Thailand dating customs today,free learning websites for 6th graders read,how to make a site your homepage on chrome browser,free download mp3 86 band - 2016 Feature

It is said that you should not visit Thailand until you have seen the rest of the world since Thailand is the place you will keep returning to.
Partly the cause of this, is that Thailand, formerly the Kingdom of Siam, is the one place in South East Asia that as never been colonised by a European power.
Thailand is the 20th largest country in the world, in terms of population, with over 63 million people. A constitutional monarchy since 1932, the King of Thailand is widely revered within the country. Thailand has a very high level of participation in education with a flourishing system of public and private institutions. In 2006, Thailand was plunged into political crisis beginning with protests and then an army coup which deposed elected Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra. Anti-government protestors occupied Government buildings and Thailand's main airport in 2008 protesting against the then Prime Minister, a brother-in-law of Mr. A new wave of anti-government riots broke out in 2008 in Bangkok, this time in support of Mr.
On the 3rd July 2011 Yingluck Shiniwatra sister of ThaksinShinawatra became Thailand's first female Prime Minister and the youngest in sixty years.
THAI SMILE: Many foreigners have labeled Thailand the 'Land of Smiles' because of the polite, friendly and attractive nature of Thai people towards foreigners.
You will find thousands of attractive Thai Ladies and singles seeking soul mates inour Thai Women's Photo Gallery. Thai media photographers take photos and footage of ousted former Thai Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra (pictured on TV) at the Supreme Court in Bangkok. From sophisticated fine dining restaurants to incredible beach parties and Go-Go bars, Koh Samui proudly boasts some of the best nightlife in all of Thailand.
After spending a day on one of the islands stunning beaches or taking part in one of the many activities the island has to offer, the night time offers just as much entertainment as anything you can wish to do during the day. For those who are intent on having a few drinks and really letting their hair down then, then there is no need to worry about finding your way back to your hotel as there are always plenty of taxis on hand ready to take you take you to your hotel once your evening out has finished.
The atmosphere on Koh Samui at night is vibrant, festive and generally good natured, with a good mix of different people seeking out the islands wide range of different night time options. All over the island you will find bars, pubs and other watering holes but it is in the islands popular tourist areas of Chaweng and to a lesser degree, Lamai, where the party really gets going, usually to the wee small hours.
Chaweng often attracts internationally renowned DJ’s to its crowded and popular nightclubs and beach side parties, many of which will last well past the supposed mandatory 2am closing time. Chaweng is also the location of Samui’s oldest nightclub and bar, The Reggae Pub, which is still popular with revellers today. For a more relaxed setting to enjoy some music without the fear of having change into your dancing shoes, then head over to the Sweet n Soul Bar or to many of the bars that are located around the area of the Green Mango. Outside of Chaweng, Lamai offers the next best option in terms of night time entertainment. The evening entertainment that can be found in the other areas of island, most notably in Nathon, Thong Krut and Bang Kao is generally much quieter than Chaweng and Lamai and tends to be limited to bars and restaurants.
The bars in these areas will almost certainly be cheaper than any of the places in Chaweng, which are nearly all aimed at foreign tourists. If you are looking for a really cheap night, where you won’t feel the pinch in your wallet then try Bohput or Maenam. The types of relationships I’ve witnessed that last the longest are those where the man is respectful of who she is and how she was raised, no matter how different that is from his own way of thinking.
Some guys think they’re being taken advantage of because people expect them to always be the one who pays.
However, western culture and other Asian cultures (notably, Japan and Korea), have introduced more liberal views on how a man and woman should act in public. In Thailand, asking what would seem to be personal questions is quite common and not considered rude.
However, because Thais have a different sense of boundaries in terms of what is off-limits, their humor can often seem mean spirited.
For instance, I had an American female friend of mine transiting through Bangkok once and we went out and had a few drinks, at her insistance, in one of Thailand’s notorious red light districts. My friend, in her great wisdom, said, “I sort of get it now, why men love this place so much.
This is not uniquely a Thai thing but Thais view the feet as being the lowest part of the body. If you go to a Buddhist temple, you’ll note that Thais sit with their feet pointing away from the Buddha image. For instance, a Thai friend of mine asked for some help on her English exam that she had scored poorly on.
Description: In 1507, the copper plates used for the 1490 Rome edition of Ptolemya€™s Geographia were reprinted, together with six new maps, either by the printer Bernard Venetus de Vitalibus or the editor Evangelista Tosinus. Although there had been maps created after these voyages, such as Juan de la Cosaa€™s map of the world in 1500 (based on Columbusa€™ second voyage, #305) and the Cantino world map (circa 1502, #306), these maps were not widely known in Europe outside of the professional circles of mariners and government officials for up to fifteen years.
The oldest printed maps showing America (as opposed to one-of-a-kind a€?manuscripta€? or hand-drawn maps) are the world maps of Giovanni Matteo Contarini (#308), the one produced by Martin WaldseemA?ller (#310) and this map by Ruysch.
This map by Ruysch first appeared as an addition to the issue of Ptolemya€™s Geographia, originally published at Rome in 1507 and 1508, together with a commentary written by an Italian monk named Marcus Beneventanus, under the title of Orbis nouo descriptio. Excepting these excerpts, the Orbis nova descriptio of Marcus Beneventanus only contains an exhibition of learning, which is now quite worthless, but which was perhaps necessary, at that time, as an introduction for the new world to her older sisters: Asia, Europe, and Africa. While Ruysch is believed by some historians to have been with John Cabot on his famous voyage of 1497, his map makes no direct mention of the Cabots. There are several advanced features of this map that are the work of a virtually unknown cartographer. With the exception of some small maps based on the cosmographical speculations of the ancients, and inserted in the works of Macrobius, Sacrobosco and others (#201), along with the Contarini and WaldseemA?ller maps (#308 and #310), it is one of the first printed maps representing Africa as a peninsula encompassed by the ocean (Note: the Chinese had been displaying Africa in this manner for over 100 years prior to this map, see #227 and #236). Ruyscha€™s map is the first map published in print on which India is drawn as a triangular peninsula projecting from the south coast of Asia and bordered on the north by the rivers Indus and Ganges.
