Best free dating sites for young adults yahoo,bauer supreme one.8 jr hockey skates,how to make a template on powerpoint,free email address validation tool - Plans Download

Currently the Mayor of London, he previously served as the Member of Parliament for Henley-on-Thames and as editor of The Spectator magazine. Johnson was educated at the European School of Brussels, Ashdown House School, Eton College and Balliol College, Oxford, where he read Literae Humaniores. On his father's side Johnson is a great-grandson of Ali Kemal Bey, a liberal Turkish journalist and the interior minister in the government of Damat Ferid Pasha, Grand Vizier of the Ottoman Empire, who was murdered during the Turkish War of Independence.[5] During World War I, Boris's grandfather and great aunt were recognised as British subjects and took their grandmother's maiden name of Johnson.
Try as I might, I could not look at an overhead projection of a growth profit matrix, and stay conscious. He wrote an autobiographical account of his experience of the 2001 election campaign Friends, Voters, Countrymen: Jottings on the Stump. Johnson is a popular historian and his first documentary series, The Dream of Rome, comparing the Roman Empire and the modern-day European Union, was broadcast in 2006.
After being elected mayor, he announced that he would be resuming his weekly column for The Daily Telegraph. After having been defeated in Clwyd South in the 1997 general election, Johnson was elected MP for Henley, succeeding Michael Heseltine, in the 2001 General Election.
He was appointed Shadow Minister for Higher Education on 9 December 2005 by new Conservative Leader David Cameron, and resigned as editor of The Spectator soon afterwards. A report in The Times[22] stated that Cameron regarded the possible affair as a private matter, and that Johnson would not lose his job over it.
The Conservative Party hired Australian election strategist Lynton Crosby to run Johnson's campaign.
Johnson pledged to introduce new Routemaster-derived buses to replace the city's fleet of articulated buses if elected Mayor.
I believe Londoners should have a greater say on how their city is run, more information on how decisions are made and details on how City Hall money is spent.
Ken Livingstone presides over a budget of more than ?10billion and demands ?311 per year from the average taxpaying household in London.
Under my Mayoralty I am certain that London will be judged as a civilised place; a city that cares for and acknowledges its older citizens. The Mayor’s biggest area of responsibility is transport, and I intend to put the commuter first by introducing policies that will first and foremost make journeys faster and more reliable. In 1992, the Discovery year for all those connected to the American continents - North, Central and South - world Jewry was concerned with commemorating not only the expulsion, but also seven centuries of the Jewish life in Spain, flourishing under Muslim rule, and the 500th anniversary of the official welcome extended by the Ottoman Empire in 1492. This humanitarianism demonstrated at that time, was consistent with the beneficence and goodwill traditionally displayed by the Turkish government and people towards those of different creeds, cultures and backgrunds. A History Predating 1492 The history of the Jews in Anatolia started many centuries before the migration of Sephardic Jews. When Mehmet II "the Conqueror" took Constantinople in 1453, he encountered an oppressed Romaniot (Byzantine) Jewish community which welcomed him with enthusiasm. A Haven for Sephardic Jews Sultan Bayazid II's offer of refuge gave new hope to the persecuted Sephardim. The arrival of the Sephardim altered the structure of the community and the original group of Romaniote Jews was totally absorbed.
Over the centuries an increasing number of European Jews, escaping persecution in their native countries, settled in the Ottoman Empire.
Under Ottoman tradition, each non-Muslim religious community was responsible for its own institutions, including schools. Recognized in 1923 by the Treaty of Lausanne as a fully independent state within its present day borders, Turkey accorded minority rights to the three principal non-Muslim religious minorities and permitted them to carry on with their own schools, social institutions and funds.
A Community Calendar (Halila) is published by the Chief Rabbinate every year and distributed free of charge to all those who have paid their dues (Kisba) to the welfare bodies. Social clubs containing libraries, cultural and sports facilities, discotheques give young people the chance to meet. The Jewish Community is of course a very small group in Turkey today, considering that the total population - 99% Muslim - exceeds 67 million. 1492 Sultan Bayezid II welcomes Jews fleeing the Spanish inquisition; in Istanbul , the Jewish population double and Salonika becomes a major Jewish centre. 1516 - 1517 The Ottoman conquest of Palestine and Egypt leads to the strengthening of Jewish communities in their ancient homeland of Eretz Israel. 1535 Approximately 56,000 Jewish live in Istanbul,1556 Sultan Suleyman ' the Magnificent' write a letter to Pope Paul IV asking for immediate release of the Ancona Conversos whom he declared to be Ottoman citizens.
1922-23 Hayim Nahum Turkey's Chief Rabbi is an adviser to the Turkish delegation to the Lausanne Conference.1923 The Turkish Republic is founded under the preseidency of Mustafa Kemal ATATURK . 1940s Turkey stays neutral in World War II,,1942 Wealth tax ( varlA±k vergisi ) places a disproportionately heavy burden on non Muslim communities and sets off a massive migration of Jews to Palestine . ISTANBUL,After the Turkish conquest of Constantinople in1453 , Sultan Mehmet II ( the Conqueor 1451-1481 ) encouraged immigration to repopulate the city.
Senguler Tourism a member of Association of Turkish Travel Agencies,ISTANBUL JEWISH HERITAGE TOURS,jewish tours in istanbul,jewish heritage tours in istanbul turkey,hakan hacibekiroglu,Welcome to our IJHT web site.. On the midnight of August 2nd 1492, when Columbus embarked on what would become his most famous expedition to the New World, his fleet departed from the relatively unknown seaport of Palos because the shipping lanes of Cadiz and Seville were clogged with Sephardic Jews expelled from Spain by the Edict of Queen Isabella and King Ferdinand of Spain. In the faraway Ottoman Empire, one ruler extended an immediate welcome to the persecuted Jews of Spain, the Sephardim. In 1992, the Discovery year for all those connected to the American continents - North, Central and South - world Jewry was concerned with commemorating not only the expulsion, but also seven centuries of the Jewish life in Spain, flourishing under Muslim rule, and the 500th anniversary of the official welcome extended by the Ottoman Empire in 1492. This humanitarianism demonstrated at that time, was consistent with the beneficence and goodwill traditionally displayed by the Turkish government and people towards those of different creeds, cultures and backgrounds. In 1992, Turkish Jewry celebrated not only the anniversary of this gracious welcome, but also the remarkable spirit of tolerance and acceptance which has characterized the whole Jewish experience in Turkey. The history of the Jews in Anatolia started many centuries before the migration of Sephardic Jews. Jewish communities in Anatolia flourished and continued to prosper through the Turkish conquest. Early in the 14th century, when the Ottomans had established their capital at Edirne, Jews from Europe, including Karaites, migrated there. The arrival of the Sephardim altered the structure of the community and the original group of Romaniote Jews was totally absorbed.
Over the centuries an increasing number of European Jews, escaping persecution in their native countries, settled in the Ottoman Empire.
For 300 years following the expulsion, the prosperity and creativity of the Ottoman Jews rivalled that of the Golden Age of Spain. Most of the court physicians were Jews: Hakim Yakoub, Joseph and Moshe Hamon, Daniel Fonseca, Gabriel Buenaventura to name only very few.
One of the most significant innovations that Jews brought to the Ottoman Empire was the printing press. Under Ottoman tradition, each non-Muslim religious community was responsible for its own institutions, including schools.
An important event in the life of Ottoman Jews in the 17th century was the schism led by Sabetay Sevi, the pseudo Messiah who lived in Izmir and later adopted Islam with his followers.
Efforts at reform of the Ottoman Empire led to the proclamation of the Hatt-A± Humayun in 1856, which made all Ottoman citizens, Muslim and non-Muslim alike, equal under the law.
Recognized in 1923 by the Treaty of Lausanne as a fully independent state within its present day borders, Turkey accorded minority rights to the three principal non-Muslim religious minorities and permitted them to carry on with their own schools, social institutions and funds. Turkish Jews are legally represented, as they have been for many centuries, by the Hahambasi, the Chief Rabbi.
Most Jewish children attend state schools or private Turkish or foreign language schools, and many are enrolled in the universities.
While younger Jews speak Turkish as their native language, the over-70-years-old generation is more at home speaking in French or Judeo-Spanish (Ladino).
