How to get rid of lumps and bumps on face treatment

How to get rid of a bubble in your ear lobe use

Info

Categories

Archives

Other

How do you keep a cast iron frying pan from rusting quickly,get rid of pet smells urine,how to get rid of urine from mattress review - Try Out

Immediately on their arrival at 201 McCord, these two critters entered the food-chain, by recycling table scraps; the word recycling wasn't trendy back then, although it was in the dictionary. By the time this phase had been well established-around the first of October, Mother's fall garden was beginning to flourish. By now November was nigh with shorter cooler days and of course cooler nights; the season for serious pig fattening had arrived.
I think for me Hog Killing Day was the most memorable of all the recurring events of the year at 201 McCord. The pig-sticking was critically important, blood had to be thoroughly and quickly drained from the carcass.
In the meantime the heated water had reached just about the right temperature (just short of boiling), the tilted barrel filled to a level so that about half the carcass would be covered when it was plunged into the water. After the bristles were thoroughly removed ,the tendons to the back feet were accessed and the gantline stick, only in our case a single tree was hooked around the tendons, this implement spread-eagled the carcass and with the block-and-tackle attached to it, was easily hoisted to vertical under the gin-pole or gantry.
Now the butcher, down-stage-center, with his scalpel-sharp knife started, with the concentration and precision of a surgeon, and began to open the body cavity. Before the sides were quartered, (hams and shoulders detached) a lot of fat was trimmed off; there was a lot of it too. Now that the carcass had been dismantled, it metamorphosed into hams, shoulders, and ribs and another critically important phase started.
The salt seemed to be drawn into the meat rather quickly, and in the process a lot of water was driven out, that was the reason for the seep-tight surface of the table top.
Dad had built a big box, about two-and-a-half by three-and-a-half feet and possibly thirty inches deep with a hinged lid A‘the box was constructed for this specific purpose.
My memory gets somewhat hazy on many of the details but I have clear and vivid recollections of heaping bowls and platters of steaming-, freshly-picked string beans, corn (on and off the cob) and sliced tomatoes and onions, all in an abundance we didnA•t even think about.
As the salting-down phase was started, another very significant production got underway: processing the fat for lard, making sausage, converting the heart and liver into edible and enduring by-products, and donA•t forget the HEAD!
The operation started with a large kettle filled with this accumulation of trimmings, heated over a slow fire so that it wouldn't scorch or burn, and allowed to simmer for a long time.
These parts, heart and liver, were ground up and reduced to a single mass, then a pretty liberal amount of cornmeal was added.
Now the head and feet and many miscellaneous bones that might have some meat fragments still attached were assembled into one huge pot, enough water added to cover it all, seasoned with salt and brought to a slow boil. After this whole kettle full of stuff began to simmer along, the meat began to separate from the bones; the head still pretty much intact was a much bigger chunk and took a lot more time to cook. There is now a rather generous sized heap of cooked meat to be dealt with, most of it in small bits. In this cooking process, to separate the bone from the meat, the water that was added had been reduced to a pretty rich meat stock and now it was all added together, put into a baking pan and into the over to cook slowly until it was firm. I think that any of those Girls could spin a great story about those hot summer days when they were out there under the fig tree, peeling, pitting, and preparing the fruit, then into the steaming kitchen to get the stuff into the fruit jars, and all the neighbor kids were parading up the street in their bathing suits to go swimming in one the irrigation canals. Preface Adaline Pates Potter, known to all as Pates (pate eze) came to Mount Holyoke College from western Pennsylvania with the firm, if romantic, intention of majoring in French and joining the US Consular Service on graduation.
She blamed her inability to discipline her love of telling tales on her Kentucky father and on her mother and four siblings, all of whom were passionate readers and indulgent listeners. So I shall start with a brief outline of the Mount Holyoke College community of which we were only a part. A returning alumna trying to find the Mount Holyoke she knew in the late a€?twenties, would see much to reassure her if she drove along College Street. Yet, back of the faA§ade, the college has changed not only structurally but essentially, and one of those most essential changes is the student body. Most of us were Protestant: Congregationalist, Presbyterian, or Methodist, although there was a sprinkling of Episcopalians and Quakers. If all that lack of variety -- social, religious, and class -- made us parochial in outlook, it was also the basis for what I find the most distinguishing and influential characteristic of the college I knew: we were classless. It all happened between September 1928 and June 1929; that was a very far-off time -- sixty-seven or sixty-eight years ago, to be specific.
If Sycamores has ghosts today, I think they are not of the students I knew there, but Margaret, Nellie, and Dunk, assuming still their roles as guardians of the house. Later came the daffodils, narcissus, and hyacinths in clumps at the bases of the big trees, filling the borders, escaping somehow into the wilderness beyond the grape arbor.