Zimpangu [Japan], which was shown prominently in mid-Pacific on the Contarini-Rosselli map is omitted completely by Ruysch. Ruysch has produced the first printed map on which the delineation of the interior and eastern parts of Asia is no longer based exclusively on the material collected by Marinus of Tyre and Ptolemy more than a millennium previously, but on more modern reports, especially those of Marco Polo. The exaggerated extension given by Ptolemy to the Mediterranean is much reduced here by Ruysch, from 62 to 53 degrees, the actual difference of longitude between Gibraltar and the western coast of Syria amounting to only 41 or 42 degrees.
The map of Ruysch is the first map published in print that, following a correction made in the portolanos since the beginning of the 14th century, leaves out that excessive projection towards the east, which characterizes Ptolemya€™s map of the northern part of Scotland. In Northern Europe, the church Sancti Odulfi shown on Ruyscha€™s map, is not the church in VardA?, Finnmark, but the cathedral in Trondheim. Ruysch drew his map as a planisphere on a modified equidistant conical projection with its apex at the North Pole which is another remarkable feature. With respect to the New World, the most notable innovation in Ruyscha€™s map is the representation of the western discoveries.
Directly south of Gruenlant the following inscription gives warning of the dangers encountered by fishermen in that region: It is said that those who came formerly in ships among these islands for fish and other food were so deceived by the demons that they could not go on land without danger. Another interesting, but almost illegible, inscription near Gruenlant reads: Hic compassus navium non tenet nec naves quA¦ ferum tenent revertere valent. The Ruysch map is instructive concerning the location of Greenland on late 15th century maps and those of the 16th century. Some of Ruyscha€™s inland Asian data was extrapolated from Poloa€™s description of his trip from Peking to Bengal, which he says he made as an emissary for Kublai Khan. As regards the continental regions south of Newfoundland, and discovered by the Spaniards and Portuguese, Ruysch was clearly of the opinion that they were entirely distinct from Newfoundland or the pseudo Asiatic country which he had visited and delineated; and that they constituted a new world, as yet imperfectly known, particularly regarding its west coast.
Ruyscha€™s map positions a large island in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean between latitude 37 and 40 degrees north. Both Japan and Antilia were described by the influential Italian humanist Paolo Toscanelli in his famous letter of 1474 to King Philip of Portugal, a copy of which Columbus read.
This island of Antilia was discovered by the Portuguese, and now when it is sought it is not found. Later, not having been found in the Atlantic, the Seven Cities were sought on the American mainland, where they remained an elusive goal of riches-hungry Spanish explorers through much of the 16th century. While Ruysch undoubtedly believed that the lands seen by the Cabots and Corte-Reals were part of Asia, he thought that the coasts explored by Columbus, Vincente Pinzon, Cabral, and others belonged to a continent separated from Asia by a stretch of open sea.
The unnamed northwestern continental land in Ruysch is also far less complete than we find it depicted in the Caveri map (#307); and it is certain, from its shape and position, that if Ruyscha€™s prototype had presented a coast line extending, for instance, so far south as 10 degrees north latitude, he would not have cut it off at ten degrees.
Most of Ruyscha€™s Asian data comes from Poloa€™s description of his return to the West from China. From Zaiton they travelled a€?1500 milesa€? across a gulf to a country called Chamba, which is plotted here slightly inland as CIAMBA. On the margin of the map, near the North Pole, is another interesting inscription referring to the magnetic pole, which it is said was first located by the English friar Nicolas de Linna, who made a voyage to the north in 1355 and presented to Edward III of England an account of his discovery, with the title, Inventio fortunat. The basis of the entire Ruysch map, according to the historian Henry Harrisse, was a purely Lusitanian planisphere, similar to those of Cantino and Caveri (#306 and #307), but constructed after the former and before the latter; that is, between 1502 and 1504, as we have shown in a comparative description of the continental region which is north of Central America in Portuguese charts. There are in the section of the map delineating the New World, two very distinct parts, based upon data of similar origin, one of which, however, was modified in a most important respect. But as Ruysch had himself visited the northern part of Newfoundland on board an English vessel, and acquired from experience positive data concerning the situation of that peninsula, as he calls it: qui peninsulae Terra Noua uocatA¦, without having the same reasons as Gaspar Corte Real to place it in the middle of the Atlantic, within the Portuguese Line of Demarcation, Ruysch, following the charts used by his English companions, brought Newfoundland close to the western continent. Terra Nova, one of the earliest uses of this term for the modern Newfoundland, appears as a large peninsula jutting out from the mainland of Asia, although on some copies of the map, because of wear or creases, it may appear to be depicted as an island. This is sometimes interpreted to be another element of British influence, as the variation of the compass orientation had been noted by Cabot on his second voyage.
Meanwhile, it behooves us to show the Portuguese origin of his geographical data, south of what Ruysch names Terra Nova, which, with him, does not mean the New World, or the country newly discovered, but present-day Newfoundland exclusively; in imitation of the English mariners with whom he visited that island.
To that effect, Harrisse compares the nomenclature of the region placed in Ruyscha€™s mappamundi, south of his Terra Nova, with the names inscribed on the northwestern continental land in the Cantino and Caveri maps, both of which are of the Lusitanian map tradition, with no admixture of foreign geographical elements whatever.
Ruysch inscribes thirty-six names on his map, but not one of them is to be found either in the de la Cosa map or in any other Spanish map whatever; while thirty-one out of its whole number are duly set forth either in the Cantino (#306), or Kunstmann No. Ruyscha€™s delineations of the South American continent embrace likewise, the coasts of Venezuela and Honduras, which were discovered by Spanish navigators, who, of course, made maps of their discoveries. The configuration of the continental land that corresponds with the northwestern region of the Cantino map is distorted in that map, but perfectly recognizable on Ruyscha€™s. M Polo says that 1500 miles to the east of the port of Zaiton there is a very large island named Sipagu . In a fascinating example of how a geographic misunderstanding can assume a life of its own, Donald McGuirk has demonstrated how Ruyscha€™s hybrid Hispaniola-Japan was transformed into an atypical representation of Japan four years later by Bernard Sylvanus (#318).
