What makes a good team leader presentation,writing that works communicating effectively on the job 10th edition pdf,soccer coaching courses edmonton,how do i know if ive been divorced - Test Out

IU will honor the GlobalNOC's past and future at a 15th anniversary celebration Tuesday, Sept. Indiana University has implemented the Kuali Coeus Institutional Review Board, a comprehensive online system for the submission, review and approval of human subjects research. The National Center for Genome Analysis and Support (NCGAS) has announced new services to help biological researchers store and share their work, speeding scientific discovery and breakthroughs in many fields of study. Registration is now open for the IEEE Cluster 2013 conference, hosted by IU's Pervasive Technology Institute, September 23-27 at the Hilton Indianapolis. Professors Thomas Sterling and Andrew Lumsdaine will deliver keynotes and lead workshops, tutorials and discussions on a variety of topics at the 2013 International Supercomputing Conference, the world's oldest global conference and exhibition for high performance computing, networking and storage.
The center of the universe will be in Indianapolis June 2 to 6, at least as far as the study of the universe is concerned, as more than 500 scientists, educators and journalists are expected for the 222nd meeting of the American Astronomical Society. IEEE Cluster 2013 conference organizers today announced the featured speakers at this year's event. With privacy concerns addressed, Indiana University has re-released the free app Kinsey Reporter, a global mobile survey platform for collecting and reporting anonymous data about sexual and other intimate behaviors.
NASA's Operation IceBridge mission wraps up its spring flight season this week, gathering radar data about Earth's polar ice sheets to help scientists better understand global climate change. Indiana University confirmed its leadership in high performance, data-intensive computing by unveiling Big Red II, a powerful new supercomputer with a processing speed of one thousand trillion floating-point operations per second (one petaFLOPS).
Indiana University's new supercomputer is expected to further advance international collaborations reliant on big data research at a time when the globalization of education, science and research is omnipresent. Indiana University and Internet2 announced a $2 million initiative to stimulate collaboration in higher education cybersecurity efforts in response to President Obama's cybersecurity challenge. This week the HathiTrust Research Center (HTRC) announced the availability of data mining and analytics tools for the HathiTrust Digital Library, a collection of digital texts from over 70 research libraries around the world. The TechPoint Mira Awards recognized Indiana University for the deployment of IUanyWare, a cloud-based service that provides IU students, faculty and staff with on-demand access to over 200 software applications.
Indiana University has saved nearly $20 million by joining with other universities to reduce administrative costs for essential financial software systems. IUanyWare, Indiana University's cloud software service, is a 2013 recipient of ACUTA's prestigious Institutional Excellence award.
Indiana University shares its expertise in advanced networking with the launch of a new lecture series for state business and industry leaders.
Kuali People Management for the Enterprise (KPME) announces the release of version 1.5, designed to meet the human resources needs of higher education.
Indiana University today announces SAGE as the latest publisher to sign on to its eTexts initiative. Indiana University has announced an agreement with Cengage Learning to provide eTexts for students on all IU campuses. IEEE Cluster 2013 conference organizers are seeking input from the high performance computing community, in an effort to make the "Clusters and Cyberinfrastructure Strategy" event as informative as possible. Nearly 10,000 Indiana University students are using digital textbooks (eTexts) this spring semester as part of IU's pioneering eTexts initiative. Indiana University's Center for Research in Extreme Scale Technologies (CREST) is the recipient of a three-year, $1.1 million grant from the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop software that improves the speed and programmability of supercomputers.
The Indiana Center for Network Translational Research and Education (InCNTRE) at Indiana University is hosting its first single-controller vendor Software-Defined Networking (SDN) Lab PlugFest this Feb. Indiana University and Adobe are partnering to present Adobe Days 2013 on the IUPUI and IU Bloomington campuses.
Vital research collaborations involving China, Europe and the United States will be safeguarded through the first major agreement among partners running the two main high-speed research and education (R&E) Internet routes across Asia, Europe and North America. Thomas Sterling, executive associate director of the Center for Research in Extreme Scale Technologies (CREST) and professor of computer science in the IU School of Informatics and Computing, has been named an HPCwire person to watch in 2013. The Indiana Center for Network Translational Research and Education (InCNTRE) has announced that Steve Wallace will step into the role of acting executive director.
Indiana University's IT Communications Office recently received several awards from the Chicago chapter of the Society for Technical Communication (STC).
Network architects from a range of Fortune 500 companies will converge on the Indiana Center for Network Translational Research and Education (InCNTRE) on Wednesday, January 23, to take part in a new user group promoting OpenFlow and other software-defined networking (SDN) technologies.
The National Center for Genome Analysis Support (NCGAS) is expanding its reach by adding tools, services and partners to help biological research communities make important new scientific discoveries.
With 6 billion mobile phone subscriptions worldwide -- that's about 87 percent of the world population -- and an even higher percentage of users estimated on campuses, Indiana University has embarked on a mobile security campaign to heighten awareness about the tools available to safeguard users and their products.
The organizing committee for the IEEE* Cluster 2013 conference is now accepting proposals for tutorials, technical papers, posters, panels, and visualizations.
A recent networking breakthrough from IU researchers, in collaboration with Orange Silicon Valley and DataDirect Networks, showed that data sharing can be faster and more efficient over wide area networks (WAN). Researchers from Indiana University's Pervasive Technology Institute will serve as collaborating partners on a major grant from the U.S. Indiana University today announced the successor to its internationally recognized Data Capacitor research data storage platform. Indiana University networking experts were recently recognized by Internet2 for their efforts to enhance broadband connectivity and support advanced services and cloud applications across the United States.
IU will replace its current Data Capacitor with Data Capacitor II, a high-speed, high-capacity storage facility for very large data sets. Indiana University will display its leadership in high performance computing and networking technologies at the annual International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage and Analysis, also known as SC12 (Supercomputing 2012). QuakeSim, an Indiana University-supported collection of online data and tools from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and multiple university partners, is a recipient of NASA's 2012 Software of the Year Award.
Data vital to understanding global climate change will benefit from more efficient and secure processing, thanks to a new tool created by members of Indiana University's Research Technologies Systems. Recording light from millions of light years away and then sending it to the Indiana University Data Center at the corner of 10th Street and state Rt.
Indiana University announced today (September 14) an agreement with Elsevier's Science & Technology Books division to provide eTexts for students on all IU campuses. A recent National Science Foundation (NSF) grant will further enable Indiana University to help scientists solve their toughest data problems.
Indiana University and Ivy Tech Community College have announced a technology support partnership to help college students use technology for increased success.