Naturally, being girls still, we did not confine our reaction to the garden to aesthetic raptures. Having chosen Sycamores for its eighteenth-century charm, we tried to furnish our rooms in the spirit of the house, at least in so far as our not very knowledgeable taste, our pocketbooks, and our comfort allowed. We had the southwest room at the top of the stairs on the second floor, the one with its own dogleg staircase leading to a locked door on the third floor.
We tried to make the double desk, again college-issue, as inconspicuous as possibly by setting it to the left of the door; at least, it didna€™t strike the eye as one entered.
In the fall of 1971 or a€?72, the Dean of Students office, faced with a shortage of rooms for an unexpectedly large freshman classand having on its hands an empty Sycamores -- if a really old house so full of memories can ever be called a€?emptya€? -- decided to move foreign students from Dickinson, where most of those on the graduate level had been housed for at least twenty years, to Sycamores; that is, from the extreme south end of campus to the even more extreme north.
As foreign student adviserI was worried about the change, but since I had been presented with a fait accompli, I had no opportunity to raise the questions that troubled me. I must confess that it worked out fairly well, though the difficulties Ia€™d predicted did arise.
Despite their initial disappointment, they began to accept the situation, and gave in gracefully, or at least, not too plaintively, as they fell into the rhythms of their adopted life. Second semester had begun, everyone had returned, somewhat gratefully, to the safety of campus after the confusing scramble of Christmas vacation, and everyone had settled in nicely, I thought. So she went off with the key and it was so effective that Miss Lyon returned to wherever she had walked in my day, and never turned up at Sycamores again. Our relationship with our Head of Hall was fairly close, but our meetings usually took place at meals, in the halls, or in our own rooms, though Evelyn Ladd, as House President, probably saw more of her than I was aware of. We knew, of the room itself, that one whole wall was white-painted paneling with a fireplace, and that it was fitted up like a sitting room, with chairs and a cot, of the sort we students had, with a serviceable dark green couch-cover.
This juxtaposition of bathroom and Miss Dunklee was at the heart of one of our more dramatic experiences that winter. My memory may be wrong: it couldna€™t have been more than a healthy trickle, though a reprehensible one, after all. Still there were, there had to be, lapses; further disappointments for Miss Dunklee, though none so serious as the bath episode.
Whatever the reason for our unease, an evening came when we feared that the sheer numbers of our small infractions had accomplished what one serious carelessness had failed to do: discouraged Dunk irrevocably.
She smiled benignly, went into her room, and shut the door, leaving us to trail upstairs feeling, if truth must be told, a little flat. The name a€?Sycamoresa€? brings up memories of one of the happiest years of my College life. I wish I could recall when we first had Sycamoresa€™ Delight, and I wish I could say that it was something Escoffier would have risked his life for. Since ordinary dates were usually confined to weekends, a week day was chosen for this occasion, in order to highlight the glory. Meanwhile, the two young lady dates, having got themselves dressed for an evening out, were lurking on the second floor at the top of the stairs. About the other, I can be more sure and detailed, though the 1931 Llamarada, placing that wintera€™s Llamie Dance in late October, shakes my certainty about the background.
There was much good-natured chaffing as each date boasted of his prowess as a trencherman and vowed to add his name to the list. Feminine modesty required observance of two conflicting dicta: one did not interfere with the innocent pleasures of onea€™s date, and one did not allow notoriety, especially if there was any danger that it might be accompanied by public ridicule. Friday nights, Saturdays, and Sundays differed somewhat from class days, and greatly and crucially from the present weekends.
Within that routine, there were, naturally, variations, sometimes worthy to my nostalgic mind of treatment in some detail, sometimes very minor but insisting on a brief notice. Some of our elders, and some of the more conventional of us, must have thought there were other, more dangerous flames that year, for 1929 was an election year and, though the Republican Herbert Hoover became president that fall, despite my own staunch adherence to the Democratic party, radical criticism, even some talk of listening to the demands of a€?those unionsa€?, was in the air. For the most part, though, our interests and activities were confined to college and, more specifically, the dorm.
Such long walks were common for us in spite of the skirts we still wore everywhere, but they tended to be informal.
Some of our walking was less healthy that sophomore year than Outing Club hiking; the fall of 1928 saw the Administrationa€™s capitulation to the Campus cigarette lobby.
In those days, one of the entertainment glories of the Connecticut Valley was the Court Square Theater in Springfield.
One incident that really had nothing to do with Sycamores but certainly lent flavor to our lives there, took place during the winter.
A function of Jeanette Marksa€™s Play Shop was to lend its expertise to the foreign language departments when they put on their annual plays.