In Ruyscha€™s Caribbean there lies a strange triangular landmass, undefined on its western coast, in the position one would expect to find Cuba. This was one of the first printed maps to show any part of the New World and may also be one of the first to include information on that continent from first-hand knowledge.
In the state that preceded a€?state onea€? there was a smaller island within this space and it was labeled CVBA. The southern coastline of Newfoundland continues directly west to the land of Gog and Magog, and thence south to Cathay. Rather than forgetting Cuba, it is obvious that Ruysch deliberated at great length as to how Cuba should be represented. Below Antilia lies LE XI MIL VIRGINE [(Islands of) the Eleven Thousand Virgins], an early reference to the Virgin Islands named by Columbus for the story of St. On South Americaa€™s northern coast is the GOLFO DE PAREAS that Columbus believed lay at the foothills of Paradise. Nearly blocking the entrance to Columbusa€™ fountainhead of Paradise, the Gulf of Paria, is CANIBALOS IN [Trinidad], introducing to maps the cannibalism which Columbus reported about the Carib islanders.
In this long inscription in the interior of Terra Sancte Crucis sive Mundus Novus here for the first time, Ruysch describes the inhabitants and natural products of the country following the letters of Vespucci and other sources. Portuguese navigators have inspected this part of this land, and have sailed as far as the fiftieth degree of south latitude without seeing the southern limit of it.
As far as this Spanish navigators have come, and they have called this land, on account of its greatness, the New World.
On the east coast of South America is the interesting name Abatia Aµniu sactoru, or All Saints Abbey.
Then, where did Ruysch pick up the egregious mistake that transformed A baia de todos Sanctos [All-Saints Bay] into Abatia omnium Sanctorum [AIl Saints Abbey]? Thus far the Spanish sailors have come, and because of its magnitude they call it a new world, for indeed they have not seen the whole of it nor at this time have they explored beyond this limit.
The Portuguese, of course, had also a€?come this far.a€? Their discovery of Brazil in 1500 was significant because it was rich in trade potential and because it clearly lay on their side of the papal demarcation line. The Ruysch map is classified by the historian Henry Harrisse as a Type III within the Lusitano-Germanic Group of new world maps (the only specimen that Harrisse places in this Type). While one of the more widely circulated of all the printed maps from this period, none have exercised so little influence over the cartography of the New World as this mappamundi. As mentioned above, Ruyscha€™s world map more usually appears in the 1508 printing of the Rome Ptolemy. It is evident, from what has already been said, that Ruysch deserves to be placed in the first rank among the reformers of cartography.
Beans, George H., a€?The Ruysch World map in its earliest known state,a€? Imago Mundi V (1948), 72.
Swan, B., a€?The Ruysch Map of the World (1507-1508),a€? Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America 45 (1951), 219-236. The oldest printed maps showing America (as opposed to one-of-a-kind a€?manuscripta€? or hand-drawn maps) are the world maps of Giovanni Matteo Contarini (#308), the one produced by Martin WaldseemA?ller (#310) and this map by Ruysch.A  While Contarinia€™s and WaldseemA?llera€™s maps, printed as individual sheets, have fallen victim to the ravages of time, and only a single copy of each is known to have survived, a number of copies of Ruyscha€™s map, which was printed as a plate in an atlas, are preserved today. De ‘wai’ (spreek uit: waai) is in Thailand een traditionele manier van begroeten en het tonen van respect.
De wai wordt gevormd door de vingertoppen en handpalmen tegen elkaar te houden, deze vervolgens tegen de borst te houden en hierbij een lichte buiging te maken.
Vaak wordt er tijdens het maken van de wai het woord ‘sawatdee’ (spreek uit: sa-wat-dee) gesproken.
De wai wordt in Thailand gebruikt om mensen te begroeten, te bedanken en om afscheid te nemen. Wie bij een begroeting of afscheid als eerst de wai maakt is afhankelijk van de sociale status van de betrokkenen. Monniken en leden van de Koninklijke familie hebben in Thailand een hoge maatschappelijke status en zullen daarom een wai niet beantwoorden. Para los tailandeses la comida es un acto social, donde compartir con los suyos un momento del dia, en este aspecto los espanoles nos parecemos mucho.
Tenemos la idea de que toda Asia come con palillos, pues no los tailandeses no comen con palillos comen con cuchara y tenedor principalmente, utilizan el tenedor para acompanar la comida a la cuchara y a la boca. Una cucharada de un plato tailandes es la combinacion perfecta entre todos sabores reconocibles del paladar humano, es el equilibrio casi perfecto entre el picante, el dulce, el amargo y el agrio… Es la magia que crean con sus ingredientes, sus salsas y especies para conseguir ese gusto tan peculiar que caracteriza su cocina. Los tallarines, tambien llamados noodles, que pueden ser de arroz, de maiz, de trigo y los combinan con verduras, con marisco, picantes, sin picar, con cerdo….
Las especies son su mas preciado tesoro: curry, cilantro, albahaca, jengibre, ajo, tamarindo…Cada uno de ellos en su cantidad exacta para crear ese punto tan distinguido. La leche de coco, azucar de coco, las hojas de lima, las guindillas, estan a la orden del dia.


Y que os parece hoy para empezar la semana tranquilitos en casa, os dais el capricho de pedir comida Tailandesa, en el Thai Loungey disfrutais de este mar de sabores. The extraordinary culture and tradition of the country is shaped by Buddhism and is also very much alive in everyday Thai life.
The Asian financial crisis in 1997 resulted in severe economic collapse resulting in the effective de-valuation of the Thai currency, the baht. King Bhumibol, the ninth in the Chakri dynasty which has ruled Thailand since 1782, is the nation's longest serving monarch.
