Recent Question: I dont see the blades listed on your site, Can you tell me who sells them? Scottish Ensemble and Shetland Arts are pleased to announce that the UK’s leading string orchestra will come to Shetland this June for a residency.
In keeping with both organisations’ mission to put on events of genuine benefit for local communities, from 22 to 25 June 2016 Scottish Ensemble musicians will be resident on the island, using their time to deliver a varied programme of events based on local needs, ranging from educational workshops to participatory music-making gatherings to pop-up performances in unexpected locations. Highlights of their stay will include a community-wide dinner part and jam session, held at Carnegie Hall on the 22nd. On the 23rd the musicians will head out into the community for an ‘out and about’ day, involving performances in various community spaces, including Wastview care centre, Aith Junior High and ‘living room concerts’ in the North Isles. On the 24th musicians will take part in a series of schools workshops, and the residency will culminate on the 25th with two exciting performances.  The first, Harmony Quest, is a captivating 60 minute play aimed at 3-9 year olds which introduces them to string instruments by turning them in to a range of characters in a musical adventure. This longer SE Residency is the next event in a partnership between Scottish Ensemble and Shetland Arts, which began in the summer of 2013 with a ‘mini-residency’ centring around a new SE commission by renowned Scottish composer Sally Beamish.
Scottish Ensemble’s continued presence on the island has been made possible by the generous support of Inksters Solicitors, a legal firm run by Brian Inkster, based in Glasgow and Shetland and serving the whole of Scotland.
SE Musicians will also be present at the Lounge, Lerwick, to take part in an informal session. SE Musicians head out and about in the isles, performing at a number of locations, including Wastview Care Home, Aith Junior High, Brae High School, Northhavn Care Home, Burravoe Primary School and The Old Haa. The UK’s leading string orchestra performs a heady mix of French music from the turn of the century, featuring gems by Ravel, Debussy and Faure.
A new exhibition showcasing a unique collaboration between  Unst based sculptor Tony Humbleyard and Edinburgh based choreographer and dancer Jack Webb opens this Friday at Bonhoga Gallery.
For this exhibition Tony has been working closely with Jack Webb, as part of a development opportunity supported by Shetland Arts.
The exhibition opens to the public at 6pm on Friday 22nd April, and will feature a world premier of the dance piece created by Webb.  Using the artworks, space, and audience to create an immersive and involving piece, the combination of sculpture and dance promises to be something both exciting and new.
Accordion and Mandolin workshops will feature alongside the usual offering of Fiddle and Guitar workshops at Fiddle Frenzy 2016, Shetland Arts has announced. In the first of their 3 year tenure as curators, Eunice Henderson and Claire White are introducing three days of mandolin workshops with local tutor Jenny Henry. Another new addition will be additional sessions of the very popular Scandi Sessions, established and run by Eunice and Debbie Scott.
For more advanced students the festival is also offering a series of Master classes which will run on Sunday 7th August and will include a class by Trevor Hunter.
The popular Guitar workshops will also return as a full week option, led by tutors Brian Nicholson and Kris Drever.
Shetland Arts have announced a series of filmmaking workshops to encourage members of the public to have a go at creating a short film in time for this year’s Screenplay Festival.  Entitled ‘Just Do It’ – the workshops will explore how anyone can make a film using the technology they have on hand, and are aimed anyone who likes the idea of making a film, but is unsure of how to go about it. The workshops will take place at Mareel on 16, 23rd April & 7 May and will cover all the essential aspects of filmmaking from developing the initial idea, to editing using free software,  led by tutors Simon Thompson and Mike Guest. Simon Thompson is a professional filmmaker who has worked in the UK film & television industry for 14 years.
Simon is dedicated to the education and training of the next generation of filmmakers and has taught and presented workshops throughout Scotland on a variety of filmmaking topics. Describing himself as ‘one of the world’s most knitted freckliest men you will ever meet’ Mike Guest is an surfer, adventurer and filmmaker who has been coming to Shetland to film its beautiful scenery and lively culture for years.  Regulars at the Shetland Folk Festival will no doubt have seen him working behind the scenes, and he has also filmed documentaries for Promote Shetland. Workshop participants will have the opportunity to submit their films to this years Screenplay Festival. The final design for the waterfront sculpture, commissioned as part of the pelagic sculpture project, has been revealed. A few days before Christmas last year, artist Jo Chapman presented three potential sculpture designs for Lerwick’s waterfront to the four business partners who have commissioned the work.
The design that was selected by the Pelagic Sculpture Partnership is called ‘Da Lightsome Buoy’ and is a celebration of the role the pelagic fishing industry plays in Shetland life. Known for their eclectic approach to their music, combining English Folk with other musical genres, The Unthanks celebrated their 10th anniversary at the back end of 2015 with a short tour of small intimate spaces, with a paired back line-up; their feeling being that if folk music is a lifelong pursuit, 10 years is just a drop in the ocean.
Nominated for the Mercury Music Prize and the only British folk representation in The Guardian’s and Uncut’s best albums of last decade (worldwide, all genres), The Unthanks have an army of notable fans, including actor Martin Freeman, Elvis Costello, Colin Firth, Robert Wyatt, Ben Folds, Ryan Adams, Rosanne Cash, members of Portishead and Radiohead, Dawn French, Paul Morley, Ewan McGregor, Stephan Mangan, Al Murray, Ade Edmondson and Nick Hornby. Following public discussions at Mareel in February, Shetland Arts is inviting members of the public to take part in a survey to gather thoughts and views from interested parties on what their hopes and ambitions are for the future development of Literature in Shetland.
The survey includes only one question: What are your priorities for the development of Literature in Shetland?
Shetland Arts will be holding a meeting to discuss future priorities for supporting and encouraging development in literature in the isles.