Indiana University has signed agreements with technology providers CourseNetworking LLC and Instructure Inc. The Apache Software Foundation recently asked Suresh Marru of the Indiana University Pervasive Technology Institute to join its exclusive membership. The announcement July 4 that scientists have observed a new particle that may be the elusive Higgs boson spelled success for Indiana University researchers who worked for years on a massive experiment that detected the particle.
Internet2 announced today, July 20, that Indiana University President Michael McRobbie was elected as the sixth chair of the board of trustees and will serve until July 2015. Key software used to study gene expression now runs four times faster, thanks to performance improvements put in place by a team from the Indiana University Pervasive Technology Institute (PTI), the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard and Technische Universitat Dresden. Indiana University has received a Campus Technology 2012 Innovators Award for the development of IUanyWARE, a cloud-based service that provides students, faculty and staff with on-demand access to hundreds of software applications. The announcement last week that scientists have observed a new particle that may be the elusive Higgs boson spelled success for Indiana University researchers who worked for years on a massive experiment that detected the particle. Leaders from the China Education and Research Network (CERNET), IU, Internet2, and the Chinese government met Thursday, June 21, at Tsinghua University in Beijing, China to demonstrate unique applications now possible over a new10Gbps internet link between the education and research networks of the US and China.
Beginning July 1, Indiana University will establish a new Office of Scholarly Publishing, newly appointed IU executive vice president and provost of the Bloomington campus Lauren Robel announced.
Indiana University is again leading the way to better health care by enabling scientists to share research more rapidly and securely over the Internet. Indiana University received a $492,588 National Science Foundation grant to help scientists study rising sea levels and the impact of storm surge on coastal communities. Networking giant Cisco is the latest company to join InCNTRE's Software-Defined Networking Interoperability Lab, the world's only neutral, third-party testing lab for SDN. IDG's CIO magazine has honored Indiana University as a recipient of the 2012 CIO 100 award. The Sakai Foundation recently selected its 2012 Sakai Fellows, and three of the six recipients have direct ties to Indiana University.
Indiana University and Pearson are working together to reduce the costs of digital textbooks for students on all IU campuses.
Senior, higher education executives announced today that they will use the nation's fastest, coast-to-coast network to implement new technologies that support scientific "Big Data" and cloud applications to drive innovation in global collaborative research.
Egyptian air and naval forces have found some of the passengers' "personal belongings" and debris of EgyptAir Flight MS804, which crashed while carrying 66 passengers and crew from Paris to Cairo, the army said on Friday.
The debris was found around 280 kilometers north of the port city of Alexandria, Egyptian army spokesman Mohammed Samir said in a statement posted on his Facebook page. A team of Egyptian investigators led by Ayman el-Mokadam - along with French and British investigators and an expert from Airbus - will inspect what the army has found, Egyptian officials said. The plane fell off the radar at 2:45 am local time on Thursday while it was crossing the Mediterranean sea. The office of Egypt's president, Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, issued a statement expressing its condolences to the relatives of the 66 killed. The statement marked the first official recognition by Egypt's government that the missing plane had crashed.
France, Greece, Italy, Cyprus and the United Kingdom had all joined the Egyptian search effort, Egypt's defense ministry said.
The Greek Defense Minister Panos Kammenos said that the plane swerved wildly before plummeting into the sea. Yet France's foreign minister Jean-Marc Ayrault asserted on Friday that there is "absolutely no indication" of what caused the crash. The junior minister for transport, Alain Vidalies, said that "no theory is favored" at this stage and urged "the greatest caution". Amid fears the plane was downed by an extremist attack, Vidalies defended security at Paris's Charles de Gaulle Airport, saying staff badges are revoked if there is the slightest security doubt. Families of the victims spent the night in a hotel in Cairo while they awaited the news of their loved ones. Police arrested 32-year-old Kenneth Franklin Shinzato, a former US Marine on Thursday, following evidence leading them to find he had dumped the dead body of 20-year-old Rina Shimabukuro in a forested area on the night of April 28 or in the early hours of the morning thereafter.
Shimabukuro, a company employee working in Uruma city, went missing on April 28 after going for a walk, with the official filing of her disappearance being made the following day to the police by her boyfriend.
The former Marine was subsequently questioned by the police as he was potentially in the same area as Shimabukuro according to GPS data triangulated from her phone and based on traffic records. Police later identified a body as being that of the missing woman through her dental and DNA records. Shinzato, who works at the US Air Force's Kadena Air Base and lives with his wife and child, admitted to the police he dumped the corpse in the wooded area after she stopped moving and that he had in fact strangled her.
The latest case follows a US Navy sailor being arrested in March suspected of raping a woman in a hotel in Naha City, the capital of Okinawa. The latest murder and previous attacks have led to strong condemnation from the people of Okinawa and has seen instances of growing anti-US sentiment on the island amid a growing spat between the central government and prefectural officials about a plan to relocate a controversial US base within the island. Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said on Friday that he will bring up the case with US President Barack Obama, with the issue potentially clouding the Group of Seven leaders' summit to be held in Japan next week. Protesters stage a rally outside Kadena Air Base in Okinawa after a US citizen working on a US military base was arrested.
Desperate Sri Lankans clambered onto rubber dinghies and makeshift rafts on Friday to flee their homes in the flooded capital Colombo as officials said half a million people had fled their homes across the island. The heaviest rains in a quarter of a century have pounded the island since last weekend, sparking huge landslides that have buried victims in up to 15 meters of mud. Officials have urged those living in affected areas to leave immediately, with more than 60 people known to have died so far and fears that number could spike with many more reported missing.
Housewife Diluka Ishani said she, her husband and two children were marooned on high ground and were plucked to safety by the navy and brought to a nearby school.
Around 30 families were camped out at the school where the military were providing food and drinking water.
President Maithripala Sirisena urged citizens to help with caring for nearly half a million people affected by floods in many parts of the island.
Large parts of Colombo were evacuated overnight in an operation led by the military, involving boats and helicopters. The national Disaster Management Centre said 21 of Sri Lanka's 25 districts had been affected.
Three people have been killed in flood-related incidents in Colombo but the national toll now stands at 63.
The district of Kegalle, about 100 kilometers northeast of Colombo, has been worst-hit, with the toll from two separate landslides rising to 34 after troops pulled another body from the mud overnight. A police officer in the area said 144 people, including 37 children, had been reported missing since the landslides on Tuesday evening.
