Want to make website on google,tips for a job interview at chipotle mean,advice on relationships with age difference of - .

Worst of all Barbie would have to walk on all fours with her 6 inch ankles and size 3 feet that are unable to support the weight of her spider long legs. Barbie’s body and lifestyle tells us a lot about what society believes a woman should be. The running head is typed on the line below the page header, flush left, in UPPERCASE, following the words "Running head:". Beneath the title, center the name(s) of the author(s), and their institutional affiliations.
Instructors for undergraduate courses often require that the course name, instructor name, and date of submission be included on the cover page. Check with your instructor or graduate school to clarify any differences between their specific requirements and those of Standard APA Format for cover pages (as described above). An abstract should be a brief summary of the paper's primary premise and findings, no more than 120 words. For the abstract page, center the word "Abstract" at the top of the page, and then include the abstract for the paper, double spaced, and flush against the left margin.
A quotation of less than 40 words should be enclosed in double quotation marks and should be incorporated into the sentence. Longer quotations should be set apart from the surrounding text, without quotation marks, in block format, indented five spaces from the left margin, and double spaced. In block quotations, use double quotation marks to indicate that a phrase is a direct quote. Use an ellipsis to indicate that a portion of the quotation has been omitted: three periods with spaces before and after when the words have been omitted in the middle of a sentence, four periods (with spaces before and after) when the end of a sentence has been left out.
Remember that all quotations, as well as paraphrased text from your research materials must be properly cited. If the author(s) names are mentioned in the same sentence, include only the year of publication. Put the cursor in your paper where the intext citation should be placed, then go to Citation. Type footnotes on a separate page, with the title "Footnotes" centered at the top of the page. Teens share a wide range of information about themselves on social media sites;1 indeed the sites themselves are designed to encourage the sharing of information and the expansion of networks. Teens are sharing more information about themselves on social media sites than they did in the past.
Teen Twitter use has grown significantly: 24% of online teens use Twitter, up from 16% in 2011.
The typical (median) teen Facebook user has 300 friends, while the typical teen Twitter user has 79 followers. Focus group discussions with teens show that they have waning enthusiasm for Facebook, disliking the increasing adult presence, people sharing excessively, and stressful “drama,” but they keep using it because participation is an important part of overall teenage socializing. 60% of teen Facebook users keep their profiles private, and most report high levels of confidence in their ability to manage their settings. Teens take other steps to shape their reputation, manage their networks, and mask information they don’t want others to know; 74% of teen social media users have deleted people from their network or friends list. Teen social media users do not express a high level of concern about third-party access to their data; just 9% say they are “very” concerned. On Facebook, increasing network size goes hand in hand with network variety, information sharing, and personal information management. In broad measures of online experience, teens are considerably more likely to report positive experiences than negative ones. Teens are increasingly sharing personal information on social media sites, a trend that is likely driven by the evolution of the platforms teens use as well as changing norms around sharing. Older teens are more likely than younger teens to share certain types of information, but boys and girls tend to post the same kind of content.
Generally speaking, older teen social media users (ages 14-17), are more likely to share certain types of information on the profile they use most often when compared with younger teens (ages 12-13). While boys and girls generally share personal information on social media profiles at the same rates, cell phone numbers are a key exception.  Boys are significantly more likely to share their numbers than girls (26% vs. 16% of teen social media users have set up their profile to automatically include their location in posts. Beyond basic profile information, some teens choose to enable the automatic inclusion of location information when they post. African-American teens are substantially more likely to report using Twitter when compared with white youth. Continuing a pattern established early in the life of Twitter, African-American teens who are internet users are more likely to use the site when compared with their white counterparts. While those with Facebook profiles most often choose private settings, Twitter users, by contrast, are much more likely to have a public account. 64% of teens with Twitter accounts say that their tweets are public, while 24% say their tweets are private. 12% of teens with Twitter accounts say that they “don’t know” if their tweets are public or private. While boys and girls are equally likely to say their accounts are public, boys are significantly more likely than girls to say that they don’t know (21% of boys who have Twitter accounts report this, compared with 5% of girls). Overall, teens have far fewer followers on Twitter when compared with Facebook friends; the typical (median) teen Facebook user has 300 friends, while the typical (median) teen Twitter user has 79 followers. Teens, like other Facebook users, have different kinds of people in their online social networks. Older teens tend to be Facebook friends with a larger variety of people, while younger teens are less likely to friend certain groups, including those they have never met in person. Older teens are more likely than younger ones to have created broader friend networks on Facebook. African-American youth are nearly twice as likely as whites to be Facebook friends with celebrities, athletes, or musicians (48% vs. Those teens who used sites like Twitter and Instagram reported feeling like they could better express themselves on these platforms, where they felt freed from the social expectations and constraints of Facebook.