The meeting follows on from those previously held on Theatre, Visual Art and Craft and Film. Graeme Howell, General Manager of Shetland Arts, said ‘The previous meetings regarding film, theatre and visual art and craft have been extremely productive, and have helped us understand where the Shetland public and creative communities feel we ought to be focussing our efforts. As with previous discussions, the meeting will be followed up by an online survey to gather further feedback, and ensure that all interested parties have an opportunity to have their say.
Further conversations about music and contemporary and traditional arts are planned over the next twelve months.
Teaching packages for Shetland Arts’ annual Fiddle Frenzy festival, taking place 31st July – 7th August, will go on sale on Monday 1 February. Eunice & Claire said “We are both very excited at the opportunity to curate Fiddle Frenzy over the next 3 years. The fiddle tutors confirmed for 2016 are: Andrew Gifford, Debbie Scott, Catriona Macdonald, Lois Nicol, Kaela Jamieson, Mary Rutherford, Kirsten Hendry and Maggie Adamson. Plans for other music workshops, including guitar accompaniment, are still being finalised and will be announced in the coming weeks.
Creative Fringe classes will again be on offer, curated by local artists Amy Fisher and Ana Arnett. Shetland Arts’ Lynda Anderson said: “Fiddle Frenzy, now in its 13th year, is a great opportunity for us all to celebrate our unique fiddle tradition.
As part of NT Connections (the largest youth theatre festival on the planet), Shetland Youth Theatre is preparing to unleash a new horror on an unsuspecting public. Stock up with supplies, lock the doors and tremble with fear as Hugh Mungus a 220 foot tall baby wreaks havoc on the world around him in revenge for the cruelty inflicted by the sinister Janus Technologies.
Now in its 20th year, Connections has commissioned over 150 new pieces of theatre for 13- 19 year olds, and provides young people with the opportunity to experience the process of putting on a professional show, from staging and acting, to developing costumes and marketing the event.
Director John Haswell said ‘Gargantua’ is an experience not to be missed and one that will never ever be forgotten’ – tickets for the Mareel shows are on sale now – make sure you don’t miss out! DESCRIPTION: The Cotton Tiberius is the richly illuminated 11th century manuscript in the Cotton collection of the British Library and contains one of the oldest and most excellent world maps.
In its presentation of the world as a whole, this map adopts a roughly square form measuring 21x17 cm, and in this one respect it recalls some of the less desirable aspects of examples of the Beatus Ashburnham derivative Book IIA, #207). The marvels promised by the inscription above the poem are represented on the map by the Cinocephales (dog-heads), the gens Griphorum (a conflation of griffins and people), Gog and Magog, the burning mountain and the mountain of gold, the last two located in remote corners of Asia. In geographical content, it does follow the medieval European convention of orientation with East at the top and somewhat centered on Jerusalem. Of purely inland geography, unconnected with the coast, there is not much in the European region of this map: the Huns, Dalmatia, Dardania, Histria, and Tracia, all circling around Pannonia. However, this is apparently the first map to add to the knowledge of Ptolemy with regards to northwestern Europe. Greece the name Macedonia seems to be written over Morea; Athens and Attica are widely separated. It is sometimes claimed that the association of Armenia with Mount Ararat and Noaha€™s Ark appeared on maps only after the First Crusade. In the map mountains are shown green; red is used for the Persian Gulf and the Red Sea, as well as the Nile and some other rivers. This is one of the few medieval maps that shows divisions of provinces and countries, indicated by straight lines, though the general T-O shape is still preserved by the dominant body of the Mediterranean, here filled with a multitude of islands, complemented by the Nilus in Africa and Tanais [Don] at the center left of the map, with its source in the green mountain.
In Asia there is much more inland geography, chiefly connected with the Twelve Tribes and Biblical history. A lost Roman province map may have been the source of the divisions so clearly marked in Asia Minor, in Central and Southeastern Europe, and in North Africa. There are several names and features which show striking independence of any other known map authority of the earlier Middle Ages. The comparative excellence of the Cottoniana is perhaps due to its being the production of an Irish scholar-monk living in the household of the learned and traveled Archbishop Sigeric of Canterbury (992-994), with whose Itinerary, from Rome to the English Channel, the present design has several curious resemblances. Considering the 11th century Anglo-Saxon mappamundi, the oldest such English map surviving, as a form of a virtual world more analogous to a digital environment than physical geography can reveal much about this famous mapa€™s cultural mechanics and meaning.
In past discussions, the cultures of medieval worlds such as Anglo-Saxon England have been understood to lack the veneer of ideological unity that comes with later examples of more modern and overtly ratiocinated expressions of national identity.
The Cotton Map certainly appears to fulfill Gellnera€™s formula: it contains, on the whole, a rather fractured and jumbled version of the known world, crossed by lines and marked by inscriptions drawn from a skein of classical, Christian, legendary and local traditions of cartography, and, on the face of it, refuses a€?a single continuous, logical spacea€™. However, the Cottoniana map also encodes a certain cultural unease with this represented and sacral order, a discomfort revealed by how the mapa€™s virtual nature allows what is edge and what is center to fluctuate over its surface, and how this fluctuation articulates an Anglo-Saxon challenge to its homelanda€™s traditional place in the geographical order of the world. In addition, Melaa€™s use of finibus for a€?landa€™ may also contain a further joke at the expense of Britaina€™s remoteness; finis commonly carries connotations of limits, ends or borders. Three hundred years later, the Roman historian Solinus repeats this sentiment, noting that for all practical purposes, the coastline of Gaul stood as the edge of the known world, while Britain represented a land beyond the periphery a€“ paene orbis alterius [a€?almost an other worlda€™]. As Nicholas Howe has recently argued, native writersa€™ positioning Brittania in the north-west demonstrates the historical influence of the Roman vantage point, but, in the shift from imperial Rome to medieval Rome, this distantiated perspective assumes Christian as well as geographical significance. The Cotton Map makes a sure statement of the Anglo-Saxon geo-historical paradox: a major part of Anglo-Saxon identity is particularly rooted in Christian authority, whether shaped by fears of pagan conquest or a desire to prove ethnic superiority by converting others, but this ideology historically has in turn viewed England, literally, as the edge of nowhere.
