preload

25.07.2014
I’ll save you from the gorey details, but lets just say it took nearly 12 months, countless hours and dozens of repeated applications! So without further ado, I present to you a master guide to changing your name after marriage in British Columbia.
As of 2013, you need to have your Health Care updated prior to applying for a new drivers license. In addition, for the sake of both your medical records and your medical services plan, it’s essential that you update your care card to match your other ID. As your drivers license is typically your primary piece of ID, I suggest updating it first or as soon as you recieve your marriage certificate.
Changing your passport to your married name can be one of the more challenging steps in this process, simply because the route you take depends on multiple factors. You will more than likely need to apply for a passport as if it were your first time, using the General Adult Passport Application. Keep in mind there are multiple circumstances that can sway whether or not you must apply in person at a government agent office or the official lower mainland passport offices. It’s important that you inform CRA of your change of name for taxation purposes, as well as for your medical records, as the health care division of British Columbia is billed and managed by Revenue Canada. Unfortunately, there’s no easy 1,2,3 plan for changing over your bank accounts, credit cards and payroll to reflect your new married name. KME advice: As bills come due, pay day approaches and you finally have a need to run inside the bank, take the time to update your records then.
I’d bet my last penny that most newlyweds will get to changing over the fun stuff before getting to the official ones. So there you have it, lovelies: A no non-sense, complete guide to changing to your married name in British Columbia, Canada.
As far as my personal experience and research has served me, you only need one copy when applying in person, as they do not keep it. When you apply for your marriage certificate the FIRST time, the certificate you receive in return is an official marriage certificate document. For those who are employees, speak to your supervisor or HR person to be sure that Group Insurance packages are updated as well as Pensions or Group RRSP plans as well. THANK YOU SO MUCH for this article- I have been married for almost 3 years, have one baby and another one on the way with my husband, but the whole process of changing my last name has been so daunting, not knowing where to start, which things need to be changed first so that other ones can be changed etc etc.
Thanks to this site, I had my name officially changed less than 2 months after getting married. Some of the most common questions I was asked as a newlywed were, "Does it feel any different to be married?" "Have you got used to calling him 'husband' yet?" and, of course, "So are you taking his last name?" When I answered in the negative (for all three questions, actually), the latter query was followed up with further questions. I decided at the ripe old age of 15, almost 10 years before I met the man who would become my husband, that I would not change my name for marriage. As I grew older, learning more about gender politics and the inequalities that women still face in society cemented that teenage decision to keep my name. To put it bluntly -- as I sometimes do when people really grill me about my decision -- it's not 1950 and I'm not cattle that needs to be branded with my owner's name. If you are debating whether to change your surname for marriage, don't listen to the people who question your decision -- don't even listen to this article -- but take time to ponder for yourself your thoughts on name and identity, and what's important to you.
You shall not make any cuttings in your flesh for the dead, nor tattoo any marks on you: I am theLord. In recent years, as we move away from biblical teaching in our society, tattooing has become popular. This is understandable as we have the desire to tattoo, we in turn find ways to justify what we desire. If so, please join other believers who receive exclusive weekly insights into biblical living, and get a FREE COPY of my eBook, 5 Biblical Secrets to Healthy Weight! He lives in Magdalena, NM were he serves as pastor of First Baptist Church, and works at the dental office of Duane H.
For decades, Pang Xiaowei has been shooting black-and-white portraits for thousands of celebrities in China. The 60-year-old photographer has captured the likenesses of all the Olympic gold medal holders in China up to 2012 and more than 1,000 celebrities, from singers to film-industry figures, including famed directors, performers and producers.
He started to snap celebrities in the film industry in 2002 to honor the 100th anniversary of China's film industry.
The difficulty of photographing an actor or actress is that they don't know how to be themselves in front of a camera when they don't have to play a role, says Pang. Pang understands it well because he had been a theater actor for 10 years before taking up photography at age 30.
After the film celebrity series, Pang was touched by Beijing's excitement to hold the Olympic Games in 2008, and he began his Chinese Olympic champion series, which included 186 Chinese gold medal winners. That seemed like an impossible task, because many champions then lived in various countries and out of the public eye. For his latest show, which just closed on Tuesday at the National Art Museum, he aimed his lens at craftsmen, local residents and even the boys of a visiting chorus from Saxony in Germany, a cultural project initiated by A. Fan Di'an, head of the Central Academy of Fine Arts, says Pang's photos represent a process of using film to reveal a person's inner self.