The Thai tradition of respect for elders and learning contributes to an impressive commitment to education within the country.
It is estimated that out of 10 million or so people living in Bangkok (or Krung Thep) that nearly 400,000 are sex workers.
Despite a new constitution and successful elections in 2007, the political problems, which led to the 2006 coup, still exist. Her government faces stiff opposition from the same forces that led the political movement against her brother. With Samui being an island that mainly caters towards hospitality, entertainment and having fun, the abundance of activities and things to do that can be found here, certainly doesn’t end once it goes dark. There really is something from everyone including nightclubs, beer bars, traditional Thai dancing, live music venues, Muay Thai boxing and even mud wrestling!
If you are really worse for wear then you could always spend the night sleeping in the beach, although isn’t recommended! From refined bars and cocktail lounges to raucous nightclubs and just about everything in between, everyone is there for a good time and to experience the islands fabulous nightlife. The Green Mango, for example, which is probably Samui’s largest and most popular bar and disco can often remain open well past 2am. Playing an eclectic mix of chilled out reggae music, before the funky house beats take over as the crowds pile in, whilst the clock gets closer to midnight. For a less raucous evening, but certainly not lacking in any flair, give Zico’s a try and witness some of their authentic Brazilian samba dancers in action. Whilst there is an established night time scene, both of these areas tend to attract are more local crowd, which is predominantly made up of expats who live on the island.
Seems either no one is talking about louis daguerre at this moment on GOOGLE-PLUS or the GOOGLE-PLUS service is congested. In addition to the new regional maps, this rare new map of the world by Johann Ruysch is sometimes found in advance of its normal appearance in the Ptolemy atlas the following year.
Only a few copies of these maps survive not simply because they were manuscript rather than printed maps, but also because they were often regarded as state secrets. It is at any rate a remarkable fact that every time Beneventanus deigns to descend from his pedestal of learning, he communicates a fact of great importance to the history of geographical discovery. Johannes Ruysch was born around the year 1460 in Utrecht, which is now located in the Netherlands.
Cape Race, which appeared on La Cosaa€™s map (#305) as Cavo de Ynglaterra, on Ruyscha€™s map is called C. Apart from the fact that Ruysch was from Utrecht and sojourned in Cologne, little is known of him. The southern point of Africa moreover is here placed on a nearly correct latitude, thus giving a tolerably exact form to that part of the world. Even though it has not yet received its full extension as a peninsula, yet an important deviation from Ptolemya€™s geography is thus made on the map to a part of the world to which almost a privilegium exclusivum of knowledge was attributed to the ancients. Various new names are here added in Scytia intra Imaum, such as Tartaria Magna and Wolha [Volga], and an immense, quite new territory, an Asia extra Ptolemaeum, or Asia Alarci Pauli Veneti, is added beyond the eastern limits of Ptolemya€™s oikumene [known world]. In its plane state the map appears as an opened fan with the curved, or southern edge, at the bottom. Ruysch depicts the North Polar regions with some geographical basis for the first time and it is believed that the famous Gerhard Mercator was influenced by the map when he prepared the circular inset of the Arctic on his great world map of 1569 (#407).
However, his map is also a mixture of tradition, new information, and misleading conjecture. An inscription describing nearby islands warns that sailors who had gone to them had been tricked by demons. He labels the waters within the four islands as the Mare Sugenum, and speaks of a violent whirlpool that sucks the incoming waters down into the earth; in addition, his map shows a ring of small, very mountainous islands around the four islands, which numerous islands Ruysch says are uninhabited.
Ruysch judges Poloa€™s TOLMA[N], a region later reincarnated in the New World as part of the Northwest Coast, to lie just south of the realm of Gog and Magog. This coast Ruysch could not admit to be connected in any manner with as he already depicts in detail the eastern Asiatic seaboards, from the point where they merge with his northern regions, to 39 degrees south latitude, which is the termination of the map. In this island are people who speak the Spanish tongue, and who in the time of King Roderick are believed to have fled to this island from the barbarians who at that time invaded Spain. Near the island of Spagnola [Haiti] and south of the island of Antilia is an inscription that tells the story of that island as given on Behaima€™s globe (Book III, #258). Marco, Maffeo, and Niccolo Polo, long detained at the pleasure of Kublai Khan, were allowed to return to Europe when sent as the personal escorts of a bride for Arghun, khan of the Levant [Persia]. Ruysch designates its coast as SILVA ALOE [aloe forest] for the valuable plant which Polo said the king of Chamba offered as part of his annual tribute to the Kublai Khan. However, theses dates are obviously not correct given the notations on the map of the Portuguese discoveries of 1507. On all other maps of the first half of the 16th century, even on the Cabot map of 1544, it is represented as a group of islands.
More likely, however, the legend originated in a medieval treatise, the same from which Ruysch configured his Arctic region. Harrisse establishes a similar comparison between Ruyscha€™s South America and the latter continent in all of the seven world charts, now known, which circulated in Europe when he constructed his mappamundi. No such designation as the a€?Land of the Holy Crossa€? was ever adopted in Spain for Brazil, or written on any map by the Spanish pilots or geographers of that time. Glaciato on the eastern coast suggests the work of the Italian editor and Baia de Rockas shows the influence of English associations. This island lies between 45A° and 55A° east of the coast of Asia, just above the Tropic of Cancer. But a€?Cubaa€? does not appear as such, and historians have long been puzzled by Ruyscha€™s apparent omission of the island. It has long been recognized that there were corrections to the plates of this map even before the earliest known example, state one - thus the importance of examining an early strike of the map, to better discern these changes. The vestige of DE CVBA is still discernable, as is part of the coastline of its original (insular?) geography.
The stippled lines which represent ocean spill well into the current landmass, both in the north and south. From the Biblical land of Gog and Magog the people of the Middle Ages expected the coming of destructive races at the last day.