From a literary, if not literal standpoint, then, the Cottoniana map remains centered on its inheritance of Roman geography. Again, one of the most striking features of the Cottoniana map is that, unlike most other mappaemundi, its shape is rectangular rather than round. Fitting the world to the world of the page also allows the mapmaker more space in the lower left-hand corner to depict a€?the angle of Englanda€™; as Howe has demonstrated, the doubled meaning of a€?anglea€™ and a€?Anglea€™ was not unknown in contemporary descriptions of Anglo-Saxon England. Not surprisingly, the British Isles are rather well represented in the map a€“ the one cartographic detail that has occasioned critical comment in the past.
Less discussed, however, is the mapa€™s use of water to relate England to the rest of the world. Since the center of the Cottoniana mapa€™s world presents the general impression of empty space, rather than of a loci medii, the center of Europe likewise appears largely vacant, prompting Patrick McGurk to hazard that the confused jumble of regions and tribes thrown into Central Europe represents the attempt to break up a€?the largest blank area in the mapa€™. In classical and early medieval definitions of Britannia, the territory was long defined as a cosmographic and cultural a€?othera€? to continental lands. What remains most startling about the mapa€™s treatment of Europe, though, is the sole inscription allowed to border England, sudbryttas, presumably meant to represent Brittany. Rejecting classical Otherness, the map denies the geography of the pre- and early Anglo-Saxon literary history that was invested with what Homi Bhabha has termed a€?colonial mimicrya€™ a€“ the desire of the colonized to present itself as a€?a reformed, recognizable othera€™.
The Scandinavian elements of the Cottoniana map are not surprising, of course, given the sustained presence and development of Anglo-Scandinavian culture in the second half of Anglo-Saxon Englanda€™s history.
Such classical revisionism is an arguable reading, of course, but like the Cottoniana map, the interpolations in the Old English Orosius also present a cultural perspective that centers Anglo-Saxon England, and offers up other regions to be marginalized in its place. In addition, though these pagan insertions do qualify the original intent of Orosius, Stephen Harris has argued that other Old English alterations to Orosiusa€™ history do not refute Christianity, but rather present a€?a sense of Germanic community [that] shapes the Latin into an Old English story of the origins of Christendoma€™. The Old English Orosius, in effect, de-centers Rome from a distinctly Roman history of the world. In the 11th century a€?real timea€™ of the Cottoniana map, the imperial glory of Rome is no more real than that of Babylon. The Cottoniana map has not been dated more surely than the first half of the 11th century, and possibly may be even slightly later; see McGurk and Dumville, pp.
The 'Anglo-Saxon world map' contains the earliest known, relatively realistic depiction of the British Isles. Foys, M., a€?The Virtual Reality of the Anglo-Saxon Mappamundia€?, Literature Compass 1, 2003. In geographical content, it does follow the medieval European convention of orientation with East at the top and somewhat centered on Jerusalem.A  The bulbous projection of land on the coast, north of Jerusalem, is perhaps meant for Carmel. To cut entirely through 6" round stock, you'll have to make a second cut after rotating the pipe 180 degrees after making the first cut. This will be followed by a full ensemble performance of En Reve heady mix of French music from the turn of the century, featuring gems by Ravel, Debussy and Faure as well as Tchaikovsky’s sonorous Serenade for Strings.
The performance, depicting a turbulent sea voyage off Scotland’s coast, featured fiddler Chris Stout and harpist Catriona McKay. After spending the afternoon rehearsing with local musicians, Scottish Ensemble will put down their instruments and don their aprons to make a meal alongside members of the community, with local cook and food writer, Marian Armitage in charge.
Join five musical characters on a fun-filled tale of adventure, friendship and sibling rivalry in which narration is brought to life by live music from Scottish Ensemble musicians. Also including Tchaikovsky’s sonorous Serenade for Strings, this promises to be an exquisite summer’s evening of evocative music, painted by strings. He studied art Halifax College and completed a Fine Art degree at University of the Highlands and Islands.
Jack is one of Scotland’s leading choreographers and dancers and has worked with major dance companies throughout the world. The piece will also be filmed, and will be incorporated into the exhibition following the performance.
Taking place the first week in August and now in it’s 13th year, Fiddle Frenzy is Shetland Arts’ annual celebration of Shetland traditional music, offering a range of workshops, concerts and tours. Scottish Borders based accordionist Ian Lowthian, will also visit to offer three days of accordion workshops.
These will initially be available to book only by Frenzy students, with any remaining available spaces going on public sale nearer the time.


Creative Fringe workshops are also available, run by Amy Colvin and Ana Arnett which offer a selection of art workshops and tours of local artist studios. Simon also mentors Maddrim Media, Shetland’s young filmmaking group, gently steering their boundless creativity in a vaguely organised direction. Mike’s work is characterised by a sense of adventure and a love of life.  He has also filmed extensively in New Zealand, and has an extensive experience working as a technician on live performances, making him the ideal person to guide budding filmmakers through the processes of problem solving, seizing the moment and just getting the job done. Celebrating its 10th year this year, the festival is curated by Mark Kermode, Linda Ruth Williams and Kathy Hubbard and is a celebration of all things fillm, from the big screen to the small.  The Home Made screenings are always the highlight of the festival, giving Shetlands budding and experienced film makers a chance to shine. The pelagic sculpture project celebrates the Shetland’s long association with pelagic fishing. This presentation of ideas was the culmination of the artist’s ten week residency in Shetland.