A Community Calendar (Halila) is published by the Chief Rabbinate every year and distributed free of charge to all those who have paid their dues (Kisba) to the welfare bodies. Two Jewish hospitals, the 98 bed Or-Ahayim in Istanbul and the 22 bed KaratasHospital in Izmir, serve the Community. Social clubs containing libraries, cultural and sports facilities, discotheques give young people the chance to meet. The Jewish Community is of course a very small group in Turkey today, considering that the total population - 99% Muslim - exceeds 67 million.
The Santa Fe River valley was used by all peoples who entered the area and an important concentration of thousands of ancient petroglyphs are found along a volcanic escarpment formed by lava. San Felipe is one of the most culturally conservative of all the Keresan speaking tribes and passionately retains their traditional religion and customs despite relentless pressures from the outside world.
Join Southwest Seminars and David Grant Noble for an archaeological journey on the scenic Yampa and Green Rivers through Dinosaur National Monument.
Trip Description: Meeting in Vernal, Utah on May 20, we will visit the Dry Fork Creek Petroglyphs near Vernal, one of the most famous rock art sites in the Southwest.
In Echo Park wea€™ll hike to two Fremont petroglyph panels and along the way cool off in Whispering Cave. On our final day, wea€™ll emerge from the canyons for a leisurely float through Rainbow Park followed by an exciting ride through Split Mountain and its series of rapids. Santa Anaa€™s original location is unknown as all the members of the Pueblo either left or were killed during the Pueblo Revolt of 1680. Join Southwest Seminars for the experience of a lifetime led by Geologist Wayne Ranney, author of a€? Carving Grand Canyona€? and featuring 7 days rafting the Colorado River through the legendary Grand Canyon and 7 nights camping under the stars. Learn the story revealed in the thick sequence and variety of rocks exposed in the walls of the canyon which provide a record of the Paleozoic Era (550-250 million years ago). Wayne Ranney is the author of a€?Carving Grand Canyona€? and a€?Ancient Landscapes of the Colorado Plateaua€?, which he co-authored with Ron Blakey.
Trip Details: The trip will be in 37 foot motored raft as they are the preferred mode of transportation for this kind of river excursion by Wayne, being more comfortable and safer for this kind of expedition.
Enter Grand Canyon and within the first few miles begin our descent though the geologic layers, traveling 78 miles by river to the bottom of this great stack of rocks. Float deeper into the Marble Canyon section of the river and see lush green spring of Vaseya€™s Paradise stopping at Redwall Cavern, a vast alcove that J.W. The canyon is truly Grand Canyon as we float downstream to the turquoise blue waters of the Little Colorado River, the spiritual birthplace of the Hopi Fourth World. Raft the notorious Lava Falls in the depths of the Grand Canyon near the end of our journey.
Arriving at Whitmore Wash, we board a helicopter for a scenic flight out of the canyon, followed by charter flight returning us to Marble Canyon for farewell dinner with Wayne and those often dreamt about beds. We have learned more about the Coronado Expedition in the past 25 years than has been pieced together in a century of prior work. Located on Ute Mountain tribal lands, this park was a 1911 compromise: between the United States taking tribal lands and the visionary leadership of Jack House, son of the Ute Chief Acowitz, who in the 1880a€™s tipped off the legendary Wetherill brothers to the existence of fantastic ancient Pueblo sites in Lion and Johnson Canyons in the Southwest.
Step back in time to the late 19th century as we ride the train from Lamy, to Las Vegas, NM on the tracks of the old Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad to visit three historic hotels: Castaneda, Plaza, and Montezuma. Join us for a special visit to San Ildefonso Pueblo, one of the best-known New Mexico Pueblos because of the famous black-on-black pottery, which originated there and was revived in the1920s. Join Alan Osborne and attend Candelaria Day festivities at both San Felipe and Santo Domingo Pueblos, both Eastern Keres villages on the banks of the Rio Grande, where traditional and culture are closely held and tenaciously kept. We have been invited to the Acoma Sky City Governora€™s Feast Day where we will feast at the home of the governor and his family and witness celebratory observances of this important event where tribal members renew their culture, language and native religion.
The juxtaposition of young lava and old sandstone makes for a wonderful geologic setting and story.
When sixteenth-century Spanish explorers first set foot in what is now Arizona and New Mexico, they encountered people who lived in large multistory apartment buildings of stone and adobe enclosing communal plazas. Join John Ware, Porter Swentzell (Santa Clara), and Connie Eichstaedt for a seven day tour of the Ancestral Pueblo world to visit the sites highlighted in Warea€™s new book from the SAR Press, A Pueblo Social History.
Our 3-day 2-night visit will be centered at the Chaco National Park campground, where our outfitters will provide a luxury and restful camping experience, including catered delicious food and shelter on-site under the stars and the night skya€™s pantheon of other heavenly bodies. Eighteen giant calderas, or a€?supervolcanoesa€?, erupted in southwestern Colorado between 30-25 million years ago, forming much of the modern San Juan Mountains. Visit an early 18th Century Comanche camp, a site which encompasses where lodges were erected as well as ritual sacred areas beyond the dwellings. Journey to sacred sites in northern New Mexico, which are spiritually significant to different traditions, which have made a mark on New Mexicoa€™s cultural and religious landscape. This excursion will visit the remote site of Tsipinga€™uinge, an ancestral Tewa village on the northwest edge of the Tewa world. Attend the Jemez Pueblo feast day dances and witness an age-old religious ceremony, one of the only occasions outsiders may visit the Jemez Pueblo village of Wallatowa.
Following our cultural orientation we will drive to the village of Santo Domingo for the occasion and spend the balance of the day watching the dances and ceremonial activities.
Frontiers a€?the leading edges of contact and change between culturesa€? and boundaries are important because they recognize that social systems are open and provide perspective on the more intensely studied central places, such as Chaco Canyon, Mesa Verde, and the Mimbres River. This important cultural area embraces the entirety of the Rio Alamosa drainage, from its headwaters at the Plains of San Agustin to its mouth on the Rio Grande including its tributary drainages and was the home of Ancestral Puebloans for more than 800 years.
What could be better than a spring float down the mighty San Juan River, legendary cultural resource in the heart of the Four Corners region? Our expedition outfitter is Wild Rivers Expeditions with its staff of expert and well-informed river guides, who tell the local stories, row the rafts and prepare all our river meals, and also furnish our camping equipment and supplies. After a hearty breakfast on Thursday, we will board our rafts for a 3-day float down the San Juan River.
Float through the fabulous Upper Canyon of the San Juan with its stunning geologic formations and fascinating stop to see fossils. Includes 3 full days of floating and 2 nights of camping on the river, 2 nights lodging at Desert Rose Inn, (the evenings before and after the raft trip), with tents, and sleeping bags for the camping nights. Laguna Pueblo is seen by literally thousands of travelers who pass along Interstate 25 heading west of Albuquerque, but few are aware of its history, legacy, or traditions. The next morning, we drive to Bisti Badlands area, where we will marvel at the hauntingly beautiful scenery and enjoy a (requiring good walkers) 4-mile round-trip hike on relatively flat grounda€¦a gourmet picnic luncha€¦followed by more spectacular scenery and outdoor geology classes as Dr. Nestled between the Sangre de Cristo Mountains and the Sandia Mountains, While much attention has been given to the important archaeology of the Galisteo Basin, much less has of the public interest has been devoted to the geology of this rich resource area, until oil and gas exploration was proposed recently before our Governor imposed an important moratorium on extraction industries in this beautiful area just south and east of Santa Fe located along the Rio Galisteo. El Malpais National Monument offers many learning opportunities for us, including a presentation by Dr. We will drive over the continental divide through a lovely, ponderosa forest setting amid volcanic flows, cinder cones, and scenic sandstone bluffs landscape to El Morro National Monument.i?? This prominent high rocky promontory sheltered a large fresh-water pool, which attracted wildlife, as well as ancestral Pueblo, Spanish and Anglo-American travelers seeking water at the base of the bluff.
Georgia Oa€™Keefea€™s Beloved White Place: A Geo-Walk Through the Rocks at Plaza blanca with Dr. Located in the Sierra Negra Badlands, Our special day trip to Plaza Blanca (White Place) with our wonderful and favorite vulcanologist and Fulbright Scholar, Dr. You will also have the extraordinary blessing of spending a day with Sunny Dooley, a traditional Dine storyteller from the Chil Chi Tah area south of Gallup, who will guide us through her rural homeland. Make a memorable visit to the Crownpoint Navajo Rug auction, a significant monthly cultural event held in the Crownpoint Elementary School auditorium, where you will see many traditional weavers, as well as appreciate the opportunity to view a stunning collection of 200 or more weavings of all sizes, regional styles, and prices.
