show focusing on the arts, education, and political issues in the Mississippi Delta. Winter Building Wednesday, June 18: Former Secretary of State Dick Molpus talks about his experience during the Philadelphia civil rights murders of 1964. Wednesday, July 2: Filmmaker Wilma Mosley-Clopton will show and discuss her new film, "Did Johnny Come Marching Home?" about people of African descent who fought to free themselves in the Civil War.
Wednesday, September 25: Author Robert Blade will talk about his book, "Tupelo Man," a biography of George McLean. I whole-heartedly agree with the editor that the African American community has proven to the world an uncanny, though unreciprocated, ability to be forgiving of past deeds of injustice, brutality and cruelty at the voting polls, and socially in their community service groups, churches and everyday lives.
This point should not be lost on the fact that many of those injustices happened here, in Indianola, Mississippi, to some amazingly strong and resilient individuals like Fannie Lou Hamer and all those who came before her.
But, I can’t help but wonder why the White community isn’t reciprocating and showing the same confidence and trust in racial relations?As Smith indicates, the incumbent received “between 32 and 37% of the votes in the three wards with large Black majorities, despite going up against two black opponents, with strong followings.
That’s impressive for a white candidate in a city and region with a history of racially divided politics.” I agree.
When we examine the voter polls in the wards that are predominately African American, reflected is a general evenness for all candidates, be they Black or White.
The same, however, cannot be said about the two wards that reflect the primarily White community. I submit to you the following:In wards I, and II, which are the two wards with the largest white population of voters, we see results that reflect an uncompromising resistance to acceptance and change. With an overall total of 952 votes cast: 732 went to the White candidate and 220 for the two Blacks, combined)…check that! Surely, it cannot be left up to one segment of the community, and not the other.I truly wish Smith had stressed this very critical point, instead of throwing shade on the outcome of a campaign I have yet to wage.
And for the record, as a citizen, it is my right to be afforded the opportunity to run a fair and unbiased race for mayor, without subtle suggestions that it is a waste of my time, as inferred in his editorial. But, then again maybe he knows more than I about how citizens of wards I and II will ultimately vote. And to also trust that the leaders of this community will look out for their best interest, politically, economically and socially.
After all we live in a community that is 84% African American with a poverty rate that is fast approaching 40% and a public school system that is in deplorable condition, both physically and academically, even under the watchful eye of the government, yet there is no outrage…from either the White side, or the Black side of town.
And, I have never believed it was necessary to wait until political season to demonstrate my commitment to the people in my community.
If, by chance I am truly embraced by all members of all wards of this city, I believe people will witness an amazing transformation in a relatively short period of time.
It’s “almost” like magic…I predict things will begin to unfold in a substantive way like the neighborhoods will brighten, crime decreases and the impoverished mindset disappears. And I am passionate enough to find the tools to help remedy the concerns that create stagnation and distrust. Please remember, we are a people who come from a very long tradition of women who made a way out of no way.My overall ambition and hope for this city is to develop a strategic plan that enables a steady stream of culturally enriched projects that insures economic development for the future growth and safety in this city.
So programs that not only engage everyone, but present real opportunities for career enhancements and social activities are critical.
King Museum that I visualized and administered) Thanks Carver Randle, Sr for that wonderful quote. I just wish he read my bio, or googled me, before publishing doubts about my abilities for success. For the past three years, I have been sitting relatively quietly completing the doctorate in history. Now, I am ready to shake up this town with some bold ideas and ever increasing standards for excellence.
I look forward to being a significant force in this community, by helping the White community too recognize the benefits of building relationships that they can trust in leadership positions. We MUST work together to improve our community—by encouraging EVERYONE to clean on our streets, bayou, parks, etc. We have some huge unmet challenges here in Indianola, and how YOU decide to vote On December 10, 2013, is vital to our success. Also, please be sure to come to this year's event in your overalls, or cotton pickin' clothes. The event is the impetus that gave rise to the “Remigration Home from Chicago to Mississippi” cultural movement organized by music promoters Gus Redmond and Robert Terrell.
Legendary blues and gospel performers Otis Clay, Syl Johnson and Marshal Thompson (founder and lead singer of the ChiLites); along with promoter Gus Redmond will lead the way back home to Mississippi in an effort to support the Cotton Pickers of America Monument and Sharecroppers Interpretive Center project in the historical Cotton Kingdom AKA the Mississippi Delta. Though the Ball is a “Black Tie Affair” Overalls or other “cotton pickin” attire are encouraged and expected.“I am so pleased that we have partnered with Khafre to host an event of this magnitude,” said Dr. The discussions and historical presentations will reflect cutting-edge research, innovative practices and foundational values. Additionally, two noted scholars from Mali’s Cotton Manufacturing and Distribution will present via Skype.MVSU participants in the program include Dr.
John Jones, interim provost.As part of the celebration, Khafre plans to erect a permanent marker on the site in honor of cotton pickers from the Mississippi Delta and in commemoration of the significance of this historical event.
This will be a day of stimulating discussion about historic preservation, leading-edge research, innovative practices, and foundational values. The two-day event concludes with a good-old-fashion “black-tie” (or period-piece costume) “Cotton-Pickers’ Ball,” on October 18, 2013.
