In an effort to deal with this confusion, this record relies heavily on the Genealogies of Connecticut Families from the New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol. It seems quite probable that the son, Richard II, who inherited the tenement lands at Cholesbury, would be the father of Richard III, of Cholesbury, whose three sons migrated to Milford, Conn.
John, the son of Richard I, remained on the farm at Dungrove long enough to be the the executor of his Mother's will in 1565, and as the overseer of his brother, Henry's, will dated January 2, 1599. Still there were other Baldwins, from the same area in Buckinghamshire, England, who came to Milford, Connecticut at about the same time. There was at least one other Richard Baldwin born in Milford at about the same time as the one listed above, and who was a nephew to the above Richard.
It is possible there were other Richard Baldwins in Milford at this time, but no others can be found in the records who would be anywhere close to the age of Ann Warrups. Ann Warrups resided with her Father, Chicken Warrups, at Greenfarms, between Westport and Fairfield and about 12 miles southwest of Milford. The Indians continued to move farther inland and set up new settlements only to have white settlers follow them and either buy, or take, their lands. This couple had at least three daughters: Mary, Caroline and Rebecca, and one son, John Baldwin II. Josiah Bearce II, probably died in New Milford, Connecticut, in late 1787, at almost 67 years of age.
Before the colonial period, Connecticut had a large Indian population but most of the tribes were small, autonomous villages and not well organized into federations. The Mahican Nation, was a large group of Algonquian tribes living in the area of western Massachusetts and Vermont, and into New York as far west as the Hudson River. Being the reigning overlords of the area, the Pequots fought any group that tried to exercise any control over their newly claimed territory. Another point of confusion is the personage of Tatobam (Totobam, Tatobem) often given as another name for Sassacus. Sassacus ruled over 26 lesser sachems, some of which included the Mohegans (a subdivision of the Pequots, not to be confused with the Mahicans, from whom they had earlier descended, just east of the Hudson River), the Western Niantics, the River tribes and, at various times, some Long Island tribes. Among Woipequand's children was a daughter named Meekenump who married a Pequot War Sagamore named Oweneko. Prior to 1631, Europeans had spent little time in the Connecticut area, other than to sail along its coast. By 1634, the Pequots had still almost no direct contact with the English but were known by them to be at war with almost every surrounding tribe, and most especially with the Narragansetts and the Dutch. In 1634, a Captain John Stone of Virginia, who had sailed up the coast causing trouble everywhere he landed, was fined 100 pounds and banished from Massachusetts. In July, John Gallop, while sailing his small ship by Block Island, came across Oldham's vessel crowded with Indians and no white men to be seen. In late August, Massachusetts sent John Endicott, with ninety volunteers, to Block Island to avenge the murder of Oldham. Sassacus's main village was at Pequot Harbor, (the present towns of New London and Groton, Conn.), with a second large village about seven miles east at Mystic. The colonists were aware of the reputation the Pequots had for cruelty and knew they were in for some rough times.
Various stories are told of one Englishman, John Tilley, who was ambushed and tortured over a three day period, which included cutting off his fingers, toes, hands and feet, flaying his skin off and putting hot embers between the flesh and skin. By this time, the English were outraged by the aggressive acts of the Pequots and all three colonies agreed to unite in a war against them. Connecticut decided not to wait for the troops from the other colonies and raised an army of ninety men under Captain John Mason of Windsor. On Friday, May 19, 1637, Mason put his army on board ship and sailed east along the coast line. The next day, the ship approached Narragansett Bay, in Rhode Island, and three days later, the soldiers arrived at Miantonomoa€™s village.
After the death of Wequash, his younger brother, Cushawashet, took a form of his deceased brother's name and was thereafter known as Wequashcook (Wequashcuk.) In addition, he also took on the Christian name of Harmon Garret, (Herman Garret) by which name he is most often known in the histories.
After the conquest of the Pequots, Harmon Garret (Wequashcook), was appointed by the English to be one of the two governors over the residue of this tribe. Returning now to the Pequot War, the original goal of the army had been Sassacusa€™s main village but, coming from the east, they first approached the fortress at Mystic and Mason felt they should attack rather than risk being detected by the enemy before the battle began.
The undetected English army surrounded the fort and at dawn, on May 26th, they marched up the hill to begin the battle. Shortly after the battle was ended, Sassacus, with his main body of warriors, arrived on the scene. Munitions were low so Mason armed a strong rear guard to hold off the pursuing Indians and they headed for the ship. The invasion had been so unexpected and so devastating that the Pequots were completely demoralized.
The Connecticut troops were allowed to return home as replacements arrived from the other colonies.
To avoid being captured and killed by their Indian enemies, some of the remaining Pequots, who were still in hiding, sent messengers to Hartford to ask for leniency if they surrendered. Following the total destruction of the Pequot Nation, other New England tribes, even those which had assisted the English in this campaign, were so shocked at the total annihilation of their enemy, that many sachems, including Massasoit, sent delegations to Boston to assure the English of their friendship and to renew old treaties. Uncas, who had been the most aggressive Indian in the pursuit of his own fellow Pequots, now got his wish of becoming the Great Sachem of what was left of that people. Along the Connecticut River, and particularly in the area of present day Windsor, Hartford, Wethersfield and Middletown, were numerous, small, independent tribes referred to as the a€?River Tribesa€?. Not wanting to alienate the English, the Mohawks would not barge into a colonista€™s home uninvited. The treatment the River Indians received from the Pequots was not much better and they were compelled to pay heavy monetary tribute to both nations or suffer severe destruction. Rather than fight, Sowheag moved his people south to Middletown, where he built a fort, or castle, on the bank overlooking the River. Early in the morning of April 23rd, 1637, a small group of Wethersfield settlers was attacked by two hundred Pequot warriors, while working in a meadow on the edge of town.
Not wanting to open up more fronts in the Indian war, the colonists left Sowheag alone until the Pequot Nation was destroyed. Friendship with the English had not proven too valuable in the past and Sowheag could not see where their offer of friendship would help much now. As time past, some Pequots began to feel that the old hostilities must have been forgotten. The only known children of Sowheag are: Montowese, Sequasson, Turramuggus, and a daughter, Sepannamaw. In 1675, the court provided a 300 acre tract of land on the east side of the Connecticut River near Middletown, for the heirs of Sowheag and the Mattabeseck Indians. Sowheag's son, Montowese, was a Sachem of a smaller tribe, just north of the Quinnipiac tribe, who resided around New Haven Harbor.