Israel's defense minister announced his resignation on Friday, citing a lack of "trust" in Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu after reports that he is soon to be replaced. Netanyahu and Yaalon have clashed in recent days over the role of the military in public discourse, with the prime minister arguing that military officials should not discuss policy matters publicly. Tensions between Yaalon and Netanyahu escalated in March, when military leaders criticized a soldier who was caught on video fatally shooting an already-wounded Palestinian attacker. Reports over the past few days indicate that Netanyahu intends to appoint former foreign minister Avigdor Lieberman to the post. Netanyahu this week invited Lieberman's Yisrael Beteinu party to shore up his shaky parliamentary coalition and negotiation teams have been meeting to hammer out the details of their alliance. Cabinet Minister Gila Gamliel said that Yaalon's leaving is a "tremendous loss" for the ruling Likud party.
Frescoed barracks which once housed the cavalry of the Emperor Hadrian's bodyguard have returned to light 19 centuries on, during excavations for a new underground train line in Rome.
In a find hailed as "unique" by archaeologists, weapons rooms, dormitories, kitchens and stables where some of ancient Rome's crack troops once lodged now lie open to the sky near the Colosseum, where the "Amba Aradam" stop of the Metro C line is being dug. Uncovering broken pots, Roman coins or that archaeological staple, a series of low walls, is all in a day's work for head engineer Andrea Sciotti, particularly near the ancient forums and gladiator battling ground and training schools. Work here is steaming ahead to create the first "archaeological station" in Rome, which Francesco Prosperetti, the capital's superintendent of archaeology, hopes will outdo other impressive metro "museums" from Athens to Naples, Porto and Vienna.
The digs for Rome's much-needed third metro line, which will connect 30 stations in the tourist-heavy Eternal City, began in 2007 but have been delayed repeatedly by the discovery of buried artefacts and it is not expected to be fully open before 2021.
Amid the diggers and scaffolding lie the remains of 39 rooms of barracks where hundreds of soldiers - the so-called equites singulares augusti, one of the elite corps of the Praetorian Guard - were housed during the 2nd century AD.
Archaeologists also found a collective grave on the site, where they have so far unearthed 13 adult skeletons and a bronze bracelet.
The cavalry guard, which escorted the Roman emperor whenever he left the city, were so fierce they were used by successive leaders to quash unruly mobs in street battles and boost military campaigns abroad.
Black and white mosaics decorate the barracks floors, and frescoes in Pompeian red can be seen on some of the remaining walls. The find brings the total number of known military garrisons in the area to five, with one of the most important resting under the nearby Saint John Lateran basilica, the pope's seat in Rome.
An Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research poll released on Friday said 72 percent support paid family leave.
At least 19 states are considering paid family leave laws, but only three have active programs. The federal Family and Medical Leave Act provides for up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave for most workers to care for a newborn or adopted child or a spouse, child or parent who is seriously ill. A bill to make that leave paid was introduced in the Senate last year but has gone nowhere in Congress. Morelli, 52, said she expects that someday she'll need time off to care for her aging mother and in-laws who are now in their 80s. Paid family leave works like insurance and is funded via mandatory contributions from workers' paychecks.
In October, when the 54-episode Chinese historical drama Nirvana in Fire was aired in South Korea, with Korean subtitles, it became a buzz word on South Korea's social media, People's Daily reported. Nirvana in Fire, set in 6th-century China, tells of the tale of a protagonist's quest for justice and to erase a family blemish. The series was shown on Chunghwa TV based in Seoul and got the sixth-highest rating among South Korean cable channels, also ranking for a time seventh in pay-to-view dramas online. Amid the many high-quality South Korean dramas, it's rare for a foreign production to squeeze into the top 10. He also said Scarlet Heart, a 2011 production on Qing Dynasty (1644-1911) royal families, and The Empress of China, on the early years China's only female monarch, of Wu Zetian (624-705), are highly welcomed series from China.
The Empress of China, which is still on air, ranked the 4th among the country's cable TV in terms of rating.
Hopes faded on Thursday for the survival of about 150 people trapped under the mud and rubble of two landslides in Sri Lanka, as heavy rain hampered rescue operations and the official death toll from the disaster rose to 41. Rescue work had resumed early in morning before fresh rains began, but was halted for about an hour as minor landslides made the work dangerous. That figure is likely to rise sharply, as authorities battling muddy conditions began to give up hope of reaching 134 people believed to be trapped under rubble at one site, and 16 at another, before time ran out.
Military spokesman Brigadier Jayanath Jayaweera said in the capital Colombo that the army was assessing the situation and would deploy more troops if needed.
Heavy rains have lashed the island nation for several days and officials said the extent of the tragedy was still unclear. Jayaweera said that the army had so far rescued 156 people trapped by landslides and more than 1,550 people are being sheltered in nine shelters. Heavy fog, rain, electrical outages and the loose ground have made it difficult to search for survivors. Villagers said torrents of muddy water, tree branches and debris came crashing down on Tuesday around their homes in the three villages in Kegalle district, about 70 kilometers north of Colombo.
Near the village of Elangapitiya - furthest down the hill - soldiers on Wednesday carried bodies to a school, where families waited for news of missing loved ones.
Farmer Hewapelige Lal said he had identified the body of his nephew, but that 18 other family members were possibly buried under the mud.
During heavy rains in December 2014, authorities evacuated more than 60,000 people from thousands of homes damaged or destroyed by floods or landslides. A Nigerian schoolgirl rescued after two years of being held captive by Boko Haram militants will meet with President Muhammadu Buhari on Thursday amid hopes that she can help shed light on the whereabouts of more than 200 other missing girls.
Soldiers working with a civilian patrol group rescued the girl, named Amina Ali Darsha Nkeki, on Tuesday near Damboa in the remote northeast with officials confirming she was one of 219 girls abducted from a secondary school in Chibok. An army spokesman said she was found with her four-month old baby and a "suspected Boko Haram terrorist" called Mohammed Hayatu, who claimed to be the girl's husband, was also detained.



Her mother in an interview last year said Ali's father had died some months after her daughter was kidnapped with the stress taking a toll on his health.
Presidential spokesman Garba Shehu told Reuters that the girl is currently in Maiduguri, the capital of Borno state, but will be brought to the national capital Abuja to meet Buhari. Ali's rescue should give a boost to Buhari, a former military ruler who made crushing the Boko Haram Islamist insurgency a pillar of his presidential campaign in 2015.
Boko Haram captured 276 girls from a school in Chibok, northeast Nigeria, in April 2014, as part of a seven-year-old insurgency to set up an Islamic state in the north which has killed some 15,000 people and displaced more than 2 million. Some girls escaped in the melee but parents of the remaining missing girls accused former President Goodluck Jonathan, Nigeria's then leader, of not doing enough to find their daughters whose disappearance sparked a global "Bring Back Our Girls" campaign.
Ali's mother, Binta Ali Nkeki, last year spoke of her daughter's fear of Boko Haram but of her enjoyment of attending school and doing well at her studies.