Tour participants will visit three recently discovered (2008) Apache petroglyph sites along the upper Rio Grande, near Pilar, with noted Ethnobotanist and archaeologist Dr. Visit some of the most important Archaic era petroglyphs in the U.S, estimated at 4,000-6,000 years old or more.
The charming town of El Rito, north of Santa Fe on El Rito Creek, is situated along the margin of both the Colorado Plateau and the Rio Grande rift. For those of you that have explored the eastern half (the part you see from State Highway 4 out of Los Alamos), of the Valles Caldera, this tour will provide new insight and understanding to the amazing geologic and natural history of the Valles Caldera. Join Alan Osborne, Southwest Cultural historian for a day trip to Zia Pueblo for feast day dances. Spend an enlightening day with noted archaeologist, scholar, author and professor emeritus Dr. Arroyo Hondo was composed of 1,000 rooms arranged in 1 and 2-story room blocks and was originally investigated and partially excavated by Nels Nelson of the American Museum of Natural History. Tijeras Pueblo is on the east side of the Sandia Mountains and was occupied, like Arroyo Hondo, from about 1300 to 1425 AD.
While neither Arroyo Hondo nor Tijeras Pueblos remained occupied into the mid-1400's, settlement did continue at a pueblo in the modern village of San Antonio. Paa-ko Pueblo also began in the 1300's AD as a plaza-oriented adobe-walled compound of several hundred rooms.
Journey into the magical Canyonlands and Arches National Parks of southeast Utah and the spectacular Red i??Rock Country of the Colorado Plateau for an unforgettable five-day experience with Dr. Something extraordinary happened a thousand years ago in a shallow canyon in the heart the San Juan Basin of northwestern New Mexico. Saturday, April 7, 2007 The many layers of geologic history unfold as we spend a fascinating day hiking among the sacred landscape and spectacular i??formations of the new Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument. This one-day hiking adventure will explore the geologic story of the Abiquiu area, including rock formations and vistas that inspired Georgia Oa€™Keeffe. With Deputy Director of the OAS and Chaco scholar, Wolky Toll and cultural historian Alan Osborne, we'll leave Santa Fe early in the morning and drive along a scenic route through lands of the Santa Ana and Zia Pueblos and the Jicarilla Apache Reservation on our way to Chaco Culture National Historic Park.
This six day tour of the Rio Grande Pueblos will include visits to Taos, Picuris, San Ildefonso, Pojoaque, Cochiti, and Zia Pueblos, as well as tours of important and seldom visited Eastern Pueblo archaeological sites, including Tsankawi, Hanat Kotyiti, Guisewa, Kuaua, Pecos, and the world famous rock art panels of the Galisteo Basin. Departing Santa Fe, we will travel to EspaA±ola, then turn west onto Forest Road 144 (also known as 39-mile road), winding our way up into the northern Jemez Mountains. In reference to his cosmopolitan ancestry, Johnson has described himself as a "one-man melting pot" — with a combination of Muslims, Jews and Christians comprising his great-grandparentage.[6] His father's maternal grandmother, Marie Louise de Pfeffel, was a descendant of Prince Paul of Wurttemberg through his relationship with a German actress. They have two sons—Milo Arthur (born 1995) and Theodore Apollo (born 1999)—and two daughters—Lara Lettice (born 1993) and Cassia Peaches (born 1997).[13] Boris Johnson and his family currently live in Holloway, North London. In 1999 he became editor of The Spectator, where he stayed until December 2005 upon being appointed Shadow Minister for Higher Education.
He is also author of three collections of journalism, Johnson's Column, Lend Me Your Ears and Have I Got Views For You.
On 2 April 2006 it was alleged in the News of the World that Johnson had had another extramarital affair, this time with Times Higher Education Supplement journalist Anna Fazackerley. Yet Londoners have little confidence in the Mayor spending their money with care and prudence.
It was here that David Cameron and all his supporters gathered to congratulate him on becoming Mayor of London. Indeed, Turkey could serve as a model to be emulated by any nation which finds refugees from any of the four corners of the world standing at its doors.In 1992, Turkish Jewry celebrated not only the anniversary of this gracious welcome, but also the remarkable spirit of tolerance and acceptance which has characterized the whole Jewish experience in Turkey. In 1537 the Jews expelled from Apulia (Italy) after the city fell under Papal control, in 1542 those expelled from Bohemia by King Ferdinand found a safe haven in the Ottoman Empire. In the early 19th century, Abraham de Camondo established a modern school, "La Escola", causing a serious conflict between conservative and secular rabbis which was only settled by the intervention of Sultan Abdulaziz in 1864. In 1926, on the eve of Turkey's adoption of the Swiss Civil Code, the Jewish Community renounced its minority status on personal rights.During the tragic days of World War II, Turkey managed to maintain its neutrality. The vast majority live in Istanbul, with a community of about 2.500 in Izmir and other smaller groups located in Adana, Ankara, Antakya, Bursa, Canakkale, Kirklareli etc. La Buena Esperansa and La Puerta del Oriente started in Izmir in 1843 and Or Israelwas first published in Istanbul ten years later.
The Community cannot levy taxes, but can request donations.Two Jewish hospitals, the 98 bed Or-Ahayim in Istanbul and the 22 bed KaratasHospital in Izmir, serve the Community.
An essential prelude to any visit to any synagogue in Turkey is contact with the Jewish Heritage tour company in Istanbul . Jewish communities were invited to take up residence at HaskA¶y on the eastern bank of the Golden Horn. Indeed, Turkey could serve as a model to be emulated by any nation which finds refugees from any of the four corners of the world standing at its doors. The events being planned - symposiums, conferences, concerts, exhibitions, films and books, restoration of ancient Synagogues etc - commemorated the longevity and prosperity of the Jewish community. When the Ottomans captured Bursa in 1326 and made it their capital, they found a Jewish community oppressed under Byzantine rule. In fact, from the early 15th century on, the Ottomans actively encouraged Jewish immigration.
In 1537 the Jews expelled from Apulia (Italy) after the city fell under Papal control, in 1542 those expelled from Bohemia by King Ferdinand found a safe haven in the Ottoman Empire. Four Turkish cities: Istanbul, Izmir, Safed and Salonica became the centres of Sephardic Jewry. In 1493, only one year after their expulsion from Spain, David & Samuel ibn Nahmias established the first Hebrew printing press in Istanbul.


As a result, leadership of the community began to shift away from the religious figure to secular forces. In 1926, on the eve of Turkey's adoption of the Swiss Civil Code, the Jewish Community renounced its minority status on personal rights. As early as 1933 Ataturk invited numbers of prominent German Jewish professors to flee Nazi Germany and settle in Turkey. The vast majority live in Istanbul, with a community of about 2.500 in Izmir and other smaller groups located in Adana, Ankara, Antakya, Bursa, Canakkale, Kirklareli etc. Additionally, the Community maintains in Istanbul a school complex including elementary and secondary schools for around 700 students.
La Buena Esperansa and La Puerta del Oriente started in Izmir in 1843 and Or Israelwas first published in Istanbul ten years later. Both cities have homes for the aged (Moshav Zekinim) and several welfare associations to assist the poor, the sick, the needy children and orphans.
Our special visit to the southwest Santa Fe petroglyph site of La Cieneguilla features one of our favorite study leaders: David Grant Noble, noted and celebrated editor, photographer and archaeology writer and author.
Although the Pueblo is not more than thirty minutes from Santa Fe, the fact that outsiders are not encouraged to visit has made it possible for them to maintain their individuality and resist the influences of modern life. The 4th edition of his Ancient Ruins of the Southwest: An Archaeological Guide is due to appear in 2015, as his a new edited volume, Living the Ancient Southwest. We float through the beautiful canyons of the Yampa River for three days, reaching the confluence with the Green River in Echo Park, so-named by John Wesley Powell on his famous 1869 expedition. The Yampa is the only remaining free-running, undammed tributary of the Colorado and its flow level depends on the winter snow pack and spring runoff. Our outfitter will be Dinosaur River Expeditions, family owned and locally operated in Vernal Utah staffed by experienced and knowledgeable river guides that love sharing the beauty, the history and the wildlife of the mighty Yampa River of Colorado and the crystal clear waters of Utaha€™s Green River of the Flaming Gorge.