During the Pequot War, some of the Massachusetts Colonists marched along the Connecticut shore pursuing Sassacus.
Montowese, and his wife, spent the remainder of their days farming on the small parcel of land which still bears his name. It is logical to assume that Noh-took-saet may well have been the son of Epenow, although there is no proof of it. The fact that the Aquiniuh Tribe either sent to the mainland for Noh-took-saet to come and be their Sachem, or that he came on his own to claim the title, seems to be good evidence that he was the rightful heir to the sachemship after the passing of Epenow. In 1675, Metaark was "challenged in his rights by the person called Omphannut, who claimed he was the eldest son of the deceased sachem.
The above described court case, between Metaark and his brother, (most likely a half-brother) occurred less than three months after the start of the King Philip War.
Over the next few years, Metaark saw the selling off of Indian lands to settlers and was quick to realize this would be devastating to the tribes.
Following the sale of their lands, the local Indians were unhappy to find themselves as tenent farmers on what had always been their own lands. This still did not satisfy the local Indians who were convinced the document was valid and not a forgery. According to Franklin Ele-wath-thum Bearce (9), Isaac Siem was a Sachem at She-co-me-co, NY., perhaps as early as the late 1600's but at least very early in the 1700a€™s. On the skeptical side one must ask: Why would the son of a Marthas Vineyard Island sachem travel all the way to She-ko-me-ko, NY to make a new home for himself? Probably the greatest indication of a tie between Siem and Marthas Vineyard Island is in the name of his two known sons, Gideon and Joshua Mauweehu (or Mauwee). In a list of his ancestors, Bearce also lists Noh-took-saet, although he does not say where, or how, he fits into the pedigree. It may be supposed that, after marrying a Pequot and a Mohegan, Isaac Siem spent much of his life in south-central Connecticut.
Gideon Mauweehu (Mauwehu, Mauwee, Ma-hu-wee-hu, Mayhew) was first known to lead a small following of Indians on the lower Housatonic River and held land around Derby. As the English began filling up this part of the valley, Gideon first moved to Newtown and then to New Milford. In 1744, the English were again at war with the French, and the conflict was extended to this side of the ocean. Colonial laws at this time forbade the purchase of Indian lands without the authorization of the colonial government. For a short time all seemed well, with the English staying on the east side of the Housatonic and the Indians on the west. Land disputes continued between the two societies for the next five years, and in 1757 Jabez Smith was chosen overseer of the tribe. In 1764 Eunice Mauwee, daughter of Joseph Mauwee, and granddaughter of Gideon Mauweehu, was born. Gideon reached an advanced age and, after serving his people well all of his life, past away sometime before 1767, probably at Scatacook. Although the band of Scatacooks continued to dwindle and move away until by 1774 there were only sixty-two remaining in Kent, it was reported that during the Revolutionary War one hundred Scatacook warriors assisted the American army by sending military messages up and down the River by means of Indian message fires and drum beats. There is another theory, however, about the origin of Chuse's name that this author would like to propose. Joseph was married to Ann Warrups (called the 2nd, to differentiate her from her aunt, Ann Warrups 1st, the daughter of Old Chicken Warrups.) Ann II was the daughter of Captain Thomas Chicken Warrups, who was a son of Old Chicken Warrups. Joseph and his family lived on the most amicable terms with the white settlers for forty-eight years in Chusetown, during which time more and more settlers took up residence in the area. At the time when Joseph travelled to Scatacook, the Indians in that area were poor, hungry, and sick.