More connected to Sycamores was one more of these passing events, small in itself but important to the participants; in this case, to me.
Sophomore year, as Ia€™ve said, was the year a class began to define itself as a part of the college community. Each class inherited its color -- red or blue, green or yellow -- and its heraldic emblem -- lion or Pegasus, griffin or Sphinx -- but the song had to be original. End of an extraordinarily satisfying year for seventeen sophomores and for one -- yes, I really do believe it -- often distraught head-resident. The only explanation I can advance for such an uncharacteristic omission is that this was a a€?middlea€? college year, merely the end of a dormitory, not the end of college. Nevertheless -- here the story-teller gives a shout of triumph -- I do remember most fondly and with a little hindsight embarrassment one event that might be described as a climax of sorts: Dunka€™s final attempt to give pleasure to a€?her housea€?.
I cana€™t say whether I had an exam that morning, but I do recall the late May flowers and fragrance and our great pleasure when Dunk told us as we assembled for lunch that we were to have a picnic in the garden. The cup was not quite full, however: no food had appeared and Evelyn Ladd, the designated hostess, was missing. Miss Dunklee, mindful of the passing time and Miss Greena€™s inexorable schedule, reluctantly took care of the first problem, giving away the second part of her secret: the food was to be hunted for. The food was laid out on the tables, our plates were piled very high; Miss Dunklee and Mr.
Someone else was sent, like Sister Anne in the Bluebeard story, to see whether a laggard Evelyn was even so belatedly wandering down the road from the college.
At about five oa€™clock that afternoon Evelyn turned up, exhausted but jubilant that the questions on the exam she had just taken had called forth her best. I find it hard to accept that the sophomores I have been writing about and whom I can see so clearly are now in their mid-eighties, elderly women by anyonea€™s standards. PrefaceA  Adaline Pates Potter, known to all as Pates (pate eze) came to Mount Holyoke College from western Pennsylvania with the firm, if romantic, intention of majoring in French and joining the US Consular Service on graduation. A A A  She blamed her inability to discipline her love of telling tales on her Kentucky father and on her mother and four siblings, all of whom were passionate readers and indulgent listeners.
We were an astonishingly homogenous group.A  Almost all of us were middle-class and Protestant and came from east of the Rockies, and most of those, from the Atlantic coastal states north of the Mason-Dixon line.
Yet, back of the faA§ade, the college has changed not only structurally but essentially, and one of those most essential changes is the student body.A  As Ia€™ve said, the student body was almost ridiculously homogeneous. Am I the first to be brave enough to comment on this?OK, so someone is pulling my chain, right?
Most bannocks are kept pretty plain, which is cool and all but I wanted a little more flava.
Blend mixture together, then add garlic and herbs, mix with your hands to bring everything evenly together. Cook in frying pan for 10 minutes, flip with large spatula and cook for another 10 minutes or until golden brown.
I will totally keep this in mind when I want some cool bread and have little time to make it… do you recommend using a non-stick pan for it? I used a cast iron pan but a non-stick would be great if you wanted to use a small amount of oil.
Can I just say that I LOVE that you adapted a Parks Canada recipe, for some reason I find that really funny. March 18, 2016 by Leigh Anne 1 Comment When a chocolate craving hits, this chocolate, nutella & toffee brownie skillet is guaranteed to do the job! So when you put chocolate and a cast iron skillet together you come out with Chocolate, Nutella, Toffee Brownie Skillet. The cast iron pan gives you a nice crisp edge to your brownies and nice soft, gooey center. The only thing that would have made this better would have been a nice scoop of vanilla ice cream. A mom, wife, and blogger who uses her vision, creativity, and time management skills to inspire women to create the life they want while discovering the pretty and delicious in life. How clean types electric gas ovens, Whether your oven is traditional or convection, has a self cleaning cycle, steam cleaning mode or needs manual cleaning, there are rules about how to clean. How clean oven window glass - anna, Since writing the post on how to clean the oven, i have received so many questions about how to clean between oven window glass, so today i am finally posting a.
Since they had been weaned, they were called shoats (remember that if you are ever in a Trivial Pursuit game). When they arrived they were maybe ten or twelve inches high and twenty inches long; more or less. Beets, turnips, mustard-greens, spinach, and other stuff I can't remember, except one leafy greens plant called RAPE, ( I'm told it is grown extensively in the northern planes of the mid-continent for the oil extracted from it's seed).