Teens have a variety of ways to make available or limit access to their personal information on social media sites.
Some 60% of teens ages 12-17 who use Facebook say they have their profile set to private, so that only their friends can see it.
Girls who use Facebook are substantially more likely than boys to have a private (friends only) profile (70% vs. By contrast, boys are more likely than girls to have a fully public profile that everyone can see (20% vs. 41% of Facebook users ages 12-13 say it is “not difficult at all” to manage their privacy controls, compared with 61% of users ages 14-17. Boys and girls report similar levels of confidence in managing the privacy controls on their Facebook profile. For most teen Facebook users, all friends and parents see the same information and updates on their profile. Beyond general privacy settings, teen Facebook users have the option to place further limits on who can see the information and updates they post. Teens are cognizant of their online reputations, and take steps to curate the content and appearance of their social media presence.


Pruning and revising profile content is an important part of teens’ online identity management. 74% of teen social media users have deleted people from their network or friends’ list; 58% have blocked people on social media sites. Given the size and composition of teens’ networks, friend curation is also an integral part of privacy and reputation management for social media-using teens. Unfriending and blocking are equally common among teens of all ages and across all socioeconomic groups. 58% of teen social media users say they share inside jokes or cloak their messages in some way. Older teens are considerably more likely than younger teens to say that they share inside jokes and coded messages that only some of their friends understand (62% vs.
26% say that they post false information like a fake name, age, or location to help protect their privacy. One in four (26%) teen social media users say that they post fake information like a fake name, age or location to help protect their privacy. African-American teens who use social media are more likely than white teens to say that they post fake information to their profiles (39% vs. Overall, 40% of teen social media users say they are “very” or “somewhat” concerned that some of the information they share on social networking sites might be accessed by third parties like advertisers or businesses without their knowledge.
Younger teen social media users (12-13) are considerably more likely than older teens (14-17) to say that they are “very concerned” about third party access to the information they share (17% vs. Insights from our focus groups suggest that some teens may not have a good sense of whether the information they share on a social media site is being used by third parties. Parents, by contrast, express high levels of concern about how much information advertisers can learn about their children’s behavior online. Teens who are concerned about third party access to their personal information are also more likely to engage in online reputation management. Teens with larger Facebook networks are more frequent users of social networking sites and tend to have a greater variety of people in their friend networks.
Teens with large Facebook friend networks are more frequent social media users and participate on a wider diversity of platforms in addition to Facebook. 65% of teens with more than 600 friends on Facebook say that they visit social networking sites several times a day, compared with 27% of teens with 150 or fewer Facebook friends. Teens with more than 600 Facebook friends are more than three times as likely to also have a Twitter account when compared with those who have 150 or fewer Facebook friends (46% vs. Almost all Facebook users (regardless of network size) are friends with their schoolmates and extended family members. Teen Facebook users with more than 600 friends in their network are much more likely than those with smaller networks to be Facebook friends with peers who don’t attend their own school, with people they have never met in person (not including celebrities and other “public figures”), as well as with teachers or coaches.
On the other hand, teens with the largest friend networks are actually less likely to be friends with their parents on Facebook when compared with those with the smallest networks (79% vs. Teens with large networks share a wider range of content, but are also more active in profile pruning and reputation management activities.
Teens with the largest networks (more than 600 friends) are more likely to include a photo of themselves, their school name, their relationship status, and their cell phone number on their profile when compared with teens who have a relatively small number of friends in their network (under 150 friends).
