Crate training my puppy at night youtube,tips for parents of late talkers history,potty training issues 4 year old 74,toilet training toddler regression speech - .

14.06.2015
Over the past seven years we’ve learned quite a bit about crate training puppies from crate training our first puppy, Linus who we rescued from the animal shelter, to working on crate training litters of puppies as foster parents, and finally crate training our very own guide dog puppies as guide dog puppy raisers. If you get to meet your pups litter mates then bring a plush toy or blanket to rub all over his litter mates. If your pup wakes up crying in the middle of the night take him straight to his potty spot to relieve himself. If you have a wire crate try putting a sheet over it to make him feel more cozy and enclosed.
Put your crate near the bed where your puppy can see you and if he starts crying hang your arm down so he can smell your scent. Try leaving the door open but lying down across the doorway of the crate as if to nap with him, to make him feel more comfortable in the crate, and at the same time make my body block the doorway. The one that worked for me and Stetson – I was a wreck and I thought Stetson would never get used to his crate. In Episode 1 of Puppy In Training TV we talked about some of the first things we do when bringing home a puppy.
Hi, we have an 11 week year old lab, we got her at 8 weeks old and began crate training her first night home. Hello Colby, Six days ago I picked up a seven week old husky-terrier mix named hiccup and I’ve had some issues with her not sleeping at night in her kennel.
For people who work all day I recommend getting a family member, friend, neighbor, or pet sitter to help out with the training during the day.
My husband had initially taken his blanket out of the crate because he thought he didn’t like it, however, I put the blanket back into his crate and will start to feed him in it as well with the hope that this will help solve the problem. Can you tell me more about what you mean when you say not to crate your puppy for more than 2 hours? We have a 14 week old shepherd mix that will cry for an hour or more each night in her crate. Hi Colby i’m Sue and I just got a Jack Russel mix with boxer and she is 13 weeks she hates her crate and she goes potty in it and everything. Hey I just got a 8 weeks golden doodle puppy last week , unfortunately my dad and I work all day, so I keep him in his crate for about 4-6 hours during the day. When it comes to night time, he only really whined the first few days but only for a few minutes, and i ignored it, and praised him once he was quiet.
Most puppies we’ve raised take at least a week and up to a month to adjust to the crate. If he’s escaping his crate maybe you could try getting him a new crate that he cannot escape or make some changes to the old crate so he cannot escape. My lab puppy is 10 weeks old and she is peeing in her crate fairly often – sometimes 20 minutes after I bring her in from playing outside. Crate training a new puppy to sleep through the night in his crate in 7-10 days isn't really that hard. As you are crate training a new puppy for nighttime, don't hesitate, get up and take your puppy outside to go potty. Oh 'come on now don't get discouraged if it takes a bit longer when crate training a new puppy.
From the very moment your puppy comes home he should be put on a regular potty schedule and where that place is, the yard. Alright, so in this case what I do is slap the top of the crate not too hard and tell him "knock it off!".
I’ve also heard of a toy that has a thing on the inside that you can warm on the inside and insert in the toy. The only way I was able to get him to sleep was to talk to him for 5-10 minutes, telling him what a “good boy” he was when he wasn’t crying (if he did cry I would just keep silent tell he stopped). Make sure and clean any area where your puppy has had an accident with an enzymatic cleaner like Nature’s Miracle.
I feed her all of her meals in there, and even reward her with treats when she’s being good in it during the day.
She goes potty outside with my german shepherd, also a little less than a year old but sometimes she sneaks off and does it in the house. He wasn’t crate trained to sleep in his kennel but throughout the day we would leave him in there for short periods of time.
The first night he cried for about 30 minutes and went to sleep fine, after the first night he has been sleeping through the night.


My husband and I got another Frenchie, she is 18 weeks (we got her at 16 weeks) she was at a breeder in a kennel that she would pee and poop in and it would fall to the bottom. The first thing I did was make him feel comfortable getting into the crate and that has continued, he goes in there without any directions. He is not potty trained yet so i can’t leave him freely roaming, how could i reinforce that he is not being punished, but that i have to leave to work ?
The only problem i am having now is that when is time for me to sleep i try putting him inside the crate and he won’t go or stay, i have to give him treats and block his way out in order to close the door, i really like for him to start doing it freely at night, help ? If she falls asleep on the floor in my room I will put her in the kennel and she’s good, for about thirty minutes. He has been potty trained with an occasional accident but he does sleep through the night without potty breaks. Of course he yowled and cried the first time in the crate but we kept on with the training.
I would like to take him to training classes but I think he needs to respond to his name first. The first night we bought him home he stayed in his crate but woke up a 2am, and of course I took him out so that he could do his business, and yes I praised him and continue to praise him every time he goes outside, that has ceased as he will hold his urine throughout the night.
Sometimes she just has to potty but at around two in the morning she wails and cries so loudly she wakes up the whole house and sounds something fierce, somewhere between a monkey and a pig.
Sometimes she goes to the door, sometimes I see her sneaking off into a room and i can catch her before her accident. But you can do it!BUT the good news it, the nighttime approach to crate training your puppy is basically the same as the daytime with a few differences.
I don’t know what to do and I think everyone in the house would love to get more than three hours of sleep. He never potties in it, goes in on his own for naps during the day, and at bedtime (10 pm) he goes into the crate no problem. I wake up in the middle of the night to let her out and she is still having accidents and doesn’t mind laying in it and eating her poop. Depending on your puppy’s personality and how things go, this whole process could take a week or a month. And if at all possible, before your puppy is going to spend the night in his new sleeping quarters, it would be ideal to have introduced it earlier during the day. I am home all day with both of the dogs and I am at my breaking point and thinking of maybe finding a new home for her. That way your puppy has had ample time to investigate his new sleeping quarters and realize that it is a safe "den-like" place to stay. HOWEVER, between 4:30 and 5 am he is screeching, howling and whining and chewing the crate bars. He behaves fine when I am with him, which is most of the time…but I cant even run to the store without coming home to very, very destructive, if not dangerous behavior. Unless you have that really easy pooch, then your totally lucky!Your stinking tired the next day (s) and wonder why he's so bouncy! They had the occasional hiccup, but were very receptive to the crate after decent training.However, growing up I had a Lurcher-cross-Terrier that we adopted and she took a lot of work before she was happy being crated for anything more than 15 minutes. He doesn’t bark or whine to go out side, we just have to watch for when he is sniffing around. This way he will have plenty of time to do his business outside in the yard before going into his crate for the night. You want to make it inviting and comfortable to lay in.If you happen to be crating more than one dog, follow a one dog per crate rule. A crate belongs to a single dog and is their own special place and not for sharing, particularly because dogs confined together are more likely to fight and there will be no escape.Finally, for safety reasons, before you ever allow your puppy into the crate, make sure they have nothing on. Do not make a fuss of the crate.Let your puppy investigate it all by themselves as they go around eating the treats.
When they do, pop a few more just inside for them to eat.After a few minutes, move away with your puppy and do something else.
When they’re not looking, add a few more treats close to and just inside the crate, then go back to it and let your puppy investigate.
This will help prevent them bolting out when the door opens later in life.Step 8Have your puppy lie down in the crate.
Throwing a treat right into the back so they have to go all the way in to get it is just doomed to failure, just too big an ask.