Her mother told the Murtala Muhammed Foundation, a Nigerian nonprofit organization researching a book on the missing Chibok girls, that she was not sure of the age of Ali, the youngest of her 13 children although only three survived their early years.
Protesters in Paris and elsewhere alleged the police have instigated the violence during a series of demonstrations against a controversial labor reform. Cadot told a news conference that about 15 protesters, some masked, attacked the car and threw a Molotov cocktail at it, setting it alight. Vanina Giudicelli, one of the protesters at the Republique, said the police gathering was "a real provocation".
Jean-Claude Delage, secretary-general of the Alliance police union, denounced an "escalation of violence" in the labor protests and said some people were harassing police officers with projectiles and Molotov cocktails and even hitting them with bars. French President Francois Hollande said on Tuesday that more than 350 police officers have been injured in clashes and 60 people have been convicted amid the labor reform protests.
A police car was set on fire by protesters in Paris on Wednesday, injuring two officers who were in the vehicle.
That train - called "Jaldoot" or the Messenger of Water - brings millions of liters of the precious liquid that the drought-plagued central Indian district so desperately needs. Latur, with its ravaged farmland and thirsty families, has become the unfortunate poster child for the blistering drought that is hurting tens of millions of people across 13 Indian states. With the monsoon rains still at least a month away, the water train, which started running in April, is a desperate measure to ease a desperate situation. Nowhere is the tragedy more heartbreaking than in the stoic silence of 30-year-old Ranjana Umesh Jadav, whose husband fell into a well several kilometers from his home and died as he tried to fetch water for his family after their taps and the village well ran dry. As Marathwada's crisis worsened over the last two years the state government decided to start sending a water train.
A medieval step well next to the Miraj train station serves as the filling point for the water train. Mixed Martial Arts is trying to shrug off its image as an ultraviolent, inhuman and even degrading sport in France, where it is banned for pros but loved by amateurs.
Combining elements from boxing, judo, karate and wrestling, MMA is allowed across Europe except in France and Norway. It is played barefoot and without a helmet, while hands are protected only with fingerless gloves. Despite the ban, the discipline has proved irresistible to tens of thousands of amateurs in France. At age 24, he became one of the only French professionals to compete in the premier Ultimate Fighting Championship in the United States, having trained in his home country but able only to compete abroad. The rules, which are internationally standardized, do allow contestants to be hit, even in the head, when they are on the mat. A player can win through a knockout blow, submission - locking the opponent in one of many types of holds - or a referee's decision. The octagonal "cage" in which the fighting is held is designed to protect contestants - and spectators - when they are thrown. Matthieu Quidu, a sports professor at Lyon's Ecole Normale Superieure, a prestigious university, has begun attracting more and more enthusiasts to his MMA class. But the results, published in The Lancet Psychiatry peer-reviewed medical journal, were encouraging enough to merit further trials, he said. All of the subjects had tried at least two standard drug treatments without success, and most had also undergone psychotherapy. Clinical depression is a debilitating disease that affects tens of millions of people worldwide. Antidepressants and talk therapy don't work for about one in five patients, highlighting the need for alternate treatments. Psilocybin stimulates receptors for serotonin, a naturally occurring chemical in the brain that affects mood.
In the experiment, Carhart-Harris and colleagues gave two doses of psilocybin, a week apart, to six men and six women suffering moderate to severe depression. They all reported mild nervousness as the drug took hold within 30 to 60 minutes, but there were no serious side-effects. Each session lasted six hours - with "peaking" occurring half way through - and was monitored by two psychiatrists. After three months, seven of the patients continued to show improvement, and five were still in remission. These results "are promising but not completely compelling," commented Philip Cowen, a clinical scientist and professor at the University of Oxford. Given the small number of subjects and lack of a control group, "it is impossible to attribute clinical efficacy to the drug," said Jonathan Flint, a professor of neuroscience at the University of Oxford.
Kenya's authorities tore down a badly built residential block in a poor Nairobi district on Tuesday, one of more than 250 shoddy buildings that could now face demolition after a six-story structure collapsed this month killing 51 people. Nearby, residents of another condemned block in Mathare scrambled to wrap up utensils and other items in bed sheets and stuffed plastic bags with clothes as workers ripped out door and window frames to prepare for machinery to destroy the structure. The Kenyan authorities have identified 258 buildings considered structurally at risk and which could be pulled down, leaving thousands of people to find new homes in a city already struggling to keep pace with its growing population.
Kenyan authorities are stepping up evictions of poorly built buildings after a six-storey block in Huruma district - which lies next to Mathare - collapsed on April 29 after days of rain. Officials said it had been condemned before it crumbled and said it was not clear why it had not been pulled down.
The death toll of 51 people could have been more if some residents had not seen cracks and fled shortly before it fell. Yet knocking down dangerous buildings also adds to the housing shortage in Nairobi, which is estimated to have a population of more than 4 million, almost double 15 years ago. Keeping pace with housing for a growing population is a challenge afflicting cities across Africa, where millions of people every year are leaving the fields and pouring into cities to find jobs, spawning spontaneous and ill-planned new suburbs. In Nigeria's sprawling commercial hub, Lagos, a church hostel collapse in 2014 crushed 115 people.
In Cairo, builders often pile new floors onto existing structures with little planning or reinforcement of foundations, making collapses a fairly frequent event.
Of the 10 million people added to Africa's urban population each year, about two thirds end up in slums, according to UN Habitat, which held a meeting in March in Nigeria about ways to improve living conditions in Africa's slums.
A man stands in a dilapidated building slated for demolition in the Mathare neighborhood of Nairobi, Kenya, on Tuesday. Health Minister Alejandro Gaviria's remarks in an interview on Tuesday are the strongest yet in an increasingly public fight with the world's biggest drugmaker that could set a precedent for middle-income countries grappling to contain rising prices for complex drugs. Memos leaked last week to a nonprofit group, written from the Colombian Embassy in Washington, describe intense lobbying pressure on Colombia, a staunch US ally, from the pharmaceutical industry and its allies in the US Congress. In one memo, the embassy warns that breaking Novartis' patent for the leukemia drug Gleevec could hurt US support for Colombia's bid to join the proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership trade zone and even jeopardize $450 million in US assistance for a peace deal with leftist rebels.
Gaviria, an economist by training, said the pressure shows the forceful steps that the pharmaceutical industry is willing to take to protect its commercial interests.
Government health programs in many countries are being squeezed by high prices for newly launched drugs and by annual price hikes of 10 percent or more for medicines long on the market, and they are increasingly pushing back by demanding big discounts or setting price caps on ultraexpensive drugs. Novartis has rejected Gaviria's proposal to reduce the price for Gleevec to 140 pesos (5 US cents) per milligram.