This year Khafre, Inc in conjunction with Mississippi Valley State University shall organize the USA’s premier interdisciplinary professional meeting on cotton, sharecropping, and its cultural significance. The deadline is September 6, 2013.Plan to join us in Itta Bena, Mississippi!This is your chance to catch up with old friends and colleagues at The Valley, make important new contacts, discuss the latest in cultural management, stay current with research findings in the historic preservation field, and connect with people who share your core values.
We invite all community-based experts in any field to become a part of the challenge to address issues of: unemployment, entrepreneurship, illiteracy, poor self-esteem, teen pregnancy, obesity, hopelessness, communication skills, journalism and creative writing, etc. Situated on the bayou waterfront at 103 and 105 Main Street, in historic downtown Indianola, da' House is the place where folks come together in the spirit of unity and love for Mississippi Delta culture, particularly its blues, spirituals and teacakes! On the historical Wall of Fame are signatures by musicians from Ghana, Senegal, Nigeria, Norway, Belguim, China, Japan, France, Cameroon, Cote d'Ivoire and Mississippi, of course.
Beginning Friday, June 1, 2012, at 7 pm, the folks at da' House will be carrying on in grand teacake style, until Sunday June 3rd, around midnight. Celebrating da love that is shared all around the world for da Delta music, art and culture. The 2nd Anniversary Celebration is dedicated to Deltas own David Honeyboy Edward, David Lee Durham, David Thompson and Mississippi Slim. These legendary bluesmen have recently joined the ancestors and will be honored by several local artists and civic leaders: Mickey Rogers, Dr. These artists and many others will perform on da historical Front Porch stage where the legendary bluesman Sam Chatmons music room door is gracefully hinged. The door, the traditional quilts, the African art, the sweet smell of Soul Food and the Delta cotton provide a rural sophistication and ambiance that is reminicient of the culture and folk art once owned and coveted by grandmamma-nem.
Indeed, it is "The home for artful giving, music and songs," as Chicago-based Blues promoter Lynn Orman Weiss described da' House on her most recent visit to the Delta. And, since da' House is located at the epicenter of the Cotton Kingdom, visitors can expect that authentic soothing, and often times healing, Mississippi Delta experience to be dosed up in abundantly royal fashion, every time they come to da' House! Co-owners Robert Terrell and C.Sade Turnipseed extend a personal and heartfelt invitation for everyone to come on out to da House and help celebrate two-years of Delta art, music and culture.
She is also the first African-American female president to lead a Mississippi public university. Since assuming her position on January 1, 2009, she has launched The Valley Renaissance, the institutions five-year strategic plan, which is pictorially depicted by the African Adinkra symbol of a Sankofa a bird that flies with his head facingbackwards as he advances forward without getting off track.
Grammy-winning blues musician David "Honeyboy" Edwards, believed to be the oldest surviving Delta bluesman and whose roots stretched back to blues legend Robert Johnson, died early Monday, Aug. Maya Angelou agreed to graciously lend her name to the Cotton Pickers of America Monument and Sharecroppers Interpretive Center project that is in development, in the Mississippi Delta.
C.Sade Turnipseed, Founder of the Monument project and Executive Director of Khafre, Inc, recently made the announcement in a community meeting held at da House of Khafre, in Indianola. Our teams collective effort honors the sacrifices made by millions of Americans and purposefully gives dignity back to the legacy of those who spent their entire lives working, tirelessly to build this country.Dr.
Smith Reynolds Professor of American Studies at Wake Forest University, joins a long and growing list of American citizens, who have also expressed the desire to support this project and demonstrate their respect and gratitude to every man, woman and child that picked cotton and were never thanked, nor properly compensated as enslaved workers or as sharecroppers, throughout the American south.The Khafre, Inc team is composed of a governing Board of Directors, a Steering Committee, a Board of Advisors and several political and community leaders that include faculty members from the History Department at Middle Tennessee State University (MTSU).
The governing Board selected world-renowned monument designer, Ed Dwight, to develop the thirty-foot statue and sculptural park. It offers educational workshops, seminars and conferences for the entire community that celebrate Mississippis culture and its contributions to world history, including music, cuisine, writing, andotherartistic expressions.
Turnipseed is also the host of Delta Renaissance, the number one cultural arts television talk show in the Delta, which airs weekly on WABG-TV, WABG-Radio and Delta Fox-10 television networks.Plans are also underway to incorporate the completed work into the National Parks Services, to insure prosperity and proper maintenance of the Monument.
To help the Cotton Pickers of America Monument and Sharecroppers Interpretive Center be included as part of the National Parks System, please sign the online petition. To have name(s) of family members included in the Monument, download a Legacy Brick application; both petition and application are available on the Khafre, Inc. Sato returns to the Front Porch Stage solo, on Sunday March 6th, at 6pm, to kick off the Cultural Competency workshop series. These are on-going cultural appreciation classes presented for the first time in the Delta, by Khafre, Inc (a Mississippi-based non-profit organization).Sato, who was born and raised in Japan, will introduce to American audiences his interpretation of Mississippi Delta Blues and perform on one of his traditional instruments called a Samisen.



Top video editing software professional edition
Vlc media player download windows 7 english
Keynote presentation templates free download
Marketing plans examples 8086



Comments to «Social media more available marketing tools»

  1. O_R_K_H_A_N writes:
    Exactly where all the buyers are free of charge to see whether or not.
  2. Janna writes:
    Your audio and video files.