12.12.2015

How to find whether a woman is virgin down,i want a girl friend phone number in kolkata 3g,relationships money advice zeer - Reviews

One thing that has been very consistent about Albert Raymond Mortona€™s documents is that he invariably listed his mothera€™s name as Ida Louise Easley. We searched for twenty-five years to find any record of this woman, other than those listed by Raymond, and were infuriatingly unsuccessfula€¦ until June 2012.
Ida Louise Easley was born in Oct 1856 (according to the 1900 census for Winslow, Navajo, AZ) in Macoupin County, Illinois. She was thirteen years old in the 1870 Federal census for Chetopa, Neosho Co., KS and still living with her parents and siblings at that time. We find her (at age 18) still residing with her siblings in the 1875 Kansas state census, in Neosho Co. In the 1880 Federal census for Lincoln, Neosho, Kansas, we find Aaron and Ida Bonham with a new set of twin boys, just a few months old, Clarence and Lawrence, born in early 1880.
At about the same time, Aaron Bonhama€™s parents had settled in Franklin Co., Kansas, about 80 miles to the north. After this time, we can find no document to indicate that Aaron Bonham was still alive, but neither can we prove that he had died. Aaron and Ida could have divorced, she then quickly married Ira Morton in the fall of 1885 (after the census) and they could have had a son, Raymond, the following year--Sept 1886.
Aaron could have been away for an extended period and Ida could have met Ira Morton and had a child out of wedlock before Aarona€™s return. Now, keeping that dilemma in mind, leta€™s proceed with the other documents that we have been able to find for Ida L. Note that at the time of this marriage, she was still going by the name of a€?Bonhama€? -- not Morton. The 1890 Federal census would have been very helpful to us here, but unfortunately, it was destroyed. We would never have thought to search for this record under the names of a€?Holmesa€? without first finding the record of her marriage--above.
In the very same year, and census, for the same county, we find that by the time the census taker had moved on to the home of Martha Bonham (the widowed mother of Aaron Bonham--and mother-in-law of Ida L.
Now, this census was just a very short time after the previous exhibit (above) but here, Ray is listed as being 10 years old, and with the surname of a€?Bonham.a€? It is the same young boy. Even though Raya€™s mother had moved west, to Arizona, Ray continued to live with Martha Bonham. The question must arise, that if Ray was born a€?out of wed-locka€? while Marthaa€™s daughter-in-law was still married to her son, Aaron, one might think that of all of the children, Ray may have been the least likely of the children for Martha Bonham to take into her home to raise. Whether Ray was actually going by the Bonham name, as indicated above, or whether the census taker once again made an assumption of that, is not known. In the 1905 KS State census we again find this family still living in Stafford Co., KS with Frank Bonham now showing as the head of the household, and Martha was still alive at age 78, but Ray is no longer living with them.
It is interesting that Ida stated that her parent were born in KY, because in prior census records she had always correctly stated they were born in Tennessee. In the 1920 Federal census for Bakersfield, Kern Co., CA we find the family still in this community.
Note that Margaret Bonham Kelly had named her oldest son, William Raymond Kelly, with his middle name being a remembrance of her younger brother, Albert Raymond Morton. We have heard that Ida Louise Easley Bonham (Morton) Holmes Hamilton passed away in Bakersfield, CA in the 1930s but we do not have a specific date for her death at this time. Note that at the time of this marriage, she was still going by the name of a€?Bonhama€? -- not Morton.A  This adds credence to the supposition that she may not have actually married Ira H.
Although there is no evidence to suggest that Herodotus included maps with his history, his ideas influenced the development of Greek cartography.
Like Homer, Herodotus includes cardinal directions and topographical landmarks: bounding Egypt beyond Heliopolis, for example, are the Mountains of Arabia, oriented north to south and the site of quarries for the building of pyramids. Scattered throughout his text is so much information about countries and rivers and seas and their relative size and position that many have tried to draw maps of Herodotusa€™ world from it.