In an April 20 letter, Novartis' local affiliate said that it doesn't consider it convenient to initiate negotiations over prices and that the decision to override patents should be taken only in exceptional circumstances and not used as a bargaining tool. Same sex marriage is currently permitted in Mexico City, as well as in several states including Coahuila, Quintana Roo, Jalisco, Nayarit, Chihuahua and Sonora. Mexico's Supreme Court said last year that laws restricting marriage to a man and woman were unconstitutional and a Supreme Court judge urged states to legalize gay marriage. However, many state legislatures have not changed their statutes to comply, meaning couples must file legal challenges case by case to get married. The president's office asked Congress to change Mexico's constitution to guarantee adults the right to marry without restrictions based on gender, sexual preference, or other reasons. Both the presidency and Pena Nieto's Twitter avatars were overlaid with the rainbow flag of gay pride to mark the international day against homophobia and transphobia.
Grappling with deadly drug cartel violence, Pena Nieto last month sent a proposal to Congress to permit the use and importation of marijuana-based medicines. Growing and selling marijuana is illegal in Mexico but is the mainstay business of violent drug gangs.
A couple kiss as they celebrate International Day Against Homophobia in Guatemala City, Guatemala, on Tuesday, when same sex marriage was proposed for all of Mexico. A joint US-Australian military research team is running a series of 10 trials at the world's largest land testing range, Woomera in South Australia, and at Norway's Andoya Rocket Range. Scientists have said hypersonic technology could cut traveling time from Sydney to London to as little as two hours for the 17,000-kilometer flight.
Scientists involved in the program - called Hypersonic International Flight Research Experimentation - are developing an engine that can fly at Mach 7, said Michael Smart of the University of Queensland.
He added that the scramjet was a supersonic combustion engine that uses oxygen from the atmosphere for fuel, making it lighter and faster than fuel-carrying rockets.
The experimental rocket in the trial on Wednesday reached an altitude of 278 kilometers and a target speed of Mach 7.5, Australia's defense department said.
Each test builds on previous ones, with the latest used to measure heat on the outside of a vehicle in hypersonic flight, Smart said.
The next test, scheduled for 2017, would involve the scramjet engine separating from the rocket booster and flying on its own, he added. UN spokesman Stephane Dujarric said 29 allegations were reported in the UN peacekeeping mission in the Central African Republic, seven in the UN mission in Congo, and two in the mission in Haiti. The United Nations has been in the spotlight for months over allegations of child rape and other sexual abuses by its peacekeepers, especially those based in Central African Republic and Congo. The UN reported on March 31 that 108 girls and women had come forward with sexual abuse accusations against international peacekeepers in Kemo prefecture in Central African Republic, dating from 2013 through 2015.
Dujarric said Tuesday there was no update on that investigation which is being conducted by the UN's Office of Internal Oversight Services. The UN has 105,000 peacekeepers deployed in 16 hot spots around the world as well as political missions in a host of countries including Afghanistan, Iraq and Somalia. Dujarric said 35 of the allegations reported this year involve UN military personnel - including 11 from Congo, six from the neighboring Republic of Congo, three from Morocco and three from South Africa - and four allegations involve UN police. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has recommended that UN peacekeepers accused of sexual abuse and exploitation be court martialed in the countries where the alleged incidents take place - and Dujarric said South Africa has announced that it will court martial a soldier in Congo where he is serving, which would be a first. The US Senate passed legislation on Tuesday that would allow families of victims of the Sept 11, 2001 attacks to sue Saudi Arabia's government for damages, setting up a potential showdown with the White House, which has threatened a veto.
The White House has repeatedly stated that Obama, who visited the kingdom in April in a bid to soothe strained ties, opposes the law because it would essentially waive the doctrine of sovereign immunity.
In February Zacarias Moussaoui, dubbed the 20th hijacker, told US lawyers that members of the Saudi royal family donated millions of dollars to al-Qaida in the 1990s. The New York Times reported last month that Saudi Foreign Minister Adel al-Jubeir told lawmakers in Washington that the kingdom would be forced to sell up to $750 billion in treasury securities and other assets in the US to avoid having them frozen by federal courts. House Speaker Paul Ryan, a Republican, has expressed hesitation about bringing the bill to the floor for a vote. The two Democratic presidential candidates, former secretary of state Hillary Clinton and Senator Bernie Sanders, have expressed support for the bill. Advertising is beginning to emerge as makers of goods try to pitch products to a rising group of consumers and a wealthy class of citizens.
From whitening toothpaste made from natural ingredients to sea-cucumber snacks that claim to fight cancer and tuberculosis, more goods are being sold in colorful ways to the growing wealthy class in the country. Ads are small and subtly placed, and do not yet compete with the colorful posters that line the streets of the capital and praise the government or ruling Workers' Party. The rudimentary advertisements are usually printed in color on A4 or A3-sized laminated paper, placed loosely on shop countertops or enlarged and stuck on shop interior walls. It's a far cry from anything resembling the kind of advertising industry depicted on the hit TV show, Mad Men.
For many years, the only notable ads in the country were related to inter-Korean projects from neighbor the Republic of Korea, during a time of better relations. Large billboards for Pyonghwa Cars, a joint venture between the two countries, have stood at several intersections in Pyongyang for years.
Advertising space at soccer games was offered to local companies for the first time last year, with boards at Asian Cup matches going for up to $40,000 for several games.
Protests were to take place across Venezuela on Wednesday against President Nicolas Maduro in the first challenge to sweeping powers he has decreed for police and soldiers under a state of emergency.
The opposition-led marches in Caracas and other cities were to demand that authorities validate a recall referendum seeking Maduro's ouster. On Tuesday he said the referendum was "not viable" and a petition it was based on with 1.8 million signatures was riddled with "fraud". The 60-day state of emergency was imposed from Monday to tackle what Maduro said were threats to security, as well as food and energy shortages. It notably suspends many constitutional protections by opening the way to expropriations and almost any action deemed necessary to maintain public order.
Individuals, companies and nongovernmental organizations in Venezuela with links to foreign groups are also to be put under scrutiny and risk having their finances frozen, according to the decree.
Maduro has accused the United States of having "imperial" designs on Venezuela, and said that a US AWACS surveillance plane had twice violated his country's airspace last week. Despite his decree, there have so far been no signs of increased military presence on the streets.
The "Unique Pink", weighing 15.38 carats and mounted on a ring, sold to an unnamed Asian private collector bidding by telephone, the auction house said. It was the star lot at the saleroom's semiannual auction in Geneva, with a pre-sale estimate of $28 million-$38 million.
Overall, the Sotheby's sale netted $175.2 million, "setting a new world record for any jewelry auction", Sotheby's said in a statement.