Not long after this Joseph Mauwee arrived at Scatacook and took up his residence in his father's tribe.
The petition lists the number of males in the tribe at thirty-six, females at thirty-five, and twenty of their numbers being children of an age suitable for attending school. Sarah Mauwee, daughter of Joseph Mauwee and Ann Warrups II, was born at Chusetown (Humphreysville), Connecticut, about 1730-40. As a young woman, probably living in the Canfield home, she had a baby fathered by Oliver Canfield. Leonards in Aston-Clinton, near Dundridge, where he owned the 'Chapel Farm.' He married Sarah Bryan, early in 1620.
Saybrook and on April 23, 1637, they attacked the plantation at Wethersfield killing nine people, including one woman and a child. While we don't know his birthdate, he was old enough to have a daughter, Catherine, who married a German immigrant, John Rau, in 1721, and his oldest son, Gideon Mauweehu, was probably born about 1680-90.
Goodwin were appointed to resolve all differences and to demand that he turn over the Pequot murderers he was harboring.
One inch of ice in 3 days !!!It wasreal windy most of the day and I spent more time in the EskimoQuick Fish 3.The two holes in the shelter provided some steady action for perch and bluegills. The central region was occupied by a large number of small individual tribes referred to as the River Tribes (sometimes called Mattabesecks, because that was the name of the most dominant subtribe.) The Housatonic River Tribes (as described in Chapter 12) lived in the western part of Connecticut.
The death lull kicked in around1230 and fishing picked back up again at 3pm.I landed the usual residents of the lake-- a few trout, afew nice crappies, perch and gills. Amy (Amey) Oviatt (who was born 10 Feb 1667 as the dau of Thomas Oviatt and Frances Bryan.) Richard was a cordwainer (shoe maker). 1st Hannah Bruen 3 (30) Oct 1663, daughter of Obadiah Bruen [and a niece to his step-mother, Mary (Marie) Bruen.
The few who participated in the war usually did so on the side of the English, against their own people. Plenty ofpanfish with a few perch hitting the 9-inch mark and a crappie thatwas almost 10 inches.I caught trout sporadically throughout the day, ending with 9. Teddy told me the lake is completed covered and the ice might be about 1 inch orso.Teddy has patrolled and lived next toAntietam Lakealmostall his life and he knows the lake.
There isplenty of rainfall predicted for that area.Most of the fish sitting in the estuary should be entering the river as I type this. Anglers tend to give you space, the scenery is beautiful and the Osprey's always put on a show. Wednesday was spent in the upper fly zone and wasslow in the morning but pretty consistent in the afternoon. Ialso landed a smallmouth bass, a few small brown trout, afew small rainbows (steelhead smolts ?), a fallfishand a baby AtlanticSalmon.
The Mohawk egg pattern accounted for many smaller fish and the salmon sized Light Spruce fly produced a few hookups. Last years--One Day Trip-- hot fly,Olive bugger with White marabou tail and redcrystal flash also received plenty of attention and did account for 2 fish. The guyI was fishing withused plenty of flies with smaller bucktail flies doing most of the damage.