The Persians inhabit Asia extending to the Southern Sea, which is called the ErythrA¦an [i.e.
And Asia is inhabited as far as the Indian land; but from this onwards towards the east it becomes desert, nor can anyone say what manner of land it is .
For the Nile flows from Libya and cuts Libya through the midst, and as I conjecture, judging of what is not known by that which is evident to the view, it starts at a distance from its mouth equal to that of the Ister [here Herodotus means that the source of the Nile is as far west as that of the Ister-Danube]; for the River Ister begins from the Celti and the city of Pyrene [the Pyrenees?] and so runs that it divides Europe in the midst (now the Celti are outside the Pillars of Hercules and border upon the Cynetes, who dwell furthest towards the sunset of all those who have their dwelling in Europe and the Ister ends, having its course through the whole of Europe, by flowing into the Euxine Sea at the place where the Milesians have their settlement at Istria.
For all that sea which the Hellenes navigate, and the sea beyond the Pillars, which is called Atlantis, and the ErythrA¦an Sea are in fact all one, but the Caspian is separate and lies apart by itself. And taking his seat at the temple he [Darius] gazed upon the Pontus [the Euxine], which is a sight well worth seeing. And I laugh when I see that, though many before this have drawn maps of the Earth, yet no one has set the matter forth in an intelligent way; seeing that they draw Oceanus flowing around the Earth, which is circular exactly as if drawn with compasses, and they make Asia equal in size to Europe . As mentioned above, Herodotus scoffed at the popular belief that Europe, Asia, and Africa (which he called Libya) were all the same size, and made up a circular world. Herodotus tells of five youths from the country of the Nasamones on the Gulf of Sidra, who pushed down through the desert to the south-west until they came to a great river which flowed east. Easley Bonham--the twins who died when just a few months old, and the four living children, three of which (# 1, 2 & 4) all claim that Aaron Bonham was their father, but #3 (Raymond) always claimed that his father was Ira Morton. Aaron and Ida could have divorced, she then quickly married Ira Morton in the fall of 1885 (after the census) and they could have had a son, Raymond, the following year--Sept 1886.A  We know Ira died in 1888, and Ida could have been reconciled to Aaron and remarried him with Bernice born to them in 1888. Aaron may have died in about 1884.A  Ida could have married Ira Morton in the fall of 1885 (after the census) and then had both Raymond (1886) and Bernice (1888) prior to Iraa€™s death on 12 Dec. Through his writings of travels Herodotus did much to particularly enlarge contemporary knowledge of Asia.
He particularly ridiculed circular maps that displayed landmasses symmetrically divided by the Mediterranean Sea, and he doubted the existence of the Eridanus [Po] River, from which amber was thought to originate. For example, he accepts that the continent of Libya [Africa] is almost entirely surrounded by water, excepting the Isthmus of Suez, as proved by pharaoh Necoa€™s circumnavigation of Africa (ca.
He declares, a€?In a few words I will make clear the size [of Asia and Europe] and in what manner each should be depicted.a€? He starts with Persia, delimited by the Persian Gulf and Arabia to the south. His book was intended first and foremost as the story of the Greeksa€™ long struggle with the Persian Empire, but Herodotus also included everything he has been able to find out about the geography, history, and peoples of the world. His researches for his book took him from his home in Halicarnassus in Asia Minor - the peninsula of western Asia between the Black Sea (Herodotusa€™ Pontus Euxinus) and the Mediterranean - through most of the known world. He cannot guess why three different names, Europa, Libya, Asia, have been given to the earth, which is one physical landmass unit. Now the Ister, since it flows through land which is inhabited, is known by the reports of many; but of the sources of the Nile no one can give an account, for the part of Libya through which it flows is uninhabited and desert .
They had seen crocodiles there, and so Herodotus was convinced that they had reached the Nile, which he believed to rise in West Africa.
In length it is a voyage of fifteen days if one uses oars, and in breadth, where it is broadest, a voyage of eight days. He realized that the Caspian was an inland sea and not, as many geographers thought, a gulf connected to the ocean that was supposed to encircle the earth. As he discusses lands increasingly distant from the Mediterranean, the details become scanty, and his geography of the Indus is minimal.
His work, with the map that can be reconstructed from his descriptions, provides our most detailed picture of the world known to the Greeks of the fifth century B.C. His geographical descriptions are based on the observations that he made on this journey, combined with what he learned from the people he met.
It has been suggested that the Nasamones came upon the Niger near Timbuktu, but it is more probable that they got no further than to the Fezzan, where dried-up river beds bear witness of large prehistoric rivers, and where carvings of crocodiles have been found on rock faces. On the side towards the west of this sea the Caucasus runs along by it, which is of all mountain ranges both the greatest in extent and the loftiest .
The length of it is seven thousand one hundred furlongs and the breadth, where it is broadest three thousand three hundred .


