How to do in text citations of website,how to make a new website go viral,how to make a website like facebook 2014,free new chatting site - Plans On 2016

In-Text CitationsAs with other APA Style references, the in-text citations will match the author name(s) and the year. Dear APA Style Experts,I’m a computer science major, and my favorite blog is called Godel’s Lost Letter and P=NP, written by two esteemed computer science experts. First, if you want to mention the blog as a whole, just include a mention of it in parentheses in your text, just as you would for mentioning an entire website. Note: In the first case, the word Blog is capitalized because Blog is part of the name (APA Books Blog). However, if you are quoting or paraphrasing part of a blog post, you should create a reference to that specific post. The name of the blog itself is not part of the reference, although it's often evident from the URL.
YouTube shows the date that the video was posted as March 1, 2013, so that's the date to use in this reference. The author name is TED in this case because the TED organization posted the video to YouTube, and that’s the information your reader needs to retrieve the reference.
Amanda Palmer used examples from her career as a busker and a musician to discuss the sharing economy (TED, 2013).
Note: To learn how to cite individual tweets or posts that include hashtags, see our post on citing social media. The hashtag as an organizational tool wasn’t born on Twitter, but that's where I, and many others, first saw it used that way. That’s because, just like a search of a research database, finding and searching with the right hashtag is part of your research methodology. Of course, in your paper you might also refer to individual tweets, Facebook posts, pictures, or other online items that include hashtags. But, because you've clicked on a post about smart watches, I think you might be interested in this post on how to cite Twitter, Google+, Facebook, and other social media sites. Thanks to developments in technology and feedback from our users, the APA Style team has updated the formats for citing social media, including content from Twitter, Facebook, and Google+. If you discuss any website or page in general in a paper (including but not limited to social media), it is sufficient to give the URL in the text the first time it is mentioned. Finally, if you paraphrase or quote specific, retrievable information from social media, provide an in-text citation (with the author and date) and a reference list entry (with the author, date, title, and source URL). First, provide either an individual author’s real last name and initials in inverted format (Author, A.
Provide the year, month, and day for items that have a specific date associated with them, such as status updates, tweets, photos, and videos; otherwise, provide only the year. If the date is unknown but can be reasonably approximated, use “ca.” (for circa) followed by the approximated year, in square brackets. Provide the name of the page or the content or caption of the post (up to the first 40 words) as the title. Do not italicize the titles of status updates, tweets, pages, or photographs; do italicize the titles of items that stand alone, such as videos and photo albums.
Provide a retrieval URL that leads as directly and reliably to the cited content as possible (click a post’s date stamp to access its archived URL).
For more information on all kinds of electronic references, see the APA Style Guide to Electronic References, Sixth Edition (available in PDF and Kindle formats), as well as the APA Publication Manual.


Podcasts are new—okay podcasts were new about 10 years ago—but the reference format will look familiar. Notice that the “Retrieved from” line includes the homepage URL, not the full URL, of where you found the podcast.
Video podcasts are also new—okay video podcasts were also new about 5 years ago—but you can cite them in the same fashion.
As you might imagine, within the APA Style team, we have a mix of educational backgrounds and interests, with a significant overlap in writing, editing, psychology, and other social sciences. Some time ago, we had a post that explained how to find a DOI and provided a brief YouTube video of the process.
Perhaps the most common question we get about APA Style is “How do I cite a website?” or “How do I cite something I found on a website?” First, to cite a website in general, but not a specific document on that website, see this FAQ.
Once you’re at the level of citing a particular page or document, the key to writing the reference list entry is to determine what kind of content the page has. What seems to flummox our readers is what to do when the content doesn’t fall into an easily defined area.
Sometimes, however, one or more of these four pieces is missing, such as when there is no identifiable author or no date. We have also covered example references for tweets and Facebook updates, press releases, interviews, wikipedia articles, and artwork in other blog posts. In a few weeks, I will update the examples above to include a reference to one comment below. You can create an APA Style reference to any retrievable source, though you should of course consider whether the source is reliable, primary, and timely.
References include the who-when-what-where information that, ideally, allows your reader to find not just the source material but the source exactly where you found it. And, as Chris Messina, who introduced the idea to Twitter, has said, "it's left nerd-dom and now it's out there in the world." Indeed, the hashtag is a common sight on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Vine, Google+, Flickr, Tumblr, Pinterest, Kickstarter, and other platforms. For instance, you might want to quote the most popular Tweet that used the hashtag or just show some representative cases.
These guidelines are the same as you’ll find in our APA Style Guide to Electronic References, Sixth Edition (available in PDF and Kindle formats).
In our first investigation, we analyzed the content of CNN’s Twitter feed during the year 2012. A personal communication citation should be used because there is no direct, reliable path for all readers to retrieve the source. The guidelines below explain how to format each of these elements for any social media citation, and examples follow.
On Twitter, provide the author’s screen name in square brackets (if only the screen name is known, provide it without brackets). To cite social media items not covered here, follow the format that is most similar, and also see our post on what to do if your reference isn’t in the manual. As with other retrievable documents, just follow the basic guidelines for creating a reference: Tell the reader who, when, what, and where.
So when it comes to social media, we’re interested in all types of writing and social science resources. Sometimes the most you can say is that you're looking at information on a page—some kind of article, but not a journal article.


You can download a pdf version of the chart here that lists all the permutations of information that might occur with an online reference and shows how to adapt the reference. I’m also writing a paper for my Introduction to Psychology class, and I want to cite the APA Books Blog. In the first example below, the post was credited to just “Freakonomics” (a screen name for the author or authors of the blog by the same name). For online sources this is particularly important because the presentation and sometimes even the information provided can vary from one online location to the next. If the reasoning behind the wording of the hashtag is not obvious, you might want to elaborate. You can (and should) create references and cite tweets or other online posts that you’ve quoted, paraphrased, or otherwise relied on in a paper. No matter how many we see on your collective wrists in the coming years, we're unlikely to need a new reference format. Ingraham (personal communication, October 5, 2013) stated that she found her career as an educational psychologist intellectually stimulating as well as emotionally fulfilling.
This allows the reference to be associated with and alphabetized alongside any other works by that author.
On Facebook and Google+, when the author is an individual, spell out his or her given name in square brackets. Having a cup of coffee before closing your eyes is the most effective way to combat daytime drowsiness, according to research. A supertelephoto lens allowed Colleen Pinski to capture this image of an annual solar eclipse. In response to that request, we were asked to create tutorials to explain how to cite content from two new databases APA is launching in September. Please celebrate Leap Year Day in the traditional manner by taking a writer out for dinner. Sounds counterintuitive, but it takes 20 minutes for the caffeine to get into your bloodstream.
We currently have hundreds of universities and university libraries in our circles, plus everyone from Grammar Girl and Merriam-Webster to Psychology World to the U.S. The first of these, PsycTESTS, is a research database that provides descriptive and administrative information about tests, as well as access to some psychological tests, measures, scales, and other assessments. PsycTESTS is interesting in that it’s an example of citing the record itself, available only from a unique database, and not the test or supporting literature.
In that runny, nebulous white you’ll find the harder to define content, like blog posts, lecture notes, or maps.
If the blog doesn’t give that level of detail, just include the year or year and month, if that’s all you can find. Follow us to get official updates on all things related to APA Style, including announcements about new blog posts, tips and tricks on writing and style, new features on apastyle.org, and more!



What a woman wants in a man lyrics queen
How to get a husband to communicate quote
Free 3d business cards
LLC PUBLISHING CORP Flatbush Avenue New York City Kings County NY