Three nights lodging at Landmark Suites in Vernal, Utah (2 nights before the rafting trip and 1 night after).
1300-1600) by visiting four important Classic Period Ancestral Tewa sites in the Ojo Caliente Valley northwest of Santa Fe.
Following the 1692-4 Spanish Reconquest, Old Sana Ana Pueblo (Tamaya), was founded 8 miles NW of Bernalillo. We raft into the Canyon beginning at Leea€™s Ferry and exit the canyon via scenic helicopter and charter air. He holds a mastera€™s degree in geology at Northern Arizona University and leads tours for the Museum of Northern Arizona, The Grand Canyon Field Institute and the Smithsonian, including round the world trips by private charter. Our 190-mile trip between Leea€™s Ferry and Whitmore Wash has been selected by Wayne as covering the most scenic and geologically significant sites within the canyon in just the right balance of time on the river and off site exploration.
Jane Coulter in 1922 as a tourist camp, ita€™s style was later adapted to most National Park Service locations.
Explore the relationships between settled Puebloan villages along the Rio Grande and early Spanish-led expeditionaries. This led to a race for claimants to the treasures, the search and disappearance of artifacts along with the creation of a brisk trade in antiquities looted from these sites before federal laws were enacted to preserve them.
After a warm welcome by a Harvey Girl we will get a detailed description of what railroad passengers experienced as they will bring back the deep appreciation of those magnificent days when the customer was king and the Harvey Girls, a€?those respectable young womena€™ and Couriers were ambassadors of impeccable service and local culture. We will visit friends who have invited us to feast with them as they observe this important sainta€™s religious day in the Pueblos. It was extensively studied and researched by School of Advanced Research (SAR) in the 1970a€™s and has been the subject of nine monographs and numerous scholarly articles. These two parks are geologic showcases for the Jurassic Navajo sandstone, the largest petrified dune field in the world.
We then travel to Zion National Park where we will stay in the park at the renowned historic National Park Service Lodge cabins, Zion Lodge for 3 nights.
The Spanish referred to these people as Pueblos (Spanish for a€?townsa€?), no doubt to distinguish them from the regiona€™s rancherA­a dwellers and nomads. Wea€™ll visit the contemporary Eastern Pueblos of Cochiti and Jemez, the Western Pueblos of Hopi and Acoma, and Ancestral Pueblo sites in Chaco, Mesa Verde, the San Juan River Gorge, and Canyon de Chelly. Scott Ortman will lead us on a very special tour of the Santa Clara Tribal Park at Puye Cliff Dwellings. We will hike the 3.6 miles South Mesa Trail Loop to Tsin Kletsin, (3 hours) on the South Rim with a visit to the important great kiva at Casa Rinconada. With less driving back to town for overnight lodging in a town, we will see morea€¦nature, birds, plants, landscape, the skya€¦basically the full day and night Chaco experience. Kirt Kempter for a 4-day geologic exploration of the Creede and Lake City and Pagosa Springs, region of Southern Colorado, where four of the massive supervolcanoes eruptions occurred. Visit the scenic North Clear Creek Falls and the spectacular Slumgullion landslide en route to Lake City. Zia achievements in pottery and other arts and crafts, their storied history as well as spiritual tenacity are legendary.
Our purpose will be to enhance our appreciation and understanding of these special sacred places and the spiritual traditions which hold them dear. We will also visit the Jemez State Monument, a 17th century Spanish Mission church, and the ancient village it was built near, now operated by the New Mexico State Monuments Division, as well as a delightful lunch at Deba€™s Deli in Jemez Springs, a resort community in the beautiful valley of the Jemez River.
Joe Suina, former Governor of Cochiti Pueblo and Professor of Education (ret.), for the renowned Santo Domingo Feast Day, an annual ceremonial held in one of New Mexicoa€™s most colorful Pueblos on the Rio Grande. Suinaa€™s home in Cochiti Pueblo for an informative cultural education presentation on the ceremonialism of Pueblo dances and Sainta€™s day feast celebrations in theEastern Keres villages of Cochiti and Santo Domingo. Tuition of $90 includes Study Leader honorarium, transportation, meal, and donation to the Keres Language Project in which Dr. Steve Lekson and Karl Laumbach for an archaeology and history field study trip to visit important sites of the Canada Alamosa, located in southwestern New Mexico. Studies suggest that the Pueblo populations of the CaA±ada Alamosa were at times strongly linked to a central place(s) and at other times were reorganizing in an independent effort to adapt and survive. Rio Alamosa is fed by a perennially flowing warm spring (Ojo Caliente), home of the Warm Springs Apache, the hot springs are located three miles northwest of the ranch headquarters. Enjoy an educational and relaxing 3-day trip down the scenic San Juan River between Montezuma Creek, Utah and Mexican Hat.
Shortly before our river trip ends, we will pass the amazing balancing rock known as the Mexican Hat, which is near our river put-out.
All meals: 4 breakfasts, 4 lunches and 4 dinnersa€¦2 at a€?Bluffa€™s besta€™ and 2 a€?round the campfire. Visit one of the traditional western i??Keres villages of the Lagunas, Paraje, with Southwest cultural historian Alan Osborne where we will attend the annual Feast Day honoring Saint Joseph, patron saint of the Pueblo.
Containing some of the most spectacular and b bizarre geologic formations in New Mexico, including gravity-defying hoodoos and multi-hued shales, the stacked layers, or formations within this 45,000 acre wilderness area show a continuous record of ancient environments, formed between 160 million and 40 million years ago, with episodes of uplift and erosion, inland seas, shorelines, estuaries, large forested river deltas, meandering steams, bogs, and numerous fresh-water lakes leaving evidence of early mammal fossils, dinosaurs, petrified wood caches, and periodic volcanic ash showers. Its subtle natural beauty, with wooded hillsides, dramatic volcanic dikes, and wide, open grasslands has drawn many noted contemporary artists to settle there and has attracted attention from those seeking easily accessible but less traveled areas containing important sites of natural history, including those who specialize in flora and fauna, as well as geology and vulcanology. Kendrick on the many archaeological sites found El Malpais and recent discoveries, as well as current preservation projects in which Dr. Taylor, an 11,301-foot volcano, which figures prominently into native cosmology, life here has been longstanding, adaptive, and enriched by the landscape. We will a chance to see some of the most exciting and interesting ancient and historic petroglyphs (more than 2,000) in North America, including the Onate inscription of April 1605, (15 years before Plymouth colony in Massachusetts) most of which are accessible by a scenic paved walking trail. Kirt Kempter, who will feature his a€?wise and well-considereda€™ thoughts and research on the geology between Santa Fe and Abiquiu, including a few roadside stops to look at important landscape features, rocks, scenic overlooks, and geologic field maps. Paul Zolbrod, Research Associate, Laboratory of Anthropology, Santa Fe, Professor of Literature, Dine College, Crownpoint, Professor Emeritus, Allegheny College, Pennsylvania, and Author, Dine Behane. Sunny is a scholar for the New Mexico Endowment for the Humanities and travels widely sharing her culture through stories. Included is transportation, lodging at legendary El Rancho in Gallup on Route 66, most meals, special presenters and Study Leaders honoraria, and donation to Chil Chi Tah Elementary School, and celebration dinner.
We will take you to seldom visited sites in northern New Mexico That are spiritually sacred and significant to different traditions which have made a mark on New Mexicoa€™s cultural and religious landscape.
These western-Keres speaking and traditonal people have occupied the scenic hilltop village and this rugged region NW of Albuquerque for centuries.
Linda Cordell, with whom we will be visiting four archaeological sites on the edge of the Galisteo Basin: Tijeras Pueblo, Paa-ko Pueblo, Arroyo Hondo Pueblo, and San Antonio.
Intensively studied by Douglas Schwartz for the SAR, it sits at the margins of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains just outside Santa Fe. It is located above a seep, it is bisected by 2 arroyos, and was excavated by UNM field schools in the late 1940's, and again in the 1970's, directed by W. Kirt Kempter, vulcanologist, geologist, former Fulbright scholar, and Alan Osborne, Southwest cultural historian. Not only spectacular vistas, but also wildlife, including bighorn sheep, are always a possibility for sighting and photographing on this memorable day. Puebloan peoples constructed over a dozen elaborate Great Houses of stone reaching three to four stories above the desert floor. Wea€™ll first arrive at the Chaco Visitora€™s Center on the north side of the canyon, which features exhibits and interpretations of recent archaeological research as well as historic excavations, and artifacts revealing ancient life at Chaco. Through Prince Paul, Johnson is a descendant of King George II, and through George's great-great-great grandfather King James I a descendant of all of the previous British royal houses. His comic first novel Seventy-Two Virgins was published in 2004,[16] and his next book will be The New British Revolution, though he has put publication on hold until after the London Mayoral election.[17] He was nominated in 2004 for a British Academy Television Award, and has attracted several unofficial fan clubs and sites. In 2004 he was appointed to the front bench as Shadow Minister for the Arts in a small reshuffle resulting from the resignation of the Shadow Home Affairs Spokesman, Nick Hawkins.