The butcher's skill at locating and severing the main artery from the head to the heart verified first thing his claim to competency. Now strong backs and hands thrust this object that was rapidly being transformed from pig to pork into the very hot water, one end at a time of course, and if you got a good scald, the bristles slipped off easily with diligent application of the scraper, but clearing the head and ears of bristles and hair was a tedious chore to say the least, but the processing of this particular item, was an even more daunting task. Us kids looked on with near hypnotic stares as the mysteries of a pig's viscera began to be revealed. With the shoulders and hams off, the backbone was separated from the ribs, again with a butcherA­s saw. It was about five feet long and maybe thirty inches wide, had a tongue-and-grove pine top to forestall seeping (plywood was not available then).
The process started with a layer of shelled corn, two or three inches deep, then the meat (one layer), then another layer of corn and so on. In the trimming of the various parts, there was quite a lot of lean scraps accumulated and they were saved for sausage.
It seemed like there were always a few people around that had their own special formula that they wanted to pass on.
First, this big pile of ground meat was changed to a big pile of rolled balls; not as big as a golf ball, maybe a little more than an inch in diameter.
This is where the livermush label came from I supposeA‘then a generous allowance of salt and pepper and enough water was added to about the consistency of heavy pancake batter and this was poured into a large casserole-type pan and baked in the oven until it was firm. The eyes have been removed and disposed of - - oh yes, I forgot the tongue -- I believe it had been relegated to the livermush mass.
I never did adjust to chewing on those bits of gristle that I still recognized as snout and ear. Dad had built a lot of shelves down there, and I remember the snug secure feeling when we saw those shelves all loaded with those Mason jars filled with all manner of the past yearA•s bounty.
She hastily switched to an English major when she learned that Consuls are expected to have at least a rudimentary knowledge of economics, however, she did take as many courses in government and political science as the college then offered. Dedicated smokers now snatched a fugitive drag in dormitory rooms, with all the consequent flurry of suddenly flung-open windows and frantic waving of towels if someone in authority approached. Lovell freely, to take us to the Court Square, and to Springfield at the beginning of vacations. Woolley Hall, the Rockies, Skinner, the Mary Lyon gates, Mary Lyon itself, the libe, and Dwight have altered their front elevations so little, or so subtly, that she might even overlook the new link between the libe and what she knew as the a€?art buildinga€?. I have just stumbled on this web site and was finding things very interesting until I chanced upon this three kilo monstrosity.To describe this abomination as a pizza is a travesty. It’s not like I never get to see my parents but being that they still live all the way over in Newfoundland, I don’t get to spend time with them as often as I’d like.
We need styles that are quick and easy to maintain without having to wake up at the break of dawn every morning to get it right. By late August, they had almost doubled in size and were ready to move on to a more pampered phase of their brief life.
These rape greens were kinda favored at our table, so there was a good-sized area reserved for this particular veggie, and besides the pigs liked them; especially after Dad started baking them a bran bread, with the rape cooked in ( he had acquired a small wood stove with an oven, and did his cooking outside). That generous-sized feed trough came into itA­s own, with the water trough right there, it wasn't many days until they just sort of hunkered down on their sterns pivoting from feed trough to water trough and back. The procedure was a layer of salt first, maybe a half inch thick, then the slab of side-meat covered completely with salt, then the other slab, again liberally covered with salt, then the two shoulders and the two hams, none of the pieces touching, all separated by a layer of salt. There were no spots that were not covered; this kept any aggressive flies or any predatory germs or bugs at bay. The shelled corn was totally dry and the kernels provided enough air-space to keep the temperature constant in the mid-sixty range.
I donA•t remember the quantities by volume or weight, but I do remember what seemed to me dozens of two-quart Mason jars filled with that vital ingredientA‘lard. From this container the liquid (lard) was poured into the afore mentioned jars and the jars were capped; this very hot liquid created a partial vacuum when it cooled, making a secure seal.
Barbecued ribs were not on the agenda back then so there was lean meat trimmed from them and because sausage was such a favorite much of the loin was chosen also. My memory of the making of this particular product is very vague, might be because I never cared for it.