Teens with larger friend networks are more likely than those with smaller networks to block other users, to delete people from their friend network entirely, to untag photos of themselves, or to delete comments others have made on their profile. They are also substantially more likely to automatically include their location in updates and share inside jokes or coded messages with others. In the current survey, we wanted to understand the broader context of teens’ online lives beyond Facebook and Twitter. 52% of online teens say they have had an experience online that made them feel good about themselves. One in three online teens (33%) say they have had an experience online that made them feel closer to another person. One in six online teens say they have been contacted online by someone they did not know in a way that made them feel scared or uncomfortable. Unwanted contact from strangers is relatively uncommon, but 17% of online teens report some kind of contact that made them feel scared or uncomfortable.7 Online girls are more than twice as likely as boys to report contact from someone they did not know that made them feel scared or uncomfortable (24% vs. Few internet-using teens have posted something online that caused problems for them or a family member, or got them in trouble at school. A small percentage of teens have engaged in online activities that had negative repercussions for them or their family; 4% of online teens say they have shared sensitive information online that later caused a problem for themselves or other members of their family. More than half of internet-using teens have decided not to post content online over reputation concerns. More than half of online teens (57%) say they have decided not to post something online because they were concerned it would reflect badly on them in the future.
Large numbers of youth have lied about their age in order to gain access to websites and online accounts.
In 2011, we reported that close to half of online teens (44%) admitted to lying about their age at one time or another so they could access a website or sign up for an online account.
Close to one in three online teens say they have received online advertising that was clearly inappropriate for their age. Exposure to inappropriate advertising online is one of the many risks that parents, youth advocates, and policy makers are concerned about. These findings are based on a nationally representative phone survey run by the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project of 802 parents and their 802 teens ages 12-17.
This report marries that data with insights and quotes from in-person focus groups conducted by the Youth and Media team at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University beginning in February 2013.
In addition, two online focus groups of teenagers ages 12-17 were conducted by the Pew Internet Project from June 20-27, 2012 to help inform the survey design. We use “social media site” as the umbrella term that refers to social networking sites (like Facebook, LinkedIn, and Google Plus) as well as to information- and media-sharing sites that users may not think of in terms of networking such as Twitter, Instagram, and Tumblr. About Pew Research Center Pew Research Center is a nonpartisan fact tank that informs the public about the issues, attitudes and trends shaping America and the world. If you are interested in any of these, send me an email with your name and the titles you are interested in, and I will bring them to class next Friday (May 27th). Read my comments, re-write your draft (this will be your final version) and email it to me.
Print out your final version and bring to the next class, May 27th (in 2 weeks’ time). Briefly, the value of studying academic writing is that you learn not to be tricked by other people’s propaganda, of which the world is full.
Read (at least, start reading) something easy and interesting in English, write the details and bring them class next week to tell your classmates.
Being against something does not necessarily mean that a government ban is the best, or the only, solution.
For the five different types of personal information that we measured in both 2006 and 2012, each is significantly more likely to be shared by teen social media users in our most recent survey. For instance, 52% of online teens say they have had an experience online that made them feel good about themselves. A typical teen’s MySpace profile from 2006 was quite different in form and function from the 2006 version of Facebook as well as the Facebook profiles that have become a hallmark of teenage life today. Some 16% of teen social media users said they set up their profile or account so that it automatically includes their location in posts.


Two in five (39%) African-American teens use Twitter, while 23% of white teens use the service. Girls and older teens tend to have substantially larger Facebook friend networks compared with boys and younger teens. 23%) to be Facebook friends with coaches or teachers, the only category of Facebook friends where boys and girls differ. They dislike the increasing number of adults on the site, get annoyed when their Facebook friends share inane details, and are drained by the “drama” that they described as happening frequently on the site. Some teens may migrate their activity and attention to other sites to escape the drama and pressures they find on Facebook, although most still remain active on Facebook as well. Another 25% have a partially private profile, set so that friends of their friends can see what they post. However, few choose to customize in that way: Among teens who have a Facebook account, only 18% say that they limit what certain friends can see on their profile.
For many teens who were interviewed in focus groups for this report, Facebook was seen as an extension of offline interactions and the social negotiation and maneuvering inherent to teenage life.
The practice of friending, unfriending, and blocking serve as privacy management techniques for controlling who sees what and when.
They also share a wider range of information on their profile when compared with those who have a smaller number of friends on the site. However, teens with large friend networks are also more active reputation managers on social media.
A majority of teens report positive experiences online, such as making friends and feeling closer to another person, but some do encounter unwanted content and contact from others. Among teen social media users, 57% said they had an experience online that made them feel good, compared with 30% of teen internet users who do not use social media. Looking at teen social media users, 37% report having an experience somewhere online that made them feel closer to another person, compared with just 16% of online teens who do not use social media. Teen social media users are more likely than other online teens who do not use social media to say they have refrained from sharing content due to reputation concerns (61% vs.