Remember, we’re trying to take as many small steps as possible to promote the greatest chance of success! Click and praise every time, but do not reward every time.If you were to reward 100% of the time your puppy will learn to expect it and be disappointed and then rebel if they do not get rewarded. They will perform only for the treat and only when they want the treat, not at any other time. Ask for 10 seconds, then 20, then 40, then go back to an easy 5 before asking for 15 again. Then increase by 30 seconds at a time until you can get to half an hour and beyond.Again though, be sure to mix up the durations you ask your puppy to spend in the crate. Lots of short little times with longer ones mixed in.Perhaps over the course of a day, ask for 10 minutes for breakfast, then 3 minutes close to lunch, then 20 minutes for dinner, 2 lots of 3 minutes between dinner and bedtime, then all overnight. At the vets or when boarding, there will be many distractions outside of the crate and you should prepare them for this.Step 19Now puppy can remain calmly in the crate with the door closed, you need to start adding distractions. Play catch with a friend.Start with small distractions and build up to more noise and more motion slowly.Step 20The final step! Then train in your car if it fits or you have a car crate.Finally, although not easy, try to do some crate training in friends houses and gardens. And for house training reasons you do not want them pottying in their crate or inside your home. After this just once after 4 hours and then you can begin to stretch the time out until they last the night fully at 12 weeks+.When going for a potty break, you must be absolutely silent. So how do you make sure you aren’t ignoring a basic need and are only ignoring cries for attention?First of all you want to make sure they are empty before bed. This means do not feed them in the 3 hours before and do not allow them to load up on water in the 2 hours before bed time. Some people don’t mind carrying the one crate from room to room, others buy two having one in each of the living area and the bedroom. Keep them out with you, on blankets or towels if supervised, or kept safe in an open top cardboard box if not.
This will help to avoid any feelings of being alone, of being abandoned and associating these feelings with the crate.Crate them little and often while you are in the same room.
This will teach them that being quiet is the only way to get you to come to them.As you approach, if they start to scream again, simply ignore them. Stay in the room but busy yourself doing something else and do not turn your attention to them until they’re quiet again.
All logic says it will go much smoother as it’s so unforced and running at your dogs own pace, therefore it will be far less stressful and almost certainly have a higher chance of success than rushing it. All it requires is to follow the rules and steps laid out above and the patience and dedication to see it through calmly and methodically.Some people may encounter problems. I read the articles in the rest of the series and have been waiting for instructions to start crate training my Lab puppy. We will not crate her often, but just to help break the chewing habit as it’s getting expensive. I wanted to crate train her, but it may be too late now because we have been putting her in there to sleep at night. She doesn’t hate it in there, but definitely howls and cries for a good amount of time before stopping. Most other websites have always said to put her in the crate and, as hard as it is, ignore her whining until it stops on her own (given that she doesn’t need to be taken out).Thanks in advance!
You should go to her just once during the night to SILENTLY take her to her bathroom spot (at 10 weeks it’s unlikely she can last the night). Any attention she receives will likely reinforce her behavior because you will inadvertently teach her that if she makes a noise for long enough, eventually you will come. And when you go to her in the morning to let her out, you should go to the crate and patiently wait there for silence before you give any attention or let her out.



Help your child deal with anger yoga
How to train puppies not to play rough op
Teach your child read 100 easy lessons download videos
Toddler sleep training blog

Comments to «Crate training my puppy at night youtube»

  1. VUSALE writes:
    Which I believe made the transition easier and ont., employees break up the the flushing sound could.
  2. Smach_That writes:
    Have in no way hit this particular issue practically no little intestine), and.
  3. Sensizim_Kadersiz writes:
    Little, all I had to use had paper and, if the youngster is a boy.
  4. KahveGozlumDostum writes:
    Ps- in my book, I share a ton of ideas ( a entire chapter) not a rapid method it typically takes young children to poo.
  5. XOSE111 writes:
    Was in the middle of a custody battle for.