Near the island of Spagnola [Haiti] and south of the island of Antilia is an inscription that tells the story of that island as given on Behaima€™s globe (#258).
It has long been recognized that there were corrections to the plates of this map even before the earliest known example, state one. In the state that preceded state one there was a smaller island within this space and it was labeled CVBA.
After first choosing to represent it as a small island, he then changed his mind and used the outline of the a€?North Americana€? continental landmass on Portuguese manuscript charts akin to the Cantino map (#306), only in smaller dimensions, to represent Cuba on his map.
This a€?Land of the Holy Crossa€? also contains the term MUNDUS NOVUS, one of the first references to a a€?New Worlda€? on a printed map. Columbus reached this fancy when attempting to explain the variation of the North Star, noted by him near the Gulf of Paria. It is interesting to note that on State I of the Ruysch map Canibali designated LA DOMINICA [the island of Dominica] instead, which was one of the islands Columbus said was inhabited by that reputably fierce race. This country, which is generally considered another continent, is inhabited in scattered settlements.
Not in Spanish charts, certainly, but in a Lusitano-Germanic map, manipulated by a northern cartographer who had read the Latin version of the four voyages of Vespucci, printed at St.
In 1507 the Pacific, still simply the a€?Orientala€? or a€?Chinaa€? Sea, had never been sighted from the American side and had only been cursorily approached from the Asian side. Therefore this map is left incomplete for the present, since we do not know in which direction it trends. There are, both in the Ruysch and Caveri (#307) maps, geographical representations and names showing that their prototypes differed in important respects from Cantino. We have never seen its configurations reproduced anywhere; and it is only mentioned twice in the first half of the 16th century.
The first of a series on geographical misconceptions,a€? The Map Collector 2 (March 1978), pp. Het is een unieke en gracieuze handeling welke een belangrijke rol speelt in de Thaise etiquette. Hoe hoger de handen naar het gezicht toe worden gehouden en hoe dieper de buiging, des te groter het respect of eerbied er wordt gegeven. Dit wordt gedaan voordat het cadeau wordt aangenomen. Vaak wordt er door de Thai ook een wai gemaakt bij het passeren van een Boeddhistisch monument.
Wanneer de tekens niet duidelijk zijn, kunt u een nieuwe afbeelding krijgen door de ronde pijl linksboven aan te klikken. Ellos ademas, de ver la comida como acto social, consideran la comida como un arte por lo que decoran sus platos con vegetales tallados en forma de flores o hacen filigranas con los postres para que la apariencia sea exquisita. En la mesa se sirven los  distintos platos que se han escogido, de los cuales cada comensal va sirviendose  y combinando los distintos sabores.
La media de arroz consumido por un tailandes es de 158 kilos por ano, no hace falta mencionar pues la importancia que tiene este ingrediente.
El Thai Lounge es uno de los restaurantes tailandeses mas fieles al sabor original del pais, de la ciudad condal.
The unique identity of Thailand, warm climate and the attractiveness of the people make it irresistibly unique to millions of foreigners. Since then, however, Thailand has remained an emerging economy with an impressive export performance despite political turmoil which erupted in 2006. The love felt by Thai people towards the King is difficult for most foreigners to comprehend. This government was subsequentlydissolved by the constitutional court and a new government installed. That’s before you even consider the huge choice of superb restaurants and eateries that can be found all over the island. As well as nightclubs and a wide variety of beer bars, Lamai is also famous for its raunchy ladies mud wrestling contests and lady boy shows! Whilst it will almost certainly be cheaper than going out in the West, drinking in many of the bars and clubs in Chaweng and Lamai will not be that much different, in terms of price, to what you would normally pay in Europe or the UK, for example. It is not enumerated in the table of contents of the 1507 edition and it must be assumed that Ruyscha€™s drawing came into the engraver's hands late in the year, just in time to be engraved and inserted into some of the copies then printed.
This situation changed drastically from 1506 to 1507 when three separate efforts to produce world maps were published. This must be noted, as it constrains us to limit our interpretation of the geographical configurations and legends to the map itself.
He thus incidentally informs us that the author of this map, which from a geographical point of view marks an epoch in cartography more distinctly than any other that has ever been published in print, had joined in a voyage from England to America.
Ruysch may therefore have drawn on first-hand knowledge in producing a map that is independent of the Contarini-Rosselli map of 1506, although there are a number of similar characteristics. Ruysch also gives on his map a relatively correct place to the Insule ae Azores, Insula de Madera, Ins. The Indian peninsula on the Ruysch map now has significantly more names on both the west and east coasts than the Contarini-Rosselli map (#308) and, further east, Ruysch recognizes that the old Ptolemaic coastline can no longer apply. Here the Chinese river-system is given in a manner indicating other sources for the geography of eastern Asia, than Marco Poloa€™s written words. The first cartographer who adopted Ruyscha€™s reduction, was the celebrated Gerard Mercator. Some of the lettering is also unusual as it appears to have been made by a punch rather than the usual burin engraving tool. Inland from North America, into Ruyscha€™s a€?Asiaa€? proper, the influence of the medieval imagination is found in the dreaded realm of Gog and Magog from which the Antichrist would spring at Armageddon.
South of TOLMA lies the mountainous country of TEBET [Tibet, but actually in present-day Sze-cha€™wan and YA?n-nan], which a€?is terribly devastated, for it was ravaged in a campaign by Mongu Khan . Here dwelt an archbishop with six other bishops, each one of whom had his own particular city.
Groves of trees yielding a black wood, which Polo said was used for making chessmen and pen-cases, are noted by Ruysch as SILVA EBANI [ebony forest].