The proposed artwork is based on a giant fishing buoy which will feature text and imagery captured by the artist during her conversations and meetings with members of the community. The Unthanks is a family affair for Tyneside sisters Rachel and Becky Unthank, with Rachel married to pianist, producer, arranger and composer, Adrian McNally.
They see folk music less as a style of music and more as a oral history that offers perspective on our own time.
Thirteen key points and phrases, highlighted as being important during the meetings, have been listed. Literature feeds into some many areas of the arts, so we encourage anyone with an interest, be they writers, readers, educators or anything else to take part and make their voice heard.
It will take place in Mareel on 16th February at 6pm in Screen 2, Mareel.  The event is open to all, and any interested parties are encouraged to attend on the night. This year will see the first of a 3 year term for new curators Eunice Henderson & Claire White, both highly respected teachers and performers of Shetland fiddle. It’s been a pleasure and privilege to tutor and perform at previous Frenzy years and will be great to extend that experience by designing a whole week of Shetland culture for attendees. Students travel from around the world to learn the tunes & techniques of the famed Shetland style, from our local fiddlers, and here in the islands themselves, where the landscapes and culture bear such a significance on the tradition. Following the performances in Shetland, the cast of Gargantua will be fundraising to take the show on tour to Inverness to perform to sell out audiences there as part of the Connections festival. Called the Cottoniana or Anglo-Saxon map, it dates from 995-1050, just before the Norman Conquest, and does not appear to belong to any one of the identifiable a€?familiesa€? of medieval maps, as described by M.C.
However, though of small size, it is one of the most unique of all medieval world-pictures. At the top left, behind the Lion we see the Taurus Montes, where the Tigris and Euphrates have their sources. One reads Mons Albanorum [Albanian Mountains, possibly the Caucasus] and the other is regio Colchorum, the region of Colchis, located northeast of the Black Sea.
As not merely a measurement, but as a creation of the world known to Anglo-Saxon England, this mappamundi charts a number of struggles between the two realities of Englanda€™s marginal locus in the historical record of the known physical world, and of the Anglo-Saxon impulse to re-center the world on their own island. Ernest Gellner, for instance, uses explicitly spatial figures to describe such conflicting realities; for Gellner, a€?pre-modern and pre-rationala€™ visions of the world lack a€?a single continuous logical spacea€™, and instead consist of a€?multiple, not properly united, but hierarchically related sub-worldsa€™, and a€?special privileged facts, sacralized and exempt from ordinary treatmenta€™. Anglo-Saxon writers inherited a long historical tradition of Britaina€™s peripheral status as a remote corner of the world. The people of Britain, therefore, were rich only in livestock and their own place on the margins. Such views continue through early medieval writers such as Isidore, and early native writers remained substantially invested in such views of their home.
In Gildas, one finds a striking example of spiritual calibration, as the historian initially refers to the island as divina statera [in the divine scales] and then describes the conversion of Brittania as the suna€™s warming of glaciali frigore rigenti insulae et velut longiore terrarum secessu soli visibili non proximae [an island frozen with lifeless ice and quite remote from the visible sun a€“ recessed from the world].
At least on the surface, English cosmography does not, in the words of one commentator, a€?develop strategies for recuperating auctoritasa€™ until well into the 13th century. However, it is not uncommon for critics to assume that, as a mappamundi, the map also theo-graphically depicts Jerusalem as its physical center.
Church writers long agreed that the earth was spherical, but also had a tough job reconciling the circular form of the earth and the scriptural concept of the worlda€™s four corners. Cornering the world, though, also adds space that the Anglo-Saxon artist did not know quite how to accommodate.
The coastline and shape of the islands are pretty particular for the time; they contain icons of three named cities (London, Winchester and Armagh), and a number of delineated regions, including named regions for Ireland (Hibernia) and Scotland (Camri).
In keeping with classical convention, the map circumscribes the earth with a grey wash of ocean that in effect presents a third frame inside the double-lined border and then the manuscript page. In Europe, notably, major cities appear only on its periphery: Constantinople in the east, and Rome and a number of other Italian cities in the south.
In his Etymologies, Isidore of Seville, in language closely matching Orosius, explains that Britain is an island within sight of Spain, but literally opposite Gaul: Brittania Oceani insula .
The very form of the inscription reveals much about the Anglo-Saxon attitudes behind it; sudbryttas contains a unique use of the Anglo-Saxon a€?A?a€?, one of the only distinctively Old English characters in the text of the map.
Instead, the version of the Anglo-Saxon world celebrates the origin of Anglo-Saxon culture, and in turn highlights northern, not southern continental connections. Accordingly, these elements compare to substantially older examples of Anglo-Saxon literature.
Harrisa€™ chief example of this reshaping, namely how the Old English version substantively alters the Goth sacking of Rome, holds particular interest with regard to the discussion of the Cottoniana map. In a similar manner, the Cottoniana map shifts the focus away from two traditional centers of the spiritual and geographic worlds on whose margins Anglo-Saxon England existed. As a virtual world, its temporal aspects are no more rooted in the primary world than are its spatial aspects. It was created, probably at Canterbury, between 1025 and 1050 but is probably ultimately based on a model dating from Roman times. Nevertheless the British Isles (bottom left) are immediately recognizable and the Orkneys, the Scillies, the Channel Islands and the isles of Man and of Wight are shown. Edson, a€?The oldest world maps: classical sources of three VIIIth century mappaemundia€?, The Ancient World, 24, 1993, pp. The audience are then invited to join the musicians, to share them for an evening of music and food.