In the latest survey, 39% of online teens admitted to falsifying their age in order gain access to a website or account, a finding that is not significantly different from the previous survey. Yet, little has been known until now about how often teens encounter online ads that they feel are intended for more (or less) mature audiences.
The focus groups focused on privacy and digital media, with special emphasis on social media sites.
The first focus group was with 11 middle schoolers ages 12-14, and the second group was with nine high schoolers ages 14-17.
Pew’s online focus group quotes are interspersed with relevant statistics from the survey in order to illustrate findings that were echoed in the focus groups or to provide additional context to the data. It conducts public opinion polling, demographic research, media content analysis and other empirical social science research. Please read my comments, read the AW1_Essay1_Common Errors file,  then re-write your essay for the final version, print it out and bring it to class next week.
The beauty ideal we impose on women, to be thin, blond, long legged, big busted and even, foot binded. Notice that Barbie always walks on her tippy-toes.
Her glamorous beach houses, convertibles and clothing subliminally teach little girls from a very young age that consumerism is what we should aspire to.
Instead, they take an array of steps to restrict and prune their profiles, and their patterns of reputation management on social media vary greatly according to their gender and network size. For the five different types of personal information that we measured in both 2006 and 2012, each is significantly more likely to be shared by teen social media users on the profile they use most often. Boys and girls and teens of all ages and socioeconomic backgrounds are equally likely to say that they have set up their profile to include their location when they post. While overall use of social networking sites among teens has hovered around 80%, Twitter grew in popularity; 24% of online teens use Twitter, up from 16% in 2011 and 8% the first time we asked this question in late 2009. The stress of needing to manage their reputation on Facebook also contributes to the lack of enthusiasm.
Among teen Facebook users, most choose private settings that allow only approved friends to view the content that they post. Yet even as they share more information with a wider range of people, they are also more actively engaged in maintaining their online profile or persona.
In the latest survey, 30% of online teens say they have received online advertising that is “clearly inappropriate” for their age.
The team conducted 24 focus group interviews with 156 students across the greater Boston area, Los Angeles (California), Santa Barbara (California), and Greensboro (North Carolina). In addition, at several points, there are extensive excerpts boxed off as standalone text boxes that elaborate on a number of important themes that emerged from the in-person focus groups conducted by the Berkman Center. When we use “social networking sites” or “social networking sites and Twitter,” it will be to maintain the original wording when reporting survey results.
Then it progresses upwards towards more and more complex and sophisticated thinking processes. But here we are decades after she was first conceived, our kids still playing with her, while millions of girls battle anorexia, slut shaming and wondering if being conventionally beautiful is a better path to success than having a career. Various differences between white and African-American social media-using teens are also significant, with the most notable being the lower likelihood that African-American teens will disclose their real names on a social media profile (95% of white social media-using teens do this vs.
Focus group data suggests that many teens find sharing their location unnecessary and unsafe, while others appreciate the opportunity to signal their location to friends and parents. Nevertheless, the site is still where a large amount of socializing takes place, and teens feel they need to stay on Facebook in order to not miss out. Each focus group lasted 90 minutes, including a 15-minute questionnaire completed prior to starting the interview, consisting of 20 multiple-choice questions and 1 open-ended response. The groups were conducted as an asynchronous threaded discussion over three days using an online platform and the participants were asked to log in twice per day. A fortunate event, indeed, worthy of celebration, and of congratulating one’s fellow beings, those who are still around to witness it.
The circumference of her head would be 20 inches, while her waist would only be 16 inches. She would only have room for half a liver and a few inches of intestine. An ideal is merely an abstraction whereas real bodies are concrete, genetic expressions influenced by a number of factors.
Although the research sample was not designed to constitute representative cross-sections of particular population(s), the sample includes participants from diverse ethnic, racial, and economic backgrounds.
Fake accounts with fake names can still be created on Facebook, but the practice is explicitly forbidden in Facebook’s Terms of Service. Her legs would be dangerously thin and 50% longer than her arms, while the average American woman’s legs are only 20% longer. Her waist would be 56% the circumference of her hips, while the average American woman’s is 80%. At the time, almost all of these teen social media users (93%) said they had a Facebook account, but some respondents could have been reporting settings for other platforms. The belief that little kids shouldn’t be playing with anatomically correct toys, is merely asserting that kids should be ashamed of their bodies.



How to make girl stuff out of paper
How to make a mobile version of your website wordpress
How to kiss reddit
Dating site reviews married