Also, he stated that Africa was surrounded by sea, and cited the Phoenician voyage commissioned by Necho in 600 B.C.
More generally, he raised several geographic questions: Why were three names (Europe, Libya, Asia) given to the earth, which is a single entity? However, given the lack of empirical evidence that the Ocean surrounds the contiguous landmasses of Europe, Libya, and Asia, he rejects this theory.
The Caspian Sea and the Araxes River delimit the extreme northeast, but east of India there is an uninhabitable desert whose topography is unknown. Nonetheless, despite his interest in geography and his unequivocal opinions regarding cartography, Herodotus utilized geography primarily to reinforce his presentation of history. Herodotus saw his surroundings far more realistically than did most of his contemporaries; sometimes he even goes to the extent of doubting the truth of a story he reports second-hand. Herodotusa€™ view of the earth was closer to our own, although, because his knowledge was limited, he described Europe as being as long as both Asia and Africa put together.
The dromedary camel was not yet in use in Africa in Herodotusa€™ days, and it is difficult to believe that the youths could have crossed the sands of the desert as far as the Niger on horseback. Giving preeminence to data gleaned from exploration and travel, Herodotus attacks cartographers who utilized only geometry.
We shall have to believe that he was familiar with theories about the sphericity of the earth, but even though he was often critical of other geographers, he nevertheless seems to have accepted the old belief of the world as a flat disc.
Of the areas to the north and east he knew little, mentioning neither Britain nor Scandinavia, and confessing ignorance of eastern Asia.
As one passes beyond the place of the midday, the Ethiopian land is that which extends furthest of all inhabited lands towards the sunset [i.e.
Some 500 years after Herodotus wrote, the geographer Claudius Ptolemy, whose knowledge was more detailed that Herodotusa€™, mistakenly pined southern Africa to Asia, making the Indian Ocean into an inland sea. Who fixed the boundary of Asia and Africa at the Nile, and that of Asia and Europe at the Phasis River?
He does not know whether Europe is surrounded by water to the west and north, nor the location of the Cassiterides Islands [Great Britain?], from which tin is obtained. This then [Asia Minor] is one of the peninsulas, and the other beginning from the land of the Persians stretches along to the ErythrA¦an Sea, including Persia and next after it Assyria, and Arabic after Assyria; and this ends, or rather is commonly supposed to end, at the Arabian Gulf [the Red Sea], into which Darius conducted a canal from the Nile . This Pontus also has a lake which has its outlet into it which lake is not much less in size than the Pontus itself, and it is called MA¦otis [the Sea of Azov] and a€?Mother of the Pontusa€™. Herodotusa€™ knowledge of the course of the Nile was, however, as hazy as of that of the Indus.
Even if he did not use maps himself, his text can still be employed to produce an outline of the oikoumene [the known inhabited world].
Thus Asia also, excepting the parts of it which are towards the rising sun, has been found to be similar to Libya [i.e. According to him, it rose south of the Atlas Mountains, and flowed across Africa before turning north to flow through Egypt toward the Mediterranean Sea.
The framework is in place: there are limits to the extent of the world and boundaries between landmasses. Although he knew that a Greek mariner called Scylax (dates unknown) had sailed down the Indus River and around Arabia into the Red Sea, Herodotus maintained that the Indus River flowed southeast. As to Europe, however, it is clearly not known by any, either as regards the parts which are towards the rising sun or those towards the north, whether it be surrounded by sea . Herodotusa€™ Arabian Gulf], one who set out from the inner most point to sail out through it into the open sea, would spend forty days upon the voyage, using oars; and with respect to breadth, where the gulf is broadest it is half a daya€™s sail across .



My external hard drive keeps disconnecting mac
Texting your ex drunk uncle
Get boyfriend to be more romantic girlfriend


Comments to How to find whether a woman is virgin down

  1. ZAYKA — 12.12.2015 at 10:19:17 Breakup, it's pure to really feel so lonely that informed me that.
  2. KINQ_BOXINQ — 12.12.2015 at 10:52:30 Guys out there who are caring, thoughtful.
  3. Akira — 12.12.2015 at 17:33:13 Blew it with, and solely after another equally Herculean.
  4. 7797 — 12.12.2015 at 11:13:33 Full and best textual content that you just're nonetheless on the opposite finish.
  5. superman — 12.12.2015 at 15:44:55 Contact he will simply permenantly exit you are nonetheless thinking about them on occasion.