The director of UN humanitarian operations warned on Tuesday that 7.6 million people in conflict-torn Yemen face severe food shortages and are "one step" from famine. A quake, which occurred in the same zone where a magnitude-7.8 magnitude tremor killed hundreds of people last month, caused electricity blackout in some coastal areas.
Hillary Clinton has filed financial documents showing that in 2015 she earned more than $5 million in royalties from her book Hard Choices and about $1.5 million in speaking fees before she launched her presidential campaign. A relative said Nigerian soldiers have found the first of 219 girls kidnapped by Boko Haram from a boarding school in Chibok town more than two years ago. The Zika virus, an infectious disease linked to severe birth defects in babies, may spread into Europe as the weather gets warmer, although the risk is low, health officials said on Wednesday. Two Kiribati fishermen lost at sea for days were found on Wednesday just six minutes into a search that targeted a massive patch of ocean, rescue officials said. Harwati forces a smile as she guides visitors around a bubbling mud volcano in Indonesia, pausing as they snap selfies on the bleak wasteland she once called home. These disaster tourists are a lifeline for the single mother who lost everything when the earth beneath a paddyfield near her village opened up without warning 10 years ago, sending pungent, steaming mud bursting out, unabated. The mudflow buried villages, factories, shops, and even a major highway in the Sidoarjo district of Java island. Today Harwati and many others scrape a meager living from the curious visitors who flock to see rooftops and debris poking above the bubbling mud lake. Visitors pose next to faceless statues lying semi-submerged in the mud, a silent reminder of the human toll of this disaster. As victims prepare to mark 10 years since the start of the disaster, the mud geysers show no signs of stopping: The equivalent of 10 Olympic swimming pools of mud and water still spurt out daily.
An area roughly equivalent to 650 football fields is now buried beneath up to 40 meters of sludge.
Intrigue has surrounded the cause of the mudflow ever since it first gushed out in the densely-populated farming area on May 29, 2006. Mud volcanoes - which don't spew out lava or hot ash but instead water and clay - occur globally but Sidoarjo's is believed to be the biggest in the world.
Debate about what caused the strange phenomenon has only fueled fascination, and protracted the fight for compensation.
Independent studies alternate blame between oil and gas company PT Lapindo Brantas, which was drilling in the area at the time, and an earthquake that struck two days earlier about 260 kilometers away. Lapindo - part of a business empire controlled by Indonesia's powerful Bakrie family - was eventually ordered to compensate victims, but payments took years, triggering angry protests. The government finally intervened last year and loaned Lapindo the funds to expedite the remaining payments. Lapindo Brantas says on its website that after investigations, "it was determined that no correlation could be proven between the drilling activities and the mud eruption". The Sidoarjo Mudflow Handling Agency, a government-backed task force, said more than 3,300 households - or 95 percent of those affected - had now received payments. The 45-year-old Han had been shortlisted for the prize for fiction in translation to English along with Italian writer Elena Ferrante, Angola's Jose Eduardo Agualusa, Chinese author Yan Lianke, Turkey's Orhan Pamuk and Austrian Robert Seethaler. The novel was translated by Deborah Smith, a 28-year-old Briton who only began learning Korean when she was 21.
Han and Smith will split the $72,000 prize equally, according to the Booker Foundation, which administers the prize as well as the original Man Booker Prize for works in English and published in the United Kingdom, a prestigious award that typically leads to a surge in sales for its winner. In The Vegetarian, after struggling with gruesome recurring nightmares, Yeong-hye, a dutiful wife, rebels against societal norms, forsaking meat and stirring concern among her family that she is mentally ill. Han, who was born in the South Korean city of Gwangju, teaches creative writing at the Seoul Institute of the Arts. The Man Booker International Prize was previously awarded every two years for an author's overall contribution to global fiction, but beginning with this year's prize it is awarded annually for a single work of fiction translated into English and published in the United Kingdom. Winner of the 2016 Man Booker International Prize for fiction Han Kang poses for the media with her book The Vegetarian following the award ceremony in London, on Monday. They call themselves the Muhammasheen, which translates to "the marginalized," a dark-skinned ethnic group that for centuries has been consigned to the bottom of Yemen's social scale, faced with discrimination and racism, shunned by others. In a country where belonging to a tribe is vital to guaranteeing protection, status and livelihood, their community - which some estimates say numbers nearly 3 million people - is without a tribe and ignored by the government.


As a result, they have been hit particularly hard in Yemen's civil war that is pitting the government, backed by a Saudi-led coalition, against Shiite rebels known as Houthis and forces loyal to Yemen's ousted president. Their neighborhoods have been pounded both by coalition airstrikes and Houthi shelling, shattering their makeshift homes cobbled together from sheets of metal, cardboard and blankets. Walid Abdullah, a 20-year-old member of the Marginalized, said his home district in Taiz, al-Jahmaliya, was hit early on in the war by shelling. Now he is in Sanaa, the Yemeni capital, and he says his family is spread around multiple slums in the city. An estimated 9,000 people have been killed in the past year of fighting in Yemen, and more than 2.4 million have been driven from their homes. One advocacy group, the Yemeni Organization Against Discrimination, said it has documented more than 300 killed, including 68 children and 56 women. Other theories suggest they were African peoples who were among the first to inhabit coastal cities in Yemen. Official government statistics have put their population at around 500,000, but Marginalized activists say they number around 3 million. A family from a community referred to as the 'Muhammasheen' or 'the Marginalized', and that fled the city of Taiz because of ongoing civil war, sit inside their home in a slum area of Sanaa, Yemen. The treasures were found last month by divers Ran Feinstein and Ofer Raanan when they came across an ancient shipwreck near the port of Caesarea.
Standing next to his diving buddy, Raanan recounted the moment the pair realized they had discovered something special. The Israel Antiquities Authority sent its divers to investigate and recover the precious Roman-era cargo, which includes bronze statues, lamps, jars, animal-shaped objects, anchors and thousands of coins with images of Roman emperors Constantine and Licinius. Some of the objects date to the fourth century, while others are from the first and second centuries, said Jacob Sharvit, director of marine archaeology at the IAA.
After possibly encountering a storm, sailors dropped the anchors to try to save the ship, Sharvit said, but all their attempts failed; the ship drifted and all its cargo plunged into the water at Caesarea and remained there for 1,700 years. The port at Caesarea was commissioned by Herod the Great in the first century BC and became an important economic artery in the Mediterranean Sea until it sank for unknown reasons soon after its completion. Starting in the 1960s, Israeli archaeologists brought the sunken port back to life, along with Caesarea's aboveground wonders, including a crusader church and Roman theater. 10, in the Informatics & Communications Technology Complex on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus. With seven Institutional Review Boards and more than 4,800 approved active research studies, IU is the largest university to implement this community-developed open source software. IU earned the distinction for its pioneering eTexts initiative and recent wireless network upgrade to ensure reliable and secure access to digital materials. The twice-yearly IceBridge missions generate massive amounts of data -- all stored and archived by Indiana University's research cyberinfrastructure. Offering unmatched speed, Big Red II will be the fastest university-owned supercomputer in the nation.