At first glance, this doesnA•t appear to be such a daunting task, but next time you go to the fair, when you pass by the 4-H pigs, take a close look at the critters ears!!
Of course they had all the hair removed too, as well as the horny part -- I suppose we would call it the hoof. Now the snout and the ears are very different from the rest of the pigA•s connective tissueA‘cartilaginous I guess you would say -- they survived this prolonged stewing pretty much intact. Peaches, apricots, tomatoes, string beans, pears, plums, black berries and not forgetting all the varieties of jam and jelly, and then all the great preserved pork products.
After graduation at the height of the a€?Great Depressiona€?, she spent four years in Northampton, Massachusetts, as a governess, finishing that period with an M.A. This wartime work led her to return to the Mount Holyoke English department, as a teacher of English as a foreign language and of composition.
Could I take a guess that from the imperial amounts given, this is post is proof there is an American on planet Earth with a sense of humour, and that thisparticular joker is having a lend of us all?
It’s also nice to be in your late 20’s and have your mom ask you what you want for dinner, she even asked me to  pick out some of my favorite recipes! I’m so happy I rediscovered bannock, not just because you can throw whatever you want into it and have it turn out but because it’s the easiest and fastest thing in the world to make. I love working with women and helping to inspire them to achieve their goals and dreams while still maintaining motherhood and family as their number one priority.
Barrows are castrated male pigs and these were Dad's preferences over the gilts, another term for young female pigs.
Their quarters were improved and their diet upgraded, the skim-milk and table scraps still held, but more grain and bran were added. This product, steaming from his oven, looked and smelled as tempting as any oven-baked bread ever did, and even if it was pig feed I think all of us kids pinched off a sample more than once. The phrase bleeding like a stuck hog always seemed too graphic for me after my first witnessing of a pig killing. There was a lot of leaf fat attached to the various parts, and it was carefully trimmed away and saved to be rendered with the rest of the fat that would accumulate by the time the job of butchering was done. The tenderloin was separated from the remains of the backbone and the backbone cut up into small chunks and some of these were fixed for supper. Freshly butchered meat will spoil quickly if it isnA•t refrigerated or as in our circumstances, salted. After some twelve hours or so the absorbing pretty much stopped, then whatever liquid that had been drawn out slowly evaporated. It all lasted with no spoiling or bugs or any other noxious elements until it was used up, well into the summer. As I remember there was a big round dishpan, twenty inches or more in diameter that was heaped high by the time the trimming for sausage was finished. Now came the seasoning, a simpler formula than that used for the sausage - - mostly pepper as I remember. In 1960 the position of foreign student advisor was added.A  She retired as Associate Professor of English and died in 2006. There was just no way we could have a sweet version and neglect the savory and besides, I needed something to dip in the soup I’ll be posting about tomorrow. I blog about everything I enjoy – creating treats and meals in my kitchen, spending time in my garden, entertaining and party planning, reading, self improvement and tips and ideas on style and fashion. It must have been stronger than the 2% that we are familiar with today; you couldn't see through it anyhow.
Where they previously had free run of the barnyard, the new quarters confined them to an approximately eight-foot-square wood floored pen. Needless to say, I do believe the pigs notched their happiness level up another peg or two with this additional refinement to their fare. The heart, liver, and kidneys, were separated from this mass and set aside, the lungs and stomach were relegated to the offal tub with the rest of the stuff. Ah yes I remember so well those tasty bits of meat-seasoned and cooked so artfully, floating around in pure grease in the serving bowl; tell it not in Gath!! It was necessary to turn the parts occasionally to make sure none of it was laying in this accumulated liquid. This magic mix (seasoning) was blended by hand into the meat until it was evenly dispersed. And then study all the clefts and crevasses that contribute to the make up of the creatures physiognomy -- quite hirsute. Granny, in her diligence and near fanaticism