Originally, the region was delineated nearly as we see it in Cantino, and in all the Lusitano-Germanic maps. The use of the name Insula Baccalauras on the coast of Terra Nova is one of the earliest instances of the appearance on any map of the American coast of that Romance word for codfish, baccallaos. The use of the letter a€?ka€? in this a€?Rocky Baya€? is one of the mapa€™s scant traces of the British flag under which Ruysch is believed to have sailed. Along the Asian coast facing this whirlpool arctic is IUDEI INCLUSI, where the lost tribes of Israel were thought to dwell. This is shown by the fact that none of his designations for the Honduras, Venezuela, and Guyana coasts are to be found among the fifty names inserted along those sea-boards by Juan de la Cosa, who was one of the discoverers; nor even in the nomenclature of the Ribero map (#346) and other official quantity of cosmographers, who must have followed, in that respect, though it was twenty-five years later, the traditions of the Spanish school. He depicts no island, whether named a€?Isabellaa€? or otherwise, between that northern continent and Hispaniola.
Ruyscha€™s problem was that two of his prime sources of data a€” the recent Spanish expeditions, and Marco Polo a€” both located an island at that spot. In his scholarly work, The Continent of America, John Boyd Thacher made this comment regarding the Ruysch map; a€?The mystery of this map a€” and every early map boasted its mystery a€” is the absence of the island of Cuba from its place in the Caribbean Seaa€?. It is astonishing to think that a map which was published only once, over a period of one or two years, had so many revisions (at least six).
Thus the importance of examining an early strike of the map, to better discern these changes. Whether this second configuration represents combined information from Columbusa€™ first two voyages, data gained from Amerigo Vespuccia€™s a€?firsta€™ voyage, an early description of the Yucatan, or some other source has been, and will continue to be, a matter of great debate.
Another inherited tradition involving the a€?fairer sexa€? is found in the island of MATININA to the south.
South America is mapped through the Gulf of Venezuela, with the Guahira Peninsula shown as an island (TAMARA QUA).
Columbusa€™ association of Paria with Paradise was reinforced by the fact that there he encountered four rivers emptying into the gulf, corresponding to the number of rivers commonly believed to flow from Paradise.
While at Dominica on the Second Voyage, a colleague of Columbus wrote that a€?these islands are inhabited by Canabili, a wild, unconquered race which feeds on human flesh.
The name a€?Americaa€? had been suggested only the previous year by WaldseemA?ller (#310), and it is possible that Ruysch had not heard of the suggestion when he made his map or for some reason he did not care to follow it.
Die in Lorraine, in May, 1507, and where we see Omnium sanctorum abbatiam, while all the Spanish maps properly inscribe, Baya de todos sanctos (Turin and Weimar charts).


Vincent of Vespuccia€™s third voyage (1501-02), hence the name of the mountains shown just inland by Ruysch.
The Asiatic coasts are different; the nomenclature presents also a number of names that are in one and not in the other two, and vice versa. The legends on this map are consequently of very high interest, and form a more important contribution to the history of geography than many a bulky volume. Wanneer iemand in Thailand een wai voor je maakt, kun je deze als buitenlander het beste beantwoorden met een hoofdknik of een glimlach. Op kinderen hoeft een wai niet beantwoord te worden omdat van hen verwacht wordt dat ze altijd respect tonen aan volwassenen. Los tailandeses siempre piden un plato picante y otro no picante, que van combinando, para poder calmar el fuego que provoca el picante en la boca. The main hub for nightlife in Lamai can be found in and around the areas of the Round Bars and the Night Plaza. An inscription on the map just off Taprobana refers to the voyages of the Portuguese to that area in the year 1507. The Contarini-Rosselli map of 1506 (#308) and Martin WaldseemA?llera€™s map of the world and globe of 1507 (#310 and #311) were very influential, but not very widely published. Marcus adds nothing whatever as regards facts and data; instead, his treatise is less complete, considering that he fails to mention either Cuba or the continental land which the map exhibits between Newfoundland and South America.
Both maps are on fan-shaped conical projections, engraved on copper in typical Italian style, and select from a variety of Spanish, Portuguese, and earlier sources.
In its main features the delineation of eastern Asia, to the south of latitude 60 degrees north, on the map of Ruysch, so nearly resembles Behaima€™s globe (#258), that a common original might have served for both. On his famous map ad usum Navigantium of 1569 (#406), he gives the Mediterranean Sea a length of 52 degrees. This suggests that the map was prepared for press in a hurry and the punch used as the quickest method of lettering the plate. Ruysch correctly draws Gruenlant [Greenland] as separate from Europe, not connected with Europe by a vast polar continent as some earlier maps indicate. Originally a Biblical saga, the story of these two malevolent creatures developed a rich mythology through medieval lore.
In like manner, there is a second peninsula above Norway that usually represents Greenland Island (G) on most maps of the period. Wherefore this island is called by many a€?seven cities.a€? This people lived most piously in the full enjoyment of all the riches of this time. The historian Varnhagen maintained that it was the land seen by Vespucci on his disputed voyage of 1497. This coast was called a€?Labradora€™s Landa€? as it was first sighted by the Portuguese, JoA?o Fernandes, the a€?llabradora€? or laborer, whom John Cabot had brought with him from the Azores, where he had gone the previous summer to recruit skilled seamen for his crew.
This can be seen simply by comparing the eastern profile of the Terra del Rey de portugall (present-day Newfoundland) in Cantino and the King-Hamy (#307.1), with the profile of the Terra Nova of Ruysch, which is exactly the same region. There is no certain authority for the statement sometimes made that the term was first applied in the west by the Cabots nor for the assertion by Peter Martyr that the word was found by Europeans in use among the natives of Terra Nova.
In the Atlantic between Ireland and Greenland lies an island with an inscription stating that this island in the year of our Lord 1456 was totally consumed by fire.
But the Spaniards always, and justly, claimed to have discovered that country, as Pinzon had sighted and actually taken possession of the land situated by 8A° 19a€™ south latitude, three months before.
For Columbus it was the island of Hispaniola [modern-day Haiti and the Dominican Republic]. Indeed, many scholars of early New World cartography have debated the meaning of this oversight on Ruyscha€™s part. Obviously the printers were taking great care to ensure that it was accurate and up to date. It can be surmised that Ruysch was confused by Columbusa€™ insistence that Cuba was the eastern tip of a continental Asian promontory; Columbus, on his second voyage (1493-94), went so far as to force his officers to make sworn statements that Cuba was such a peninsula, in effect the Aurea Chersonesus or Cattigara of Ptolemy. This outline continues within the current landmass except to the northwest, where it extends into the ocean as a faint but obvious serpentine line.