This relationship continued in 2015-16, when SE performed three chamber music concerts at Mareel. Marian’s 2015 book ‘Shetland Food and Cooking’ has been shortlisted for a Gourmand World Cookbook Award). This captivating 60-minute play is aimed at primary school children, introducing them to string instruments in a fun way by turning them into a range of characters on a musical adventure. He is associate artist at Tramway, Glasgow during 2016 and has recently returned from Iceland taking part in the NordDance International Exchange. These classes will be open to bairns only, up to P7 and available to book individually, outwith Frenzy packages. It was commissioned by LHD, Lerwick Port Authority, Shetland Catch and the Shetland Fish Producers Association and is managed by Shetland Arts. The design ideas were influenced by a series of workshops, meetings, events, and the sharing of stories, photos and memories by the many people Jo met during her stay here.
The pelagic sculpture project is supported by sponsorship from the four businesses in association with Shetland Arts, with match funding from Arts & Business Scotland through their New Arts Sponsorship Grants Scheme.
Using the traditional music of the North East of England as a starting point, the influence of Steve Reich, Miles Davis, Sufjan Stevens, Robert Wyatt, Antony & The Johnsons, King Crimson and Tom Waits can be heard in the band’s 8 albums to date, including Mount The Air, released to huge critical acclaim last year. Their approach to storytelling straddles the complex relationship between modernism and learning from the past.
Users are asked to select the five statements which they feel best describe their priorities for the development of Literature in Shetland.
It is an opportunity too for local players to immerse themselves in an intense week of learning, with some tutors who may be new to them. 995, some 100 years before the First Crusade, Mont Ararat and Noaha€™s Ark are shown, firmly placed in the territory of Armenia. Below the range is the legend Montes Armenia, which describes the twin Peaks of Mount Ararat; here shown sideways, with the three-storey Arca Noe [Noaha€™s Ark] perched on top. Hiberia [Iberia] is shown south of Montes Armenie, between the two rivers rising form the Armenian plateau and Taurus, in the territory of Mesopotamia. Flowing eastward from Upper Egypt, it turns west and somehow disappears underground to emerge further down and continue its flow towards Alexandria and the Mediterranean Sea. The Cottonian map places Gog and Magog hard by the northern ocean, west of the Caspian Sea and the Ten Lost Tribes appear in the Middle East. Rome and Jerusalem appear prominently a€“ with its six towers Rome is one of the two largest cities shown (along with the historically massive Babylon), biblical lands occupy the center band of the map, marked by straight, confident lines, holy waterways are distinctively colored in bright red, and a paradisiacally described island occupies the top centre of the map. In the first century, the Roman geographer Pomponius Mela described the inhabitants of the island as inculti omnes and ita magnis aliarum opum ignari [a€?all uncivilizeda€™ and a€?moreover ignorant of a great many other thingsa€™]. If, as Orosius describes in Historiae adversum Paganos, world history did move from East to West, then readers of his Anglo-Saxon translation could easily have found themselves on the very edge of one of feower endum pyses midangeardes a€“ at the edge of the physical world and at the end of the processes of history and salvation.
In its depiction of England, however, the Cottoniana map anticipates later strategies for transforming the cosmographical auctoritas of the Anglo-Saxon homeland, and pushed back against the traditions that have relegated it to the edge. Harley has observed the widespread practice that a€?societies place their own territories at the center of their cosmographies or world mapsa€™, but a quick glance at the Cotton map confirms that it does not, on the page, center Anglo-Saxon England.
Jerusalem has a long scriptural and exegetic tradition (including Anglo-Saxon writers such as Bede) as the exact center of the earth, and appears as the precise center of a number of famous mappaemundi, most notably the Hereford (#226), Ebstorf (#224), Psalter (#223) and Higden (#232) maps. In mappaemundi, the usual solution consisted of placing a spherical map inside a square, and filling these a€?cornersa€™ with iconographically suitable adornment. Consequently, Eastern Europe and Asia Minor expand considerably, creating vast empty spaces that in turn push Constantinople further north than it is normally found on medieval maps and, likewise, Jerusalem further south.
Unlike any other mappaemundi, though, water similarly frames the British Isles, in effect creating the same representation of the world in microcosm.
In sharp contrast, the broad strip of Western Europe that borders England is remarkably devoid of any inscription or detail.
The literal meaning of the inscription, a€?south Britaina€™, assumes a somewhat colonialist attitude towards Brittany, and onomastically centers the perspective of the region squarely on England.
In contrast to its treatment of Western Europe, the Cottoniana map lavishes attention on the Scandinavian north, and provides seven names for the area (mostly absent from Orosius), including names for tribes in Norway, Finland, and possibly Iceland.
The cumulative effect of all these Scandinavian a€“ or reputedly Scandinavian a€“ references recall the famous interpolation of the voyages of Ohthere and Wulfstan in the Alfredian Old English translation of Orosius.
The Old English rewriting of the sack of Rome carefully excises from the original text any emphasis on the political power and spiritual centrality of Rome. We have seen how the physical world of the map literally de-centers Jerusalem a€“ a position it will not manifest for centuries in English mappaemundi a€“ while likewise marginalizing the effect of Rome upon England. I have been given a number of nice comments from people in Shetland regarding our support of the recent run of three smaller concerts. His prints and sculptures are inspired by animal bones and found objects, using them to explore how we interpret the world around us. He also spent time away from the dark edit suites developing his skills in cinematography, location sound recording and in front of the camera. From these meetings, a group of Community Advisers was formed who had input into the choice of the final design.