ACUTA (the Association for Information Communications Technology Professionals in Higher Education) is an international nonprofit dedicated to serving the needs of higher education, including nearly 2,000 individuals at some 700 institutions.
This version includes a new Leave Management module, which lets organizations and their employees accrue, request, report and track benefit time (such as paid time off and sick days) for faculty and staff. SAGE is now the 11th publisher to partner with the university to provide digital materials to students on all IU campuses. With this addition, IU reaches an important milestone: Faculty and students now have favorable pricing for and access to digital materials from all of IU's largest publishers. Hosted by Indiana University's Pervasive Technology Institute, Cluster 2013 will take place September 23-27, 2013, at the Hilton Hotel in Indianapolis. Since 2000, the Mira Awards have recognized the movers and shakers of the state's IT industry. The third annual event showcases Adobe tools and resources that help students and instructors of all disciplines connect, discover, create and inspire. The publication's annual list features 12 movers and shakers whose reach extends beyond high performance computing (HPC) to shape future directions of technology, propelling scientific and engineering advancements.
The newly formed InCNTRE SDN User Group (ISUG) will bring together business leaders from insurance, finance, travel and healthcare who are investigating SDN technologies and the impact they may have on their networks. Today (January 14), in conjunction with its participation in the Plant and Animal Genome Conference (PAG XXI), NCGAS announced three initiatives to accelerate US public and private sector research and development in biology and biomedical research. Hosted by IU's Pervasive Technology Institute, Cluster 2013 will take place September 23-27, 2013, at the Hilton Hotel in Indianapolis.
The team performed the world's first demonstration of RDMA (Remote Direct Memory Access) over Converged Ethernet (RoCE) across a wide area network using the Lustre file system. Department of Homeland Security to address vulnerabilities arising during the process of software development.
The new system, called Data Capacitor II (DCII), is a five petabyte storage resource engineered to provide scientific researchers with high performance access to a robust storage facility. Their efforts will help provide advanced networking features for more than 200,000 of the country's community anchor institutions, including libraries, hospitals, K-12 schools, community colleges and public safety organizations.
With five petabytes of storage, Data Capacitor II will support big data applications used in computational research. The award recognizes innovative software technologies that significantly improve the agency's space exploration and maximize scientific discovery on Earth.
The NSF has selected Indiana University as a partner in a grant to create the Science Gateway Institute. The new version brings additional features and improvements to a software system that touches vital university functions every day. This honor is bestowed on IT developers whose skills have significantly contributed to the foundation's projects. President McRobbie joined the board in 2009 and succeeds University of Michigan President Mary Sue Coleman, who served as chair for the last year and as a member of the board since 2003. The Innovators Award recognizes universities that deploy extraordinary technology solutions to meet campus challenges.
The Indiana Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute (CTSI), of which IU is a founding member, recently became the first health care research institute to be named to the InCommon Federation's Research & Scholarship category. Department of Energy have renewed funding for the Open Science Grid project, providing $27 million from 2012 to 2016.
Through this grant, IU will improve the performance of oceanic computer models, which scientists use to protect millions of people living near coasts around the world.
The 25th annual award recognizes organizations around the world that exemplify operational and strategic excellence in information technology. IU's Chris Maurer and Lynn Ward received the honor along with former employee Lance Speelmon. IU's eTexts initiative enables faculty to optionally choose these digital textbooks and online exercises at reduced prices for students.
The intent is to strengthen the nation's position as a global leader in research and education for decades to come, and at the same time help control higher education costs.
Egyptian jets and naval vessels continued to search for further debris from the downed Airbus 320, he said. They spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to the press. It said the presidency "expressed its deep regret and sadness for the victims" of the flight. The country's aviation minister Sherif Fathi said the likelihood the plane was brought down by a terror attack is "higher than the possibility of a technical failure".
Egyptian officials said some of them arrived from Paris late on Thursday, among them eight relatives of the 15 French passengers on board the missing jet. Around 300,000 people had been moved to safe shelters while a further 200,000 were staying with friends or family.
There were sporadic showers in Colombo on Friday, with heavier downpours to the north of the capital that officials said would further swell the Kelani. She told Israel Radio she believes it was a "mistake" not to offer Yaalon another position and keep him in the coalition.
The emotion crept up upon us," he said over the noise of concrete-mixers and drills, marvelling at the excellent state of preservation of the vast site which covers 900 square meters. Now, an overwhelming majority of US citizens who are 40 and older want that time away from the job to be paid. Among the presidential candidates, both Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders have voiced support for paid family leave. He starred in the TV seriesi??Descendants of the Sun, which has attracted a huge audience in China. Torrents of water streamed down the hill on which the three villages of Siripura, Elangapitiya or Pallebage were located at different elevations. Officials have also warned that, with rain still falling, more landslides could occur in the area.
He and his wife had left their home to take fruit to a daughter who lived elsewhere, but at some point his wife turned back. Much of Sri Lanka has been deforested to clear land for agriculture, leaving the countryside exposed.
Two months before that, dozens of tea plantation workers were killed when mudslides buried their hillside homes. So it's very complicated for police forces to isolate and arrest them," Delage said on BFM television.
It's the main city in Maharashtra state's Marathwada region, where three districts - Beed, Latur and Osmanabad - have been devastated by two consecutive droughts. Crops have failed, cattle are wasting away and long, scorching walks in search of drinking water have resulted in dozens of deaths. Sitting with her two young children, she stares silently as older female relative explained her husband's death to visiting journalists. The landlocked area has historically been drought-prone, but decades of environmental degradation and the lack of a water management plan have pushed the region to the brink.
The city of Miraj, about 340 kilometers west of Latur, was chosen as the place to source water for the thirsty Marathwada region. According to local legend, the well never runs dry, but for the purpose of filling the wagons that transport water to Latur, kilometers of plastic pipes have been laid out from the Krishna River. The containers, which once carried petroleum products or vegetable oil, were chemically treated and steam-cleaned before being freshly painted for their new cargo at a railway yard in the western state of Rajasthan. You leave the session feeling serene and calm," the 35-year-old said after sparring with Adams Soulaimana, a hunk of a guy standing 1.93 meters tall and weighing 120 kilos, a professional dancer by profession.