No trace of Columbusa€™ fourth voyage (1502-03), in which he stumbled across Central America, is found on Ruyscha€™s map. Pierre Da€™Ailly had declared that there was a€?a fountain in the Terrestrial Paradise which waters the Garden of Delights and which flows out by four rivers,a€? and Columbus himself annotated his copy of the Imago Mundi with a€?Fons est in paradisoa€? [a fountain is in Paradise].
I would be right to call them anthropophagi.a€? That Ruysch, on the later states of his map.
We here obtain notices regarding exploring-voyages undertaken before 1508, of which no other information is met with in the history of geographical discovery.
Vespucci said this cape lies eight degrees south of the equator (modern-day Recife), and that thence sailing southwest along the coast they encountered friendly Indians a€?gazing in wonder at us and at the great size of our ships.a€? Vespucci remarked that a few of the Indians, taken a€?to teach us their tongue,a€? volunteered to return to Portugal with them. If you are looking for live music venues then head over to the Bikers and Rockers Pub, which is famous throughout the island for live rock shows.
This enlarged map of the known world constructed from recent discoveries, engraved on copper, is one of the earliest printed maps showing the discoveries in the new world. There is only one original copy of each map in existence today, and both of these copies were discovered in the 20th century.
It is even doubtful whether the Celestinian monk, or any of the parties engaged in the publication of the Ptolemy of 1507-1508, had any personal intercourse with Ruysch. By this name he probably designates either the illegitimate son of Columbus, Ferdinand, who sojourned in Europe until his 19th year (1509), or rather the brother of Columbus, Bartholomew, who seems to have been an eminent cartographer. The African continent on the map is yet another cartographic advance as it breaks with the early tradition which held that there was a land-bridge between eastern African and the peninsula of Southeast Asia. Sri Lanka, under the name of Prilam, is also laid down by Ruysch with about its proper size, and correctly as regards the southern point of India. Both deviate from Fra Mauroa€™s map of the world (#249), which gives us a representation of these regions much inferior to both Behaim and Ruysch. Ruyscha€™s map is also the first printed map on which, in conformity with the drawings on the portolanos, a tolerably correct direction is given to the northern coast of Africa, by attending to the considerable difference of latitude between the coastlines to the east and to the west of Syrtis, and by giving a proper form to that bay.
So, it was in place long before Ruysch made his map, and to be true, no one knows from what saint it was named.
Instead of connected with Europe, he links Greenland with Asia through Newfoundland (Terra Nova).
Gog and Magog were traditionally imprisoned behind the Caspian gates by Alexander the Great; belief in the menace was so great that the level-headed Roger Bacon hoped that the study of geography might predict when, and from what direction, their onslaught might come in the days of the Antichrist so as better to prepare to defend against them.
Above this is Hyperborea Europa (H) which is a carryover from the Norveca Europa of the de Virga map of 1414 (#240) where it was presumed the Hyperboreans lived near the North Pole.
Sailing seven hundred miles south-south-west from Chamba the traveler, says Polo, passes two uninhabited islands, Ruyscha€™s SODVR and CANDVR.
Turning north, a€?they had,a€? says Peter Martyr, a€?in a manner continual daylight.a€? The action of the compass in those high latitudes might well cause the alarm expressed in the above inscriptions. By 1506 Portuguese fishermen were hauling so much cod from northern American waters that their monarch sought tariffs on its import.
Here the compasses of the ships lose their power, and it is not possible for ships which have iron on board to return. It is tempting to suggest that this is an epitaph for the fabulous island of Brasil from Irish legend. The other six originated in Portugal, and were delineated during the first few years of the 16th century. They consequently never accepted its Lusitanian name, and invariably called that region Tierra del Brasil. Henry Harrisse, in his book, The Discovery of North America, states that as early as 1526 Franciscus Monachus criticized the Ruysch map for its depictions in the Caribbean Sea. Apparently much soul- searching was done in the choosing of its delineations, especially in regard to the New World. Within this smaller island, and to the left of the name CORVEO are found the faint letters DE CV Under the small triangle preceding the name CORVEO is the letter B and under the following C the letter A is found. At the southern end of South America another inscription states that the Portuguese had sailed as far south as 50A° latitude without seeing the southern limit of the land, possibly also a reference to Vespuccia€™s third voyage. Contact all personals free .Dating back before the 7th century in England and Iceland, the custom of water burial has morphed into many different meanings over the years.
By contrast, Johannes Ruyscha€™s 1508 map of the world was much more widely published and many copies were produced and still exist.
Otherwise we would certainly find in the elaborate description that Marcus Beneventanus gives of the transatlantic discoveries of the Spaniards and Portuguese, some statement or name that should have been omitted in the map. For there is an annotation on a copy of: Paesi nouvamente retrovaetc, Vicentia 1507, at the library Magliabechi, stating that Bartholomew, when visiting Rome in 1505, wrote, for a canon of the church of San Giovanni di Laterano, a narrative of the first voyage across the ocean, to which a map of the new discoveries was appended.