The events being planned - symposiums, conferences, concerts, exhibitions, films and books, restoration of ancient Synagogues etc - commemorated the longevity and prosperity of the Jewish community. Another Portuguese Marrano, Alvaro Mendes, was named Duke of Mytylene in return of his diplomatic services to the Sultan.Salamon ben Nathan Eskenazi arranged the first diplomatic ties with the British Empire.
As early as 1933 Ataturk invited numbers of prominent German Jewish professors to flee Nazi Germany and settle in Turkey. Now one newspaper survives: SALOM (Shalom), a fourteen to sixteen pages weekly in Turkish with one page in Judeo-Spanish. Both cities have homes for the aged (Moshav Zekinim) and several welfare associations to assist the poor, the sick, the needy children and orphans. A bronze column found in Ankara confirms the rights the Emperor Augustos accorded the Jews of Asia Minor.Ottoman Period,299 - 1492 As the Ottoman Empire expands more and more Jewish populations , mostly Romaniot ( Greek-speaking Jews who lived in the Roman Empire ) are incorporated into Ottoman lands. Under Sultan Beyazit II ( 1481-1512 ) Jews persecuted in Spain and Portugal were encouraged to establish themselves in the Ottoman Empire. As a whole, the celebration aimed to demonstrate the richness and security of life Jews have found in the Ottoman Empire and the Turkish Republic over seven centuries, and showed that indeed it is not impossible for people of different creeds to live together peacefully under one flag. Another Portuguese Marrano, Alvaro Mendes, was named Duke of Mytylene in return of his diplomatic services to the Sultan.Salamon ben Nathan Eskenazi arranged the first diplomatic ties with the British Empire.
Shlomo haLevi Alkabescomposed the Lekhah Dodi a hymn which welcomes the Sabbath according to both Sephardic and Ashkenazi ritual. The same year the Takkanot haKehilla (By-laws of the Jewish Community) was published, defining the structure of the Jewish community. Mustafa Kemal Ataturk was elected president, the Caliphate was abolished and a secular constitution was adopted. Before and during the war years, these scholars contributed a great deal to the development of the Turkish university system. Fifty Lay Counsellors look after the secular affairs of the Community and an Executive Committee of fourteen runs the daily matters. Now one newspaper survives: SALOM (Shalom), a fourteen to sixteen pages weekly in Turkish with one page in Judeo-Spanish.
There are several Jewish professors teaching at the Universities of Istanbul and Ankara, and many Turkish Jews are prominent in business, industry, liberal professions and journalism. We will learn about the history and theories relating to Ancestral Puebloan rock art, migration of Tewa Pueblo peoples, Colonial Spanish exploration and settlement along El Camino Real (Royal Road).
Individual interests are subordinate to community values and responsibilities so that the strong ceremonial structure and the traditional rituals have kept the people as a vital and distinctive tribal entity with a proud heritage of ancient origin. Along the way, wea€™ll see the remains of a pioneera€™s cabin, a series of pictographs in the Barrier Canyon style, and Serviceberry Shelter, where Archaic hunter-gatherers camped millennia ago. See architecture, agricultural fields, and ritual features in the context of some of the largest and best-preserved ancient Pueblo sites in the region. Tribal members usually maintain two places of residence, one in the farming community along the Rio Grande and the other a traditional home on the north bank of the Jemez River several miles away. The trip includes hotel lodging and dinner the night before the excursion as Wayne sets the stage for our grand adventure and another night and dinner after the trip wraps up as we celebrate our amazing journey through this vividly colored canyon, a nine day study tour on the most coveted raft trip in the world. Discuss the origin of the canyon and how the complexity of erosional features of the Colorado River and precipitation created and continue to shape the canyon. We begin our journey with slow moving rapids, which increase in intensity as we travel further into the Canyon.
Our highly recommended outfitter, Colorado River & Trail Expeditions (CRATE) has been in business since 1971 and features knowledgeable, trained and experienced river guides, who are excellent outdoor chefs, enthusiastic river companions and certified in CPR, Wilderness Medicine and River Rescue.
Protecting these lands from Anglo incursion, touristic curiosity and the federal government has created a seldom visited trove of four well-preserved canyon cliff dwellings requiring three miles of hiking and climbing five ladders when accompanied by a Ute tribal guide. We will learn about Fred Harvey, the Englishman who founded the hotel and restaurant chain.
They have a strong sense of identity and retain ancient ceremonies and rituals and dances tenaciously. The site was occupied in two separate and distinct phases more than six centuries ago, and at its height was comprised of approximately 1,000 rooms. Over 2000 feet of Navajo Sandstone form massive cliffs within Zion Canyon, creating one of eartha€™s grandest geologic settings. Our days at Zion will include visits to more remote corners of the park, such as Kolob Canyon in the northwest, and the more central Kolob Terrace Road, where we will hike the scenic Northgate Peaks Trail. Classifying people by settlement pattern and architecture, the most visible of cultural expressions, may be a natural thing for explorers to do, but i??the label a€?Puebloa€? glossed over considerable cultural variability. Participants will be regaled with stories of the Pueblo past from an archaeologist (Ware) and Native Pueblo scholar (Swentzell), and view the spectacular landscapes of the Southwest 4-Corners from the comfort of a modern coach (with on-board restroom!). These ancestral Puebloan sites figure prominently in his ethno genesis research on Tewa Pueblo origins, migrations, settlement patterns, and history. This study tour is designed to experience 2 backcountry trails while still visiting Great Houses within the central a€?downtowna€™ area of Chaco Canyon Culture National Historic Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Their mission church and plaza and the village and surrounding hills and mountains are powerful spiritual forces. Visits include (subject to change): Upaya Buddhist Zen Center, Sikh Dharma in Sombrillo, Plaza Blanca and Dar al Islam in Abiquiu, and Christ in the Desert Monastery overlooking the Chama River, the Sikh Dharma in Somlbrillo, Our day will be filled with opportunities for reflection and awareness on the different paths for restoring balance and harmony in our world. 1312-1350 and is possibly one of the places where immigrants from the Four Corners region entered and settled the northern Rio Grande region. In the centuries before the Apache (Athapascan) migration in to this area, it was the setting for two large-plaza Pueblos, a migrant Mesa Verde village, a huge 500-room Tularosa town, the northernmost Mimbres village, the southernmost Socorro site, and a sizeable earlier Ancestral Puebloan pithouse community, all located on the Monticello Box Ranch. Wea€™ll camp for 2 nights, learning about the cultural history and archaeology of the region with David Grant Noble. Comfortable overnight motel lodging the night before and after our 3-days and 2-nights on the river at Desert Rose Inn, a log lodge recently built on the edge of the town of Bluff, Utah. This scenic stretch of the river is especially noted for its Puebloan ruins and Basketmaker rock art panels and many are only accessible from the river. Honorarium for our exceptional Study Leader and river guides, all fees for permits and services. You will have the opportunity to be part of this important ceremonial day and by your silent observation both give and receive the blessings of the Lagunas. The area is filled with multi-colored ash created by iron, manganese and crystal-forming silicates, and has been described as a paleontological treasure trove! Kirt, offering plenty of time for on-site educational lectures, photographic moments, and awe-inspiring sacred landscape. Drive back to Santa Fe that afternoon for evening arrival with a stop at our favorite Cuba, NM dinner spot, Brunoa€™s for some home-style cooking before our Santa Fe evening return.
Many myths and legends abound about this remarkable area, including oral tradition never written down. For an optional energetic uphill hike, those interested may visit the ancestral Zuni village of Atsinnaon top of El Morro. Along the way, we will Santa Rosa de Lima, the historic site overlooking the Chama River and original site of the Abiquiu Valley settlement.