It is hoped that the artwork will be installed by late summer 2016, subject to the relevant permissions being in place. The girls' great-grandmother Lorrie Getman of South Haven took them to the beach to enjoy one of the few days of sunshine during the week of spring break. Below the Ark the legend Armenia can be seen, although somewhat masked by the print bleeding through. In addition, there are a number of unlabelled provinces, rivers and islands, leading one to surmise that this map was copied from a larger and more detailed map. England, in the meantime, occupies the lower left corner of the map, its cities tiny and its terrain free of the distinctive straight lines that dominate the center strip of the Holy Land. Mela correlates the ignorance of Britain to the islanda€™s extreme distance from Rome and the Continent, and rounds out his description by noting that the British pecore ac finibus dites [a€?are rich only in cattle and landa€™]. The Orosian a€?four ends of this eartha€™ also recall the common scriptural phrase a€?the four corners of the eartha€™, a phrase translated directly (feowerum foldan sceatum) or alluded to many times in Old English literature.
The edge of geographic knowledge, Mary Campbell reminds us, can be a location charged with a€?moral significancea€™ and even a€?divine dangerousnessa€™. Importantly, though, the Cotton map should be considered as centered on Jerusalem in only the loosest sense of the term, since the map locates the city slightly down (west) and far to the right of center. The Cottoniana map, in contrast, has the look of a round map that has been deliberately stretched to fit the dimensions of the manuscript page. In comparison to later mappaemundi, such a choice actually de-emphasizes the center as it creates room in the corners.
One city in the southwest lacks an inscription, perhaps an indication of the provenance of the map or mapmaker. In the formal elements of the map, the curve of the Channel and North Sea echo the form of Mediterranean and Black Seas, which clearly demarcate Europe from the rest of the world.
Unlike the mappaemundi closest in time to it, the Cottoniana map completely ignores lower Germany and France, and from what appears to be Jutland to the Pyrenees mountains, the map includes exactly one inscription: sudbryttas (discussed below). Such an attitude also references one of the first major cultural events of post-Roman Britain, namely the victory of Anglo-Saxon invaders over native Britain, and the subsequent late 5th century settlement of Bretons in southern Gaul. The one inscription from Orosius retained in this area, Daria (Dacia) ubi et Gothia, only intensifies the Cottoniana mapa€™s regard for the Nordic. Traditionally, the interpolation of allegedly firsthand accounts of explorations of Scandinavia and the Baltic region into Orosiusa€™ classical geography is viewed as a natural extension of ninth century Englanda€™s connection and interest in things Scandinavian.
Instead, the Anglo-Saxon version uses the occasion of the sacking of Rome to manifest a distinctly Germanic notion of Christendom and kingship, one which a€?permits vernacular access to and Anglo-Saxon identification with an order of identity that has left the senate and people of Rome far behinda€™. For Anglo-Saxon England, Rome meant many things, and the map should be understood as embodying all of them: the past imperial power, responsible for the historical view of England, as well as a present fallen one, and the present spiritual center of Christian belief.


However, the editors also consider, tentatively, the possibility that some of the script of the map is of a slightly later date, and possibly as late as the early 12th century.
London, the Saxon capital of Winchester and Dublin are indicated using Roman-style town symbols. Yet the map, itself a product of late Anglo-Saxon culture, appears to practically embrace the traditional marginalization of England.
Abandoning guidebooks, maps and signs in favour of random journeys and direct experiences, he has been collecting materials from around the island, which he has incorporated into the work. This part of the project is documented in the Pelagic Sculpture Project’s current ‘Fish Van Collection’ exhibition at Bonhoga Gallery which can be viewed until mid?April.
Living on the edge, as it were, Anglo-Saxons felt the danger of their borders keenly throughout their history. Recent commentators have noted that most early medieval world maps actually do not center Jerusalem, and that this convention probably derives from the later political context of the Crusadesa€™ quests for the Holy City. The map, while retaining some suggestive quality of roundness, definitely has corners, in marked contrast to the traditional circular format of such maps, including later and more elaborate English mappaemundi, where the British Isles end up compressed, squashed, really, into the curvature of the border.
In the Cottoniana map, the physical center of the world appears rather sparse, consisting of mostly empty sections of lower Syria and the eastern Mediterranean. Looking at the map in this fashion, one can then see a succession of three nested identical L-shaped frames, which draw the eye of the viewer from the whole world, to Europe, and then finally, to England. Thus with reference to the area of classical Gaul, or contemporary France, Normandy, Flanders, Maine and Burgundy, the map chooses to depict a period both after the fall of Rome, and before the rise of Western European political states that would by the middle of the 11th century definitively end Anglo-Saxon power.
McGurk notes that the map pulls Dacia considerably out of position; Orosius places Dacia et Gothia in the middle of Eastern Europe, between the territories of Alania and Germania, while the Cottoniana map moves Dacia et Gothia much further north.
Sealy Gilles, for instance, claims that in the Alfredian additions, the Anglo-Saxon Wulfstana€™s account of pagan customs persisting on the margins of European Christendom is reminiscent of the ancient customs of the English themselves.
Italy alone contains seven cities, including Rome a€“ more than any other region on the map a€“ and the end result is a mass of iconographic power pointing at this imperial and spiritual seat.
Similarly, the map produces many Englands: the past, Othered colony of Roman conquest and then missionaries, the present geographic island, and, most importantly, the desired stable political entity in the process of moving in from the edge of the world and assuming a centric role in, at the very least, a larger corner of Europe.
Conversely, McGurk and Dumville also consider that this script may also be the work of the manuscripta€™s main scribe (p.