He didhook-up with a few fish while usingmy Death Stonefly, landing one nice Coho.I can tell you this---the next few weeks will provide some serious action.
There are fish in the system at this moment and with the water release at 1800 CFS and the rain. The pool we were fishing was loaded with suckers and chubs and I did see a few trout and a couple of nice sized smallmouth bass. Any questions as to what to tie, just shoot me an email or use the Contact 2Bonthewater page. All that cold water coming from a quarry and the creek itself in that area is near lifeless.
The bridge is now being painted a Hunter Green color.Most of the creeks in the OleyValley are really low. Even with the rain, the creeks remain very low.A I have a trip scheduled to the Salmon River planned inlate September thanks to Jack. Without Jack's kindness and awesomeness, I would not be going salmon fishing.A I have startedtyingflies for the upcoming salmon trip. Zoe competed in a National Beauty pageant and won honorable mention in the beauty competition (FYI -- Zoe wears no make-up, fake hairor fake teethand she competes in the natural division--she is my little girl and I would never DRESS HER UP like all those crazy folks you see on TV). We dressed as fishermen, answered a question about each other and then Zoe did some fly casting on stage. Zoe was crowned Little Queen when she won the Pennsylvania state pageant back in 2006 while competing in a Sunburst pageant. There are plenty of out of the way smaller streams that are teeming with Smallmouths, Carp and a variety of Panfish. Perkiomen Creek -- air temp 89 degrees, checked the temperature at two spots, temps were 70 and 69 degrees -- Taken between 415-425 pmA Manatawny Creek -- air temp was 88 degrees, checked the temperature at three spots, temps were 76 degrees at Red Covered Bridge, 74 degrees above TIKI bar and 76 degrees below the Rt.
This heatwave has made most ofthe local trout streams too warm to fishfor the catch and release angler. Maiden Creek below Ontelaunee Lake should provide anglers with some fishthat are willing to bite. You can find Carp, Smallmouth Bass, Largemouth Bassand a wide assortment of panfish to keep you busy. Take some cold water with you !!!Your best way to keep the water cool is to freeze a bottle or two of water the night before you head out.
As the day heats up, the water bottles will slowly melt, leaving you with nice cold waterto drink throughout the day. I fished for 30-minutes on Manatawny and landed 2 wild browns on a tan caddis dry fly in the area where the water temp was 68 degrees. Temperature wise, if it is 90 degrees outside, pretty sure most, if not all of the local trout waters will be at 70 degrees or higher. We don't wantto kill the trout.The trout that survive through the summer will offerus great fishing in the fall. I have not made a trip to the Schuylkill River as of yet, but I'd bet the house that the smallie action should be pretty darn good. You can also takeyour watercraft outbefore Epler atCross Keys Road or at Muhlenburg Township park which is below the PFBC Epler Access. There is little room to fish, unless you don't mind walking the shoreline that is covered with all types of vegetation, including Poison Ivy. Pleny of fish to be caught in this body of water, that is if you can get to them.A Manatawny Creek fished OK. This stretch used to provide some very nice smallmouth action, but the last few trips here have been poor.
Switched to a spent spinner pattern and hooked up twice--snapped one off and landed a nice stocker brown. The water is up from recent rains inthe valley, but the stream was clear and in perfect condition. The Schuylkill River and a few tribs shouldprovide any cat or carp angler with a few bites each nite. Channel catfish prefer dead baits andsmaller live bait, while the Flatheads prefer larger live bait. Carp will eatsmaller live bait including minnows andcrayfish along with the standard fare of homemade MUSH bait or whole kernel corn.The bottom line is--It doesn't really matter what bait you areusing. But, by now it was pitch black and it was raining pretty good and thelightning made it look like the 4th of July came early.I managed to land 2 fish on my emerger pattern androll 2 other trout.
Started out at the mouth of Sacony Creek but there was some serious bridge work going on, so I left after a few casts. Caught some nice bluegills, onebrown trout, pumpkinseeds, green sunfish, agolden shiner and I almost hooked into a very nice largemouth bass. Kids and water mean plenty of noise,lots of splashing and lots offun.Normally, 750pm is about the timethe sulphurs start popping off. I saw some Iso's and huge stoneflies coming off and flying around.I caught a trophy Bluegill, no kidding check out the picture, almost 9 inches.
I left my headlamp in the truck so I had to walkout before it got too dark and miss the potential spinner fall.
I then drove to another stretch of the crick and hooked up a few times fishing a brown spent spinner.
I lost them at the bank.A Fish the mornings with a brown or white spent spinner and you might get a few takes on the surface. My favorite is a "John's Spring Creek Pupa" tied in size 18 and 20 (Trout Flies of The East--page 93).
I caught two brookies on a CDC sulphur dry fly and the rest of the fish were caught with nymphs. What an amazing fish, especially on a 2 wt bamboo fly rod with a fly reel that is dated to the 1930's or 1940's. What a specimen.He looked like a submarine swimming in the water !!My first impression of the leviathan is that it was a wild fish. Tonights fishing provided a mixed bag of fish, a few smallwild brown trout, along with a few stocker browns, stockerrainbows and the brook trout. I topped it all off with a visit to Ted's house to show off the bamboo fly rod and talk shop. It was about 40 degrees and raining.I didroll a larger fish on a midge, but aside from that, it was a very slow night. Cast down and across and hop the flies upoff the bottom with quick upward lifts of the fly rod.The fish would really strike hard. I still have not figured out whyone day I will catch all browns, one day I will catch all rainbows and some days, you will catch a little of everything.



Does yoga help you lose weight fast
Weight loss meal plan without exercise video
Weight loss pills anxiety
Gluten free diet plans for weight loss


Comments

  1. Suner_Girl

    Are generally off for centuries had been largely.

    20.01.2014

  2. Karinoy_Bakinec

    Recipes I attempted and you who ingest.

    20.01.2014

top