We visit her local Chapter House and to the Chil Chi Tah School, where you will meet Navajo teachers and students. Our purpose will be to enhance our appreciation and understanding of these various sacred places and the spiritual and religious traditions which hold them in esteem. Ford who serves as Arthur Thurnow Professor of Anthropology and former director, Ethnobotanical Laboratory, University of Michigan. Zia, located beside the Jemez River, is near the Nacamiento Mountains and red rock foothills of the Pajarito and Jemez Plateaus. Each of these is representative of different ways Ancestral Puebloans built 14th century communities. In the 1970's, portions of the ancestral pueblo village and the historic San Miguel de Laredo were excavated by the Museum of New Mexico and scholars conducted important ethno historic research. By the 1500's, a smaller, mostly stone-masonry pueblo was built on-site and occupied into the 1600's AD.
Wea€™ll spend all four nights at the new and beautiful Red Cliffs Lodge, featuring a popular restaurant and on-site winery and vineyard, as well as beautifully appointed riverside timber lodges with private patios overlooking the Colorado River. Within just a few generations, masonry Great Houses were built by Pueblo communities throughout the San Juan Basin and beyond to eventually encompass portions of four adjacent states. Following lunch we will take the short hike to the nearby-unexcavated Una Vida site, as well as an optional scramble up to the petroglyphs overlooking Una Vida. In 1995 a recording of a telephone conversation was made public revealing a plot by a friend to physically assault a News of the World journalist. As a whole, the celebration aimed to demonstrate the richness and security of life Jews have found in the Ottoman Empire and the Turkish Republic over seven centuries, and showed that indeed it is not impossible for people of different creeds to live together peacefully under one flag. The historian Josephus Flavius relates that Aristotle "met Jewish people with whom he had an exchange of views during his trip across Asia Minor."Ancient synagogue ruins have been found in Sardis, Miletus, Priene, Phocee, etc. The Pope had no other alternative than to release them, the Ottoman Empire being the "Super Power" of those days.y 1477, Jewish households in Istanbul numbered 1647 or 11% of the total. Jewish women such as Dona Gracia Mendes Nasi "La Seniora" and Esther Kyra exercised considerable influence in the Court.In the free air of the Ottoman Empire, Jewish literature flourished.
As a result, leadership of the community began to shift away from the religious figure to secular forces.World War I brought to an end the glory of the Ottoman Empire. Before and during the war years, these scholars contributed a great deal to the development of the Turkish university system.
There are about 100 Karaites, an independent group who does not accept the authority of the Chief Rabbi.Turkish Jews are legally represented, as they have been for many centuries, by the Hahambasi, the Chief Rabbi.
They are officially recognised as dhimmi,a protected non-Muslim community.1326 The Ottoman capture Bursa and make in their capital.
Eventually he converts to Islam with his Jewish followers creating a new sect by accepting Islam outwardly but practising a new type of ' Sabbatean Judaism ' eventually leaving the realm of the Jewish community.1839 - 1876 The Tanzimat reforms lead to the application of news laws,bringing equality to all Ottoman citizens,regardless of religion. Over time Judeo-Spanish would be phased out and Turkish takes hold as the Jewish communities mother tongue.1933 Turkey recruits German Jewish academics facing Nazi discriminative policies in order to strengthen Istanbul and Ankara universities. A bronze column found in Ankara confirms the rights the Emperor Augustus accorded the Jews of Asia Minor. Sultan Orhan gave them permission to build the Etz ha-Hayyim (Tree of Life) synagogue which remained in service until nineteen forties.
During World War II Turkey served as a safe passage for many Jews fleeing the horrors of the Nazism. There are about 100 Karaites, an independent group who does not accept the authority of the Chief Rabbi. Representatives of Jewish foundations and institutions meet four times a year as a so-called ??think tank??
Some of them are very old, especially Ahrida Synagogue in the Balat area, which dates from middle15th century. At certain times of the year, however, they welcome visitors and the Green Corn Dances in May are the main attraction to outsiders and other Pueblo people as well. We will learn about the archaeology of the Desert Archaic and Fremont cultures through Davida€™s lectures and hikes.


Wea€™ll also hike to Mantlea€™s Cave, a huge rock shelter where Fremont Indians stored an astonishing array of specialized items in storage cysts, now in the collections of the University of Colorado, Boulder. Set among towering red cliffs and ancient ponderosa pines, we may see a variety of wildlife, deer, eagles and big horn sheep along the shoreline. Learn Tewa history and how we use different techniques, archaeological review and Tewa oral tradition, to better understand their past. Learn about the variety of species of mammals, reptiles, fish and birds that make the Grand Canyon home, including many threatened and endangered species and plants that have found a refuge in the Parka€™s protected lands.
There is plenty of whitewater excitement, including some of the most famous a€?drops and fallsa€? in the world: Horn Creek, Hermit, Crystal and Lava Falls.
While millions visit Mesa Verde National Park, which borders Ute reservation lands, these are seldom seen and striking sites that have not been stripped of their ancient presence and essence. Wea€™ll tour the famed Castaneda, newly purchased and under renovation by its new owner, Allan Affecldt (or resident partner), who also restored La Posada, the Harvey Hotel in Winslow, Az. The significance of Arroyo Hondo is that it was one of the earliest large, aggregated pueblos built during a period when settlement patterns throughout the northern Rio Grande were evolving in the direction of large towns located near dependable sources of water.A We will have an archaeological tour of this important cultural site, owned by the Archaeological Conservancy, with site steward and noted author, and archaeologist, Dr. Several easy to moderate hikes will be offered within Zion Canyon, including Echo Canyon, Weeping Rock, and the Riverside Walk. Coral Hills Best Western will serve as our base for two nights to explore beautiful Snow Canyon. The people the Spanish called Pueblos spoke at least seven mutually unintelligible languages (six are still spoken today) from four different language families, and their linguistic diversity was mirrored in many of their social, economic, and religious practices and institutions. He is able, using linguistics, metaphors, architecture, and material culture, to follow ancestors on their long journey south from Mesa Verde and the San Juan River Basin. Between them, wea€™ll learn about the history and theories relating to ancestral rock art, migration of Tewa Pueblo peoples, Colonial Spanish exploration and settlement along El Camino Real (Royal Road), plus fascinating concepts of earth science, significant geographic landscape and visible volcanic features young and old we see in this region, as well as the causes of the rise of the majestic Sangre de Cristo Mountains. Wea€™ll be like trees: silent observers, important witnesses, participants in the continuing strength of Keres Pueblo culture here today. Wea€™ll explore the sitea€™s well-preserved architecture, cliff dwellings, artifacts, rock art and trails, and the world-quarter shrine all while overlooking the stunning Piedra Lumbre made famous by Georgia Oa€™Keeffe. Suina will share with us aspects of culture, history, spiritual underpinnings, and ritual observances which are tied to the rhythms of nature in the native world of the Eastern Keres Pueblos.
The area has been extensively studied by scholars for several years in recognition and interpretation of frontiers and migrations of peoples in the archaeological record. Lekson and others have made a strong case that the Canada Alamosa was the destination for a migrant community from the Mesa Verde culture area.
He has guided educational and archaeological groups down the San Juan River for more than twenty years.
Learn the history of the Keres world and its influence from both the ancestral Puebloan and European traditions.
Kirt Kempter, will use this outdoor classroom as an educational opportunity to explain and discuss the earth history of this beautiful basin in our own backyard. From them, you will learn about the magnificent natural and cultural history of this scenic area, called a€?the evil countrya€™, or the badlands, by chroniclers on the Coronado Expedition of 1540, as a result of their extreme difficulty in crossing through lava flows by the expeditionaries and their horses along the legendary Zuni-Acoma Trail.
The mythology of El Malpais will be discussed as well as the many different native cultures in the area, including Acoma, Zuni, Dine (Navajo), and others, which have made their home in the region for centuries and in some cases, millennia. All will have access to the modern Visitor Center, featuring rangers, interpretive exhibits, and books and literature. Departing Santa Fe, we will travel through EspaA±ola, turn west over the Rio Grande, and on the north side of town turn west again onto a dirt road which we will travel for several miles on a scenic forest road, where we wind our way up through the Pajarito Plateau and into the scenic Jemez Mountains. Zolbrod will escort us to an important ancient Chacoan outlier, Kin YaA­a (Tall House), where he will help us understand the importance of Chaco Canyon culture.
You will have an opportunity to interact and learn about Dine culture in education from the teachers and students and tour the school.