New information was added but at each stage errors and misunderstandings occurred in the copying process. The size of the Cornish peninsula is exaggerated, probably reflecting the importance of its copper and tin mines in the ancient world. While Anglo-Saxon England possessed a coherent national identity since at least the ninth century, this 11th century depiction refers to the island by its Roman name, Brittania, rather than the more contemporary Angelcynn. Recent commentators have noted that most early medieval world maps actually do not center Jerusalem, and that this convention probably derives from the later political context of the Crusadesa€™ quests for the Holy City.A  It is tempting, however, to also consider the de-centering of Jerusalem in the Cottoniana map as a function of the mapa€™s own textual convention, and the way it responds to and ultimately rejects notions of Englanda€™s marginalized state. The day-long festival included activities for children and discounts at downtown shops and restaurants.
Further down we see a second range of mountains also named Taurus, the continuation of the remaining section of the same range, continued with a break. The time of the Cottoniana map was no different, as the Anglo-Saxon state began the 11th century unsuccessfully fighting off one set of invasions, and did not last the century fighting off a second set; but from at least the time of King Alfred, as the Anglo-Saxon state was formed, it also coalesced around a cultural center other than Rome or Jerusalem.
Each of the corners, by contrast, is distinguished and distinct: the separate landmass of the British Isles in the northwest, the giant drawing of the lion in the northeast, and the fiery waters and mountains of the southern corners. In this scheme, Britain itself then maps its own marginality on to Ireland, which ends up inside a fourth L-shaped frame of water northwest of Britain a€“ a move that to a degree displaces Brittania as one of feowerum foldan sceatum, and brings England further in from the edge.
But the blankness of this area can provide two functions: first, it reinforces the mapa€™s accentuation of England by providing another curving blank space, this time of land, to frame the British Isles. Bede echoes this sentiment, noting that in relation to Spain, Gaul and Germany, or a€?greater Europea€™ (maximis Europae) Britain stands a€?at a great distance against thema€™ (multo interuallo aduersa).
In this sense, the mappamundi eerily refuses to recognize the very regions that will directly enable the Norman Conquest of Anglo- Saxon England, only decades (perhaps less) after the map was made.
At the same time, however, the Cottoniana map enacts a strategy similar to that found in the Old English Orosius, and emphasizes the Anglo-Saxon world even as it works within a distinctly Roman source. In the a€?big picturea€™ of the mappamundi, England appears literally as one of the feowerum foldan sceatum, tucked far away from the center of the map, with only Ireland and Tylen, or ultimate Thule, closer to the physical corner of the manuscript page. 36 x 14 x 38, Blade Included Yes, Volts 120, Cordless No, Cutting Angles 0-55, Blade Size L x W x Thickness in. And even as the Cotton map acknowledges the liminal world that is the origin of the Angelcynn, it also promotes their geographic desires and anxieties that England, ultimately, should also be a center, not a corner, of the world. Second, the mapa€™s omission of Englanda€™s closest continental neighbors might not only reveal an eagerness to distance Anglo-Saxon England from its classical definitions, but also perhaps consciously deny a particular aspect of its current political situation. From Isidore and Orosius, Bede specifically preserves the term adversa, the word fraught not only with locative, but potentially negative connotations (e.g. Harris has recently demonstrated, Anglo-Saxons likely viewed the Daci as synonymous with Dani (the Danes), and Gothi (derived from GetA¦) as the same as the Geats, the famous, if somewhat a historical Scandinavian tribe of Beowulf fame.
As noted above, the L-shaped England echoes the forms of the larger geographies that contain it, that of Europe, and then that of the world. Could they refer to the conflict between the Saxons and the native Britons in the centuries following the departure of the Romans early in the fifth century, which gave rise to the legend of King Arthur? Most of the Biblical names found on the Hereford, Lambert, Henry of Mainz, the Psalter, and Ebstorf maps are perhaps, in many cases, borrowed directly from this earlier Anglo-Saxon work. Likewise, Scithia, here positioned east and slightly north of the island containing the scridefinnas (who are also mentioned in the Old English Orosius), might also have a presumed Scandinavian affiliation.
Likewise, in England, the cities of Winchester and London, the twin capitals of the Anglo-Saxon world, hold the same relative position as does Rome and its lesser cities in the shape of Europe. Nearby is the region of containment of the tribes of Gog and Magog, situated near the northern ocean.
Gallia commonly occurs in most other medieval maps of this region, both earlier and later than the Cottoniana map, precisely because of this marginalizing textual tradition. Rome may still dominate the cartography of Europe, but, in the framed world of England, London and Winchester occupy the same space, and suggest a willingness and desire to assume a similar role. Ker dates the manuscript to the first quarter of the 11th century, though he notes that the composition of some of the material (e.g. The Cottoniana map, however, largely resists such characterization as adversa maximis Europae, choosing both to elide the classical inscriptions of Gaul and Germany, and then to leave the region almost entirely void.
As Harris points out, King Alfreda€™s ninth century political victories over Danish enemies in England validate Anglo-Saxon Christendom over pagan beliefs from another edge of the world. And, finally, it bares some indications of a much later time, the age of the discoveries and the migration of the Northmen in the eighth, ninth, and 10th centuries.A  The correspondences of various names and descriptions in Adam of Bremen afford at least a possibility that the former sometimes drew from the same originals as the great northern annalist, while some of the names in the British Isles, in Gaul [France], and in the Far East and northeast, support the 10th century date, which most scholars are inclined to accept.
Similarly, Nicholas Howe chronicles how Anglo-Saxon missionaries journeying a€?backa€™ to Germanic heathendom replicate the pattern of and then supersede Augustinea€™s original mission from Rome to Canterbury.
In both examples, Anglo-Saxon activities work to define new cultural edges in relation to an understood English centre. See Catalogue of Manuscripts Containing Anglo-Saxon (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1957), item 193, pp. The Cottoniana map operates as a graphic analogue to such literary and conversionary efforts. The elision of contemporary France may possibly derive from a combination of a Roman source and an understandable emphasis on Scandinavian regions.