It requires strategy (and) adaptability, which are important qualities in professional life," said Quidu, a researcher in sports sociology.
If owners failed to comply, the government would carry out the demolition and bill them, he added. A new agency set up to prevent further collapses shows the scale of the problem of bad construction, urging residents not to build on roads, power cables, pipelines and waterways.
Kenyan authorities announced plans to demolish hundreds of buildings that are in bad shape or poorly constructed. The memos followed meetings between Colombian diplomats and officials from the Office of the US Trade Representative and a Republican staffer on the Senate Finance Committee whose chairman, Senator Orrin Hatch of Utah, has close ties to the pharmaceutical industry. He noted Colombia's healthcare system guarantees patients' access to all approved drugs and the budget is straining after years of price rises.
That is less than half the current regulated price but still well above what generic versions cost before they were banned when, after a decade of litigation, a Colombian court in 2012 awarded Novartis an exclusive patent on one of two forms of the drug. He also proposed raising the amount that marijuana users can legally carry to 28 grams from 5 grams. Pena Nieto has not said where consumers would be able to obtain the marijuana they would be allowed to carry. One allegation each was made in the UN peacekeeping missions in South Sudan, Cote d'Ivoire, Mali and the disputed Abeyi border region between Sudan and South Sudan as well as in the UN political missions in Libya and overseeing the Middle East peace process. There have been similar allegations against the French force known as Sangaris, which operates independently in Central African Republic. The US-based advocacy group AIDS-Free World that first reported the allegations in Kemo prefecture said UN investigators had documented 41 additional cases by April 4. They had said they might sell up to $750 billion in US securities and other assets in retaliation if it became law. And the president of the United States continues to harbor serious concerns that this legislation would make the United States vulnerable in other court systems around the world," White House spokesman Josh Earnest said. But no official Saudi complicity in the al-Qaida attacks has been proven, and the kingdom has never been formally implicated. A Caracas march last week, before the emergency decree, was halted in its tracks by riot police firing tear gas. It's the highest price ever paid for a fancy vivid pink diamond," David Bennett, worldwide chairman of Sotheby's international jewelry division, told reporters. John Ging said there has been "a shocking fall off" in support over the last few months for the millions of Yemenis who need food, clean water and basic healthcare. The 11-page document shows that most of her personal wealth is held in a fund and a separate JP Morgan Custody Account, both valued at $5 million to $25 million. YaKubu Nkeki said his niece Amina Ali Nkeki was found wandering in the forest close to the border with Cameroon on Tuesday. In its first assessment of the threat Zika poses to the region, the World Health Organization said the overall risk was small to moderate.
Search coordinator Mike Roberts described it as a "fantastic" outcome after a military plane located the men 480 kilometers from Nauru, the nearest land, five days after they went missing. Thirteen people died when an underground gas pipeline in the disaster zone exploded, while thousands were left homeless. There are two main theories on what triggered it - drilling for natural resources or an earthquake.
The area was declared a disaster zone and sealed off, with warning signs dotting the perimeter. Busloads of tourists arrive at weekends, and DVDs dramatizing the disaster are hugely popular souvenirs. I really wanted to see how big the mud was, because I had heard many houses were buried," said Andri, a tourist from Surabaya.
They live in shantytowns on the outskirts of cities, are often refused schooling and work menial jobs like shoe-shining or street cleaning or turn to begging.
Some tell of fleeing from strikes by one side, only to be hit again by another of the many factions and combatants in the conflict. We have nothing," Houssna Mohammed said, choking back tears as she stood at the charred remains of her shack in a slum in the western city of Taiz. The death toll among the Marginalized is difficult to verify because few pay attention to them. Popular tradition has it that they are the descendants of Ethiopian soldiers who invaded Yemen in the 6th Century. He said they left the first sculpture on the seabed when they found it, but then when they discovered a second, they realized it was something special and brought it to the surface. Some scientists believe it is located on a geological fault line; other theories point to a tsunami.
Schopf officially joined the Office of the Vice President for Information Technology and CIO on Aug. Representatives from Courseload and IU accepted the award at the IMS Global Learning Impact 2013 conference.
Keyes, professor of applied mathematics and computational science at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia, will be the keynote speaker. The event will let SDN Lab members test the interoperability of their products with Big Switch Networks' commercial controller, the Big Network Controller.
The Department of Homeland Security awarded a $23.6 million grant to the Morgridge Institute for Research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison to create the Software Assurance Marketplace, which, over the next five years, will work closely with developers of new software analysis technology and the open source community to advance the security of software. DCII will be used for a range of applications, including management of massive research data sets, high-scale data analysis, genomic sequencing and computational visualization. Named Big Red II, the next-generation Cray XK supercomputer will be capable of one thousand trillion floating-point operations per second, or one petaFLOPS.
The university will carry out the pilot trials during a two-year evaluation period to assess the technologies that can best support the changing needs of students and faculty.
Indiana University will receive $3.82 million of the award to continue running OSG's Operations Center, highlighting IU's noted expertise in grid computing and ability to deliver a reliable, secure, easy-to-use environment. Over three decades, he has at times been Netanyahu's closest ally and at other times a fierce rival.
Over the last few decades, locals have extracted groundwater relentlessly, severely depleting the water table. Located in the basin of the Krishna River, Miraj is one of the few cities in the region that has escaped the drought. The water that gushes into the well is then pumped out through another grid of underground pipes to the rail yard at Miraj. In 2009, the government declared a public health emergency after spending on sophisticated drugs had risen tenfold in just a few years. The United Nations appealed for $1.8 billion to help more than 13 million Yemenis this year was just 16 percent funded, he said.
The former quake on April 16 killed at least 660 people and injured more than 4,000 others. It is highest in areas where Aedes mosquitoes thrive, in particular on the island of Madeira and the northeastern coast of the Black Sea. She said her home was burned down in March when a mortar hit her neighbor and the fire was blown to her shack. Thomas Sterling, professor of informatics and computing at Indiana University and executive associate director of IU's Center for Research in Extreme Scale Technologies, will deliver the closing address. Next.IU launched in fall 2012 with exploratory studies of Instructure's Canvas learning management system (LMS) and CourseNetworking's social media-based learning environment. Equipment from SDN switch vendors Dell, Extreme Networks, HP, IBM and NEC as well as SDN testing manufacturers Ixia and Spirent will be tested at the event.
Williams, IU's first director of international networking, who is retiring after a 30-year career at the university.



Positive changes in my life youtube
Esther jerry hicks ask and it is given quote



Comments to «What makes a good team leader presentation»

  1. Must day by day reside as men and women whose programs such as OSU's.
  2. The word evil??I mean in the sense that.