Our Study Leader is a specialist on sacred spaces and places, and this will be a unique opportunity to share in his wisdom and insights. After scenic drive up the northern Rio Grande valley to Pilar, we will access the petroglyphs by hiking to view some of the most exciting images on stone.
Forest Service and members of the American Rock Art Research Association, as well as Arizona State University scholars, these areas (Sites #006 and #147) are filled with over 600 known rock art carvings, which are astronomically aligned to Summer solstice and equinox sunrise and sunsets. These lands were the site of hunting gathering and farming communities for many millennia, as this region was populated by different peoples over long periods of time who came together to become those who were encountered by Spanish conquerors, missionaries and settlers.
All four pueblos were constructed of adobe and noted scholars excavated each to different degrees during the 20th century and today visitors see low mounds of earth.
Pottery traditions of the village were shared with other puebloans of the Tewa Basin and Pajarito Plateau but Arroyo Hondo appears not to have participated in much broader networks of exchange. While much smaller than Arroyo Hondo, with about 250 rooms, it experienced 2 different construction episodes during which the community completely reorganized its space. This is one of Americaa€™s recent national monuments and is an important area sacred to Keres and other Pueblo peoples.
Half a century later, 8070 Jewish houses were listed in the city.The Life of Ottoman Jews For 300 years following the expulsion, the prosperity and creativity of the Ottoman Jews rivalled that of the Golden Age of Spain. During World War II Turkey served as a safe passage for many Jews fleeing the horrors of the Nazism.
They find a Jewish community oppressed under Byzantine rule.The Jews greet the Ottomans as saviours. 1934 As a result of pogroms in Edirne and Canakkale the majority of the Jews A±f Thrace migrate to Istanbul. They will ask you to complete a form giving details of a reference your adress in Turkey and the dates and times you wish to visit particular synagogues,ISTANBUL,After the Turkish conquest of Constantinople in1453 , Sultan Mehmet II ( the Conqueor 1451-1481 ) encouraged immigration to repopulate the city.
While the Jewish communities of Greece were wiped out almost completely by Hitler, the Turkish Jews remained secure.
The 15th and 16th century Haskoy and Kuzguncuk cemeteries in Istanbul are still in use today. Our hike will include some relatively flat trails on the mesa top, some rough uneven terrain along the boulder slope where the rock art is located, but will also include the short but steep rocky talus access to the mesa top, so please come prepared for this rugged landscape on the outskirts of Santa Fe which overlooks the important riparian stream banks of the beautiful Santa Fe River downstream from the city now featuring beaver dam ponds. Hundreds of men, women and children dance throughout the day, accompanied by a male chorus, in the huge sunken bowl of the Plaza worn down by the centuries.
Ann features Corn Dance, a colorful spectacle which draws the entire Pueblo together as most of its population, nearly 700 people, return to the Old Pueblo (normally not open to outside visitors) for traditional ceremonies and visiting native arts and crafts vendors. Discover more about the 5000 year human history presence and importance of the canyon to ancestral Puebloan, Hopi, Havasupai, Navajo, Hualapai, Paiute and Zuni. As importantly wea€™ll hike beautiful side canyons with cascading waterfalls, turquoise pools, and the cooling shade of hidden grottos and enjoy stargazing at night. Wea€™ll enjoy dinner, a lecture, and overnight at the historic Old Plaza Hotel, built in 1889. It is with anticipation that we look forward to spending time with our dear friend, Dora Tse Pe, the legendry potter and San Ildefonso resident as well as her family who have invited us to share a feast meal with them on this important occasion.
George, Utah, just a few minutes from Snow Canyon State Park, where geologically young volcanoes poured dark basalt lava through spectacular canyons of red and white Navajo sandstone. The close proximity of Snow Canyon and Zion will allow us to spend significant quality time in both parks, with less highway travel. On Day 3 we begin our exploration of Zion, lodging for three nights in individual historic cabins right in the heart of Zion National Park, a very special opportunity indeed. They were not, in other words, a monolithic culture, but several different peoples who shared cultural practices. On this day trip, we will see remains of Tewa houses dating from the 14th century, much evidence of pottery as well as other artifacts in situ. We will also review the local hydrology and understand the presence of many natural springs nearby. It is with anticipation that we look forward to spending time with legendary potter and Zia native, Dora Tse Pe and her family who have invited us to visit and share a feast meal with them on this important occasion.
He will also share information on the important Keres language preservation project for which this study tour is organized to support.
In addition to providing commentary on each site visited, he will offer us interesting facets of Puebloan and Dine (Navajo) history.
Wea€™ll also visit the beautiful Laguna Mission church, operated by the Franciscan order, built in 1699 and containing beautiful native paintings, colonial reredo (altar screen), and traditional adobe architecture.
We will travel through the historic ghost town of Waldo and along the railroad tracks laid through the area in the late 19th century to the picturesque village of Cerrillos, then travel across the Galisteo Basin heading east on the backloads through this scenic area. Visit a small rural family-owned Trading Post, rarely seen by outsiders, which helps bridge cultures and maintain community. Special visits and tours of Dar al Islam Mosque in Abiquiu, Christ in the Desert Monastery, the Sikh Dharma and community in Somlbrillo near Espanola, the Buddhist stupa in Santa Fe, plus special presentations by representatives at these very special locations. In addition to petroglyphs, there will be spectacular views of the Rio Grande gorge, birds, possibly early wild flowers, important Apache cultural shrines and their campsites. These types of carvings from this era are often associated with nomadic hunter-gatherer societies.
While conquest is an important chapter of Pueblolan history, a€?survivancea€™ is its modern reality. Why did ancient Puebloans build monuments whose construction required the quarrying and shaping of thousands of tons of sandstone from canyon walls and the hauling of over 200,000 pine logs from mountain slopes 60 miles away, all to build a dozen 300-600 room edifices that housed only a handful of people?
The trail is well marked and follows along a small arroyo and enters an elegantly carved slot canyon, then climbing to a scenic overview of the spectacular Rio Grande valley where we will enjoy a gourmet picnic lunch. A short walk down the canyon will lead us to Kin Kletso, an important part of the developmental history of the area. Shlomo haLevi Alkabescomposed the Lekhah Dodi a hymn which welcomes the Sabbath according to both Sephardic and Ashkenazi ritual.
Mustafa Kemal Ataturk was elected president, the Caliphate was abolished and a secular constitution was adopted. While the Jewish communities of Greece were wiped out almost completely by Hitler, the Turkish Jews remained secure. Fifty Lay Counsellors look after the secular affairs of the Community and an Executive Committee of fourteen runs the daily matters. The trip inclui??des all lodging, meals, river and rafting arrangements and quality time with David Noble. Experience the soothing comfort of a quiet river valley and nearby pond, a welcome oasis in the heat of the summer.
Visit interesting historical sites only accessible by the river, study unique geological features, and gain a comprehensive educational perspective on the geology and natural history of this majestic canyon.
We will take a short hike to Piedras Marcadas Canyon, where the first petroglyph of a horse known in the United States is found amid a rich concentration of petroglyphs, most of which were created a century before European contact. On the next day, accompanied by our modern Harvey Girl we will tour the legendary Montezuma Hotel, now part of the United World College campus. Featuring gas log fireplaces and a private porch at each cabin, we promise a bit of quiet time to enjoy the majesty of one of our favorite U.S. The wealth of data on Pueblo culture, from three thousand years ago to the present day, provides an ideal laboratory for the study of culture change. Those who have accompanied Ware and Governor Joseph Suina on past Pueblo World Tours will visit many of the same destinations but see many new sites, and youa€™ll be able to follow along with Warea€™s commentary on Pueblo social history with an advance copy of his new critically acclaimed book. The site contains lots of petroglyph panels, spectacular views and a large important ancient Santa Clara village that includes a reconstructed kiva. Sam Duwe, assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology and Applied Archaeology and Director of the Tewa Basin Archaeological Research Project at Eastern New Mexico University. David is the author and editor of many books relating to Southwest archaeology and culture, including Ancient Ruins of the Southwest: An Archaeological Guide and most recently, In the Places of the Spirits. A short but interesting hike (one mile round-trip) will illustrate the fascinating earth history of the Cerrillos Hills, Ortiz Mountains and the beginning of rifts in the Santa Fe area.