If the map was drawn around 1050, this elision may also express the negative attitudes towards Normandy developing rapidly among some Anglo-Saxon factions.
Even if the absence of France and Normandy is a product of early ninth or 10th century Anglo-Saxon cultural concerns, this omission certainly could have taken on new meaning around 1050.
The name really has nothing to do with the color of the moon, but rather the strawberry harvest. Christine's father, Robert Mueller, was Grand Marshal of South Haven's Memorial Day parade this year. A layer of thin ice formed over the snow throughout Southwestern Michigan earlier this week when freezing rain came through the area. The cold temperatures caused the ice to remain, creating a protective shimmering layer over the snow. Whatever you call it, this type of moon, with its orange-yellow hue, and larger-than-normal looking appearance, has only shown up three times this year. Super moons occur when the moon is closest to Earth as it travels along its eliptical orbit. A group that goes by the name of Artesian Bubbleheads of Ann Arbor came to South Haven Sunday and Monday to entertain beach-goers using wands to createA  large bubbles. The group goes to various areas of the state to entertain people at beaches and other public places. People like to walk on the North and South piers when waves crash ove them, but emergency officials warn that doing so can be dangerous, due to the strength of the waves and winds that could wash people off the piers. Mark Savage managed to get a shot of the squirrel last week while it was on the run in his yard in Geneva Township. When Geneva Township residents Kelly and Scott Weber brought their candy corn flowering plant inside for the winter, little did they know a tiny spicebush swallowtail butterfly egg lay hidden beneath one of the leaves.
Much to their surprise, a young swallowtail butterfly emerged from its cocoon this past week. To keep the little creature strong and healthy, the couple has purchased two hyacinth plants for it to munch on. Thompson had traveled to South Haven to help his mother recover from surgery and snapped this photo on Monroe Boulevard, near South Beach. But recently, a group of wild turkeys decided to munch on the seeds that were left on the ground.
But walking on the ice can prove deadly because open areas of water still exist and ice is often unstable on Lake Michigan. No incidents of people falling through the ice have been reported in South Haven, however, Grand Haven police dealt with six ice-related incidents during the weekend of Feb. But, Rural Ramblings website and several other websites that deal with birds, say people shouldn't get too excited about seeing Robins this time of year.
The game is an annual matchup between the two teams and was sponsored by the Bangor Historical Society.
The tractors traveled from the Flywheelers' museum grounds in Geneva Township to South Haven's downtown to enjoy an evening meal.
According to Bangor residents, even though signs are posted warning about the crossing, several times a year a truck with a long trailer will get stuck. PietrzykowskiA South Haven's lighthouse was shrouded in fog prior to the start of the Light up the Lake fireworks display, July 3. Mom and daughter were enjoying an afternoon this past week at the Optimist's Tot Lot in South Haven.
After three dry days of sunshine snow is expected to return Tuesday, with 3-6 inches expected to fall. The snow creatures were created by the couple's friends, Beth Pepper, Becky Durden, Jackson Clark, Mattie Clark and Tim Durden and several other family members. Terri Abbott puts her own spin on that tradition by performing a cartwheel over home base in the Old-fashioned baseball game between the the House of David and the Bangor Cubs.
The House of David catcher was apparently so surprised by Abbott's spur-of-the-moment theatrics that he never tagged her out.
Scattered thunderstorms are expected this afternoon throughout southwestern Michigan as warm temperatures continue. Six to eight inches of snow fell on the South Haven area from Thursday evening through Saturday. The Grand Junction man said the little flowers have never sprouted during winter in the 32 years he's lived at his home.
Approximately 30-40 youngsters and their parents and grandparents attended the event this past week. Michigan DNR introduced 139 Perigrines into Michigan, with 31 released in the Lower Peninsula.
She and more than a hundred youngsters took part in the National Blueberry Festival pie-eating contest, Aug. Emily belongs to Cori Perkins, a volunteer for Adopt a Freind for Life, a group in Paw Paw that helps find homes for abused, abandoned and stray animals.
South Haven's Harborfest is a favorite amoung dog owners because of its dog-freindly atmosphere. However, this week's weather picture has changed, and temperatures are hovering in the 30s and 40s. They made more than 200 Valentines to send to the Veterans Administration Hospital in Battle Creek. Army PFC Alexandrea Snyder (left) and SPC Tash Johnson sit next to the care package they received courtesy of volunteers from the South Haven area during the holiday season. The care package donations were organized through South Haven Township resident Joan Pioch.
Pioch organized a group of residents to help purchase, pack and ship the items to soldiers from the area serving overseas. Temperatures were in the low 60s for the start of the fair on Saturday, and winds challenged crafters as they set up their booths, but by Sunday the winds died down and people came out in droves to view the more than 200 booths at Stanley Johnston Park. Their long proboscis and hovering behavior, accompanied by an audible humming noise, make them look very much like a hummingbird while feeding on flowers, according to information Wikipedia, the online encyclopedia. The girls' great-grandmother Lorrie Getman of South Haven took them to the beach to enjoy one of the few days of sunshine during the week of spring break.



Ways to make a girl happy in a relationship quotes
Wikihow how to get a boyfriend in middle school


Comments to «Looking for a band northern ireland»

  1. ValeriA writes:
    Vegas and have the opportunity of being with you.
  2. QIZIL_OQLAN writes:
    Offers you unimaginable access to your.
  3. kaltoq writes:
    Concept of your boyfriend discovering somebody new that.
  4. Layla writes:
    Bundle, you may get our.
  5. Ronaldinio writes:
    Two do get back collectively, it will out, like.