for keeping things clean and sanitary, wouldnA•t let anyone off until it was all clean and spotless. At Northfield she was given permission to marry Gordon Potter; her employment was terminated two years later, on the grounds that, as a married woman, she would be unlikely to stay in the school into an old age. Yet here it was, our home for some nine months, and a home we had chosen for ourselves when low room-choosing numbers allowed the choice. At Northfield she was given permission to marryA  Gordon Potter; her employment was terminated two years later, on the grounds that, as a married woman, she would be unlikely to stay in the school into an old age. This on the other hand look like it was constructed with the aid of a cement mixer and a bricklayer's trowel.Please take it down, there is no room for this on a serious site like this, What the hell! Maybe  I’ll even convince her to help me out with some Canadian fare while she’s here, or maybe she’ll indulge me and make some bannock, I mean, who doesn’t love bannock? I decided to go a more traditional route this time and fry the bread, it seems to be how most people cook it nowadays, kind of like toutons…the same but different. It comes together and cooks much quicker than most biscuits or quickbreads, so it’s just the thing to make when you need something for soup dunking but don’t want to wait a long time.
Also Dad liked to enhance their rations occasionally with a little helping of bran or corn. A generous sized feed trough and a water trough took two sides of one corner so their running-around space was considerably diminished. Dad didn't think he had the competency to do the actual butchering, but there was always a volunteer who claimed to have the necessary skill. Some people saved the small intestine to use for sausage casing, and I've been told chitlins and collard greens are high on the list of favorite soul food in some circles; not so in ours.
After an extended period, maybe two or three weeks, the curing was completed and ready for storage. Many of us remember her nimble fingers mixing her biscuit doughA‘she use the same technique with the sausage.
It’s also kind of nice to be able to make an entire meal without having to turn on the oven, something I’m going to keep in mind when summer makes its way back here and the thought of turning on the oven makes we want to run out the door and swan dive into the nearest river. I thought the herbs and garlic I added were the perfect amount, but you can adjust the recipe however you see fit. I doubt that concern for their emotional state was considered at all; except as everybody knows, happy pigs are healthy pigs, and they were that for sure. As far as I could tell though, their happiness level didn't decline with the change; the diet upgrade might have even raised it a notch or two.
Sometimes, I suppose they had reached satiation; they just lay down en route and napped for a while. He procured an Italian butcher who did all the butchering in exchange for the internal organs which our family didn't want to eat. With this phase done, the head was removed and set aside for later processing, and the carcass was split in half with a butcher's saw down the center of the backbone. You must remember, this was years, yes-even generations before the Diet Police came into ascendency.
These crops lasted almost all summer and they were always seasoned with salt pork from the last winter's butchering. It had been thoroughly cleaned of any residuals of course beforehand and it took an hour or better to get the water up to the right temp. While waiting, the theater for the event was prepared; a shallow hole, maybe twelve inches deep was dug with one side sloped up.
Right in front of the open end of this barrel a very low sort of table-platform was put in place. Adjacent to this area there had to be some sort of a gantry, stout and stable enough to hoist and hold a two-hundred-fifty pound plus or minus carcass.
This was the part that Dad couldn't handle, he was always otherwise engaged at this particular instant, but he reappeared quickly and the fascinating (to me at least) event was underway.



Natural remedies for clean and glowing skin
How to get rid of yeast infection at home fast exercises
How do i get rid of bad breath for good
05.01.2014, author: admin


Comments to «How do you keep a cast iron frying pan from rusting quickly»

  1. Lady_Sexy writes:
    Cures for herpes sores from are those that trigger the herpes years, and then discover.
  2. BARIS writes:
    These days, foscarnet has been proven to be effective in herpes treatment, however.
  3. crazy_girl writes:
    And tender, swollen glands within the infection before.