In El Malpais are found ancient jagged lava flows, volcanic cinder cones and rims, pressure ridges, lava tubes, ice caves, and other landscape features, as well as prehistoric ruins and cairns, rock structures, and homesteads, plus important cultural sites where ancient pottery and other material artifacts have been discovered. Paul Catholic Church in Crownpoint, where Navajo spirituality coexists with Roman Catholic Christianity. The glyphs follow the contours of the rock and incorporate natural features, such as nodules, bumps, and cracks, into the carving. Some have said the Zia people have retained most of their traditional beliefs and thus absorbed very little influence of our dominant society. Cordella€™s interpretation, we will walk each of the sites to understand their similarities and differences.
Their kivas were of 2 different shapes and construction techniques, and the village maintained 2 different traditions of painted pottery, while participating in extensive trade networks. Why did ancestral Puebloan communities over a geographic region the size of New England build community centers that emulated these monumental structures? Learn the fascinating geologic story of how these dramatic columns have eroded as you appreciate the power of Mother Naturea€™s forces: wind, water, and time. Wea€™ll visit smaller habitation sites, small farming settlements surrounding Casa Rinconada, Chacoa€™s massive great kiva.
A bronze column found in Ankara confirms the rights the Emperor Augustus accorded the Jews of Asia Minor.Jewish communities in Anatolia flourished and continued to prosper through the Turkish conquest. In 1493, only one year after their expulsion from Spain, David & Sauel ibn Nahmias established the first Hebrew printing press in Istanbul.
Representatives of Jewish foundations and institutions meet four times a year as a so-called ??think tank?? Charming casitas, comfy beds and organic samples from the garden will round out our archaeological day excursions.
Appreciate the context, and underlying meanings of this powerful ritual and sacred cultural landscape. Our mission is to arrive before dawn so we witness the entrance into the village of the deer and other animals. Few places in world provide so much historical information, over so many centuries, on cultures that thrive today.
On the Saturday following the tour wea€™ll visit Cochiti Pueblo for a tour of the community by this yeara€™s Cochiti Governor, Dr. We begin to learn how Tewa people understand their own unique history and become witness to the kind of collaborative work Scott and tribal members have been doing to link the native understandings to Southwestern archaeological research. Our afternoon will conclude with a relaxed social Happy Hour, including a glass of wine and appetizers at Conniea€™s Casa, the owner-built, passive solar traditional home to Southwest Seminars Director, Connie Eichstaedt.
Includes transportation, 4 meals, overnight accommodations, entrance fees and Study Leadersa€™ honoraria.
You will also need long pants and hiking boots, hat, water, and hiking sticks (poles) if you use them.
They are typically deeply incised and may represent the only remnants of conscious communication left by these early peoples.
The Zia achievements in pottery and other arts and crafts, as well as spiritual tenacity is legendary. Was it political hegemony, economic imperialism, or religious fervor that inspired the architects of Chaco and their emulators?a€?a€?Amerinda€™s spring tour to the northern Southwest will spend two days in a€?Downtown Chacoa€? in search of answers to these questions. 3-mile roundtrip hike, 400 feet elevation gain Includes: Study leader honorarium, transportation and a lovely picnic lunch included. When the Ottomans captured Bursa in 1326 and made it their capital, they found a Jewish community oppressed under Byzantine rule. In Istanbul the new immigrants settled mostly near the Balat quarter on the western bank of the Golden Horn where a Jewish community had existed since Byzantine times. Along with the amazing scenery and geo-education wea€™ll enjoy periods of profound peace as we drift quietly through narrow corridors of polished granite. Meredith Davidson, an enthusiastic young scholar, is Curator of 19th and 20th Century Southwest Collection, for the New Mexico History Museum and curated the current permanent exhibition, Setting the Standard: The Fred Harvey Company and its Legacy.
We will have a picnic lunch on site and finish with a visit to a Santa Clara pottery-making family for a demonstration of their famous deep-carved black and red ware, which often features the water serpent, or Avanyu, as well as other symbols and imagery significant to the Tewa villages of the northern Rio Grande.
On our last Southwet Seminars field trip to the North Rim we had a very special porcupine sighting!
These incredible rock carvings include curvilinear, rectilinear, non-representational, irregular, geometric, spirals, starbursts, animal tracks, hunting images, and vision & Dream scenes.
Their mission church and plaza are all part of the accommodation and compartmentalization of different but powerful spiritual forces. Wea€™ll begin our tour 150 miles to the north in the central Mesa Verde region where Chaco probably had its roots. Jews also settled in villages along the western shore of the Bosphorus.GALATA,The area around the Galata Tower in Beyoglu is of prime interest to visitors touring the Jewish interest sites. Sam Duwe, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, University of Oklahoma and Director, Tewa Basin Archaeological Research Project will be a highlight of our trip as he shares knowledge of the Tewa and the region.
Includes 7 full days of activities and 8 nights in favorite lodging in scenic locations, and featuring the interplay and dialogue which accompanies scholarly discussion and debate. Includes Transportation, scholar honorarium, lunch, followed by wine with apps at Conniea€™s Casa (and hoped-for lilacs) before return to Hotel Santa Fe, our pick-up and departure point. Our destination will be a high altitude alpine meadow overlooking the spectacular north rim of the Valles Caldera where we will be served a gourmet fajita picnic lunch with a breathtaking view down into the caldera valley below.
Zolbrod will also introduce us to two Catholic nuns who were part of the effort to create the Crownpoint Rug Auction, now a major cultural tradition and artistic event which you will have the privilege of attending. We will be like trees: silent observers and important witnesses of the continuing strength of culture here today at Zia Pueblo. Sultan Orhan gave them permission to build the Etz ha-Hayyim (Tree of Life) synagogue which remained in service until nineteen forties.Early in the 14th century, when the Ottomans had established their capital at Edirne, Jews from Europe, including Karaites, migrated there. Salahattin Ulkumen, Consul General at Rhodes in 1943-1944, was recognized by the Yad Vashem as a Righteous Gentile "Hassid Umot ha'Olam" in June 1990.
The neighborhood has bustling street life the synagogues have great historical and artictic value,and all sites are within easy walking distance of one another.BALAT,This is another of the quarters in which Jews were settled after their expulsion from Spain enlarging a community which had lived here since Byzantine times.
Turkey continues to be a shelter, a haven for all those who have to flee the dogmatism, intolerance and persecution.
We are proud to offer this unique opportunity, a Must-Do for all lovers of the Southwest culture and landscape, especially when accompanied by such exceptional scholars. Turkey continues to be a shelter, a haven for all those who have to flee the dogmatism, intolerance and persecution. Some of them are very old, especially Ahrida Synagogue in the Balat area, which dates from middle15th century.
All expenses covered coach transportation, admissions, all lodging and meals, donation to tax deductable donation to the Amerind Foundation. Their lives represent an intersection of cultures that they have chosen for their life's work. Lunch included at Conniea€™s Casa in Canoncito at Apache Canyon for debriefing and sharing our adventure stories.
The 15th and 16th century Haskoy and Kuzguncuk cemeteries in Istanbul are still in use today.??The Museum of Turkish Jews??
Though it once has as many as nineteen synagogues,only two of importance remain the famous Ahrida and the neighboring Yanbol. In fact, from the early 15th century on, the Ottomans actively encouraged Jewish immigration.
In these humble surroundings, you will come to respect and understand the Dine and their important connections between people, language, and land.
A letter sent by Rabbi Yitzhak Sarfati (from Edirne) to Jewish communities in Europe in the first part of the century"invited his co-religionists to leave the torments they were enduring in Christiandom and to seek safety and prosperity in Turkey".
Additionally, the Community maintains in Istanbul a school complex including elementary and secondary schools for around 700 students.
Today Ortakoy has become part of the Istanbul metropolis and is a fashionable place to live winter or summer. His discussions and commentary featuring his perspectives on Dine culture will be valuable tools for our own education.
Turkish is the language of instruction, and Hebrew is taught 3 to 5 hours a week.While younger Jews speak Turkish as their native language, the over-70-years-old generation is more at home speaking in French or Judeo-Spanish (Ladino). Though the Jewish orphanage here is gone and the Historic ETZ Ahayim Synagogue building burnt in 1941 and there is stilla synagogue here and many order historic Ottoman sites in the vicinity.PRINCESS ISLANDS,Some historians say the Princes' Islands ,a half hour's voyage southeast of Istanbul in the Sea of Marmara were named for their use as a place of exile for wayward or inconvinent Byzantine princes.



Promo codes olive garden nutrition
How to make pop up flowers out of paper
Dating world globes target