It is thought (see the Beneventanus commentary below) that he accompanied John Cabot on his expedition to North America in 1497 and 1498, or, considering the prevalence of Portuguese names on his 1507 map, a Portuguese ship leaving from Bristol. Ruysch adopts the Portuguese name, Terra Sancte Crucis [Land of the Holy Cross] for South America instead of Tierra del Brazil, the name used by the Spaniards. It is also the first map that shows the Portuguese discoveries and landfalls along the southern and Cape coasts. Taprobana is placed further towards the East Indian peninsula, in which position this geographical remnant from the time of Alexander the Great was retained, down to the middle of the 16th century. Neither is it any reason for thinking that the island above Norway is meant to be Svalbard. In addition, he shows the northern polar regions as a basin with a number of islands, thus prompting the long-held hope for a Northwest passage from Europe to Asia. This threat was quite real to Columbus, who figured himself prominently into the events, believed by him to be close at hand, leading to the end of the world. Across the vertical ocean or Ginnungagap (GP) is a caption that cautions mariners not to rely upon compass bearings as the compass fails in this region. Among the Polean islands lying further to the south on Ruyscha€™s map is AGAMA, which like TOLMA would later be transposed to the New World as a region of the Northwest Coast. The evidence that the landfall of the Cabots was Greenland and not Labrador is cited by Biggar. There are forests, mountains and rivers: there is the greatest abundance of pearls and gold.
The few personal details given by the commentator and by Thomas Aucuparius in the preface were most probably conveyed by a letter accompanying the map when it was sent in manuscript from Germany to Rome. His general accuracy in the eastern hemisphere is almost certainly due to contemporary information gained from Portuguese navigators and explorers. Ruysch seems to have had no doubt that Gruenlant was a part of Asia and not of Europe as usually represented on maps of this period.
In the gulf formed by North America and the ominous land of Gog and Magog lies the Spanish Main, the Caribbean, which in Ruyscha€™s mind was really the China Sea. Usually, maps had this caption southwest of Greenlanda€”thus one may be on good grounds for identifying the land here called Grvenlant as Labrador (L).
Mixing Polean, Portuguese, and Ptolemaic data, Ruysch charts a JAVA MAJOR and LAVA MINOR, Poloa€™s Java and Sumatra respectively. Ruysch uses the term to designate the entire peninsula of North America, and names its most southeasterly point as C.
Cannibalism had, though, been reported independently by early mainland explorers, such as Vespucci, perhaps rendering the Trindad association more plausible in Ruyscha€™s mind. According to the historian Henry Harrisse, if Ruysch had supervised the engraving in person, the probability is that the nomenclature would have been entirely in Latin, or according to its original Portuguese form, instead of being so frequently Italianized, as is seen in the pronoun a€?doa€?, everywhere written a€?dea€?, and in the words Terra secca, C.
This may be a notice respecting the same map, that Marcus Beneventanus had seen with a€?Columbus Nepos,a€? and which appears to have been partly copied by Ruysch, whose map consequently may be regarded as a direct illustration of the ideas prevailing in the family of Columbus as to the distribution of the continents and oceans of the globe.
Off the coast of Gruenlant is the location of an island that was totally consumed by fire in the year of our Lord, 1456. Since most historians have assumed this is simply another frivolous naminga€”we can understand the controversy over whether the Spanish navigator Fernandez (The Labrador) actually discovered Greenland or Labrador. He creates a a€?moderna€? Sri Lanka [PRILAM] from Portuguese sources but exiles the old TAPROBANA, the Sri Lanka or Ceylon of Ptolemy, to the east, giving it both the old and new names (TAPROBANA ALIAS ZOILON), and mistakenly notes the 1507 Portuguese landfall in Sri Lanka by it rather than by Prilam. Popularly it was also called La terra dagli Papaga [Parrotsa€™ Land], on account of those large and beautiful birds that Gaspar de Lemos brought to Portugal. Then it is more probable that this feature of the map is inspired by the Inventio Fortunatae, or from the fact that the old cartographers wanted the landmasses to be in balance. Glaciato and Capo formoso, which certainly indicate a translation of Portuguese names, made not by a German, but by an Italian, without being errors of the engraver. The one inscription to the left of India states that this sea, which on the Ptolemaic maps was represented as landlocked (#119), was shown by the Portuguese to be connected with the ocean. On the other hand, we know that several cartographers identified North American mainland as a€?Greenlanda€? so the label for Labrador on this map is not so unusual. De Fundabril on the peninsula extending toward Spagnola is suggestive of Cuba as that name was given by Columbus, on his second voyage, to a cape on the coast of Cuba which he left the on the 30th of April. He is thought to be the a€?Fleming called Johna€?, a close friend of Raphael who at one point resided with him. On Taprobane (alias Zoilon), which almost corresponds to the immense island currently called Sumatra, there is a long legend, partly borrowed from Ptolemy, but with the interesting addition that Portuguese mariners arrived there in 1507. On the scroll upon the west coast of this unnamed land is the inscription: As far as this the ships of Ferdinand have come. South of JAVA MINOR [Sumatra] an inscription refers to an archipelago of precisely 7,448 islands reported by Polo, probably the Philippines but here suggesting Indonesia. BACCALAURAS [codfish island], testifying to that fisha€™s profound influence on early Atlantic exploration. Crvcis, but Cabo de Santa Maria de la Consolacion which is the name given to that cape by Pinzon on January 26, 1500, or Rostro Hermoso, as he also, if not de Lepe, named it. It has been suggested that he assisted and advised Raphael on his 1509-1510 Astronomia and other frescoes in the Stanza della segnatura.
Another legend on the southeastern parts of Asia alludes to the existence of numerous islands in that part of the ocean, of which notices from Indian merchants seem to have already reached Europe. This term, in its sundry Romance variations, soon became a major place-name associated with North America.
Not long after, Ruysch went to work at the Portuguese court as cartographer and astronomer, presumably by recommendation of Julius II who was a friend of Manuel I of Portugal.
This Portuguese influence may be due only to the fact that Portuguese charts, while kept in great secrecy, were more numerous than Spanish ones.
This comment, as well as the rivera€™s latitude and its probable origin in the Corte-Real voyages, all suggest that this is the Gulf of St. The adjacent features also make sense in this interpretation; C GLACIATO (a reference to glacial waters) would be Newfound-land, C DE PORTOGESI would be Nova Scotia, and IN BACCALAURAS would be Cape Breton or Prince Edward Island. This Chinese Li was by the European cartographers confounded with the Italian mile (60 = 1 degree).



Quotes to say i love you forever
When a man loves a woman korean episode guide
Free digital magazine publishing software