Pang is now working on a Peking Opera series, and for the first time in his life, he will create portraits of the well-known performers in color - but he will also produce a black-and-white edition of the series. He adds that Spanish tenor Placido Domingo loved the Peking Opera photos Pang gave him as a gift when the two met in Beijing last year.
Her country-and-western covers album Detour, which was out on Friday, brings another unexpected twist to a career that has included music, theater, television, movies and wrestling. A musical chameleon, she's won two Grammys, an Emmy and a Tony, but despite all the success, she says she's not as savvy at the art of business. Her meandering path took her from Broadway where she wrote music for Kinky Boots, which won six Tony Awards, to Music City where the pink-haired 62-year-old singer recorded her latest album with guest vocals from Willie Nelson, Vince Gill, Alison Krauss and Emmylou Harris.
Together with producer Tony Brown, she worked with some of the city's best session musicians to craft a live sound that wasn't polished to perfection.
The songs are from a different era of country music, as far back as the '40s, when country was heavily influenced by early rock 'n' roll and blues, or as Lauper says her record label head Seymour Stein put it, "before Elvis kicked the door down". She covers songs made famous by Patsy Cline, Loretta Lynn, Wanda Jackson, George Jones, Dolly Parton and Marty Robbins. At four hours long (not counting two intermissions), the play does not contain much dramatic conflict. The hero of the play, Professor Josef Schuster, jumped to his death shortly before the curtain rose. Heroes' Square is one of the foreign productions presented during the Tianjin theater festival. As an alter ego of the playwright Thomas Bernhard, Josef vents his anger and frustration onto Vienna, or the world at large. When his brother, Robert Schuster, rants on about the state of affairs of the city, they obviously share political inclinations, but we are told Robert is much nicer in disposition. It may be an irony that the more the brothers, or the playwright, take on Vienna as the hotbed of evil, the more sympathy audience members in the Tianjin Grand Theater showed for the Austrian capital. As for the possible relevance for the audience, I don't think Bernhard or director Krystian Lupa had China in mind when they first broached the topic. The pessimistic streak that underpins his worldview also runs through his relationships with those closest to him, not unlike Hamlet's with Ophelia. The crowd noise from the titular square acts as the oppression of the populace, who are deemed stupid and blind. Heroes' Square is one of many imported theatrical productions the audacious Tianjin festival is presenting this season. Others include Richard III directed by Thomas Ostermeier and (A) pollonia by Nowy Teatr of Poland. Situated on a mountain top and approachable only after more than an hour's drive along zigzagging mountain roads from the nearest town, Muyang village is a favorite destination for visitors. A natural environment, refreshing air, picturesque mountain views and the clear water of its famous Muyang Brook draw people to experience life in this village, which lies near Sandouping town, in Yichang in Central China's Hubei province. Top: A local woman in red rides a covered boat on Longjing Brook in Sandouping town, known for the Three Gorges Dam project and the Tribe of the Three Gorges.
The village is home to more than 2,000 people, who live in settlements in the mountainous area, which varies in altitude from 300 to 850 meters.
The villagers traditionally depended on farming and silkworm breeding for their livelihoods, according to Liu Ping, the Party secretary of the village.
Ai Shihua, 83, a villager who has spent his entire life in the village, says he has seen big changes in the lives of the villagers in the past decade thanks to tourism. Now living with his son in a home that is equipped with modern appliances like a TV and a refrigerator, Ai helps the family run a farmhouse restaurant that they started in 2009. During the peak season, which runs from May to October, the family can earn up to 800 yuan a day just by providing food. Ai's son is now building a better-equipped farmhouse inn so they can expand their business to cover both dining and accommodation. Even his grandson is trying to promote the family's business using WeChat, a popular app in China. The family owns less than 0.3 hectare of land, on which they grow corn, potatoes or rapeseed. As more visitors come to their village, products such as rapeseed oil have become popular with tourists and bring them income.
Ai adds that earlier the family used to depend solely on farming and earn about 10,000 yuan per year before they turned to tourism. Meanwhile, according to Liu, many families are now operating farmhouse restaurants, inns and parking lots in the village. He adds that the village also plans to add a mulberry plantation of 67 hectares for fruit picking to its current tourist assets.
Separately, the village will introduce more farm crops that can be used to make products which can be sold to tourists.
Rural tourism has now become a critical part of the local tourist industry and will be the main focus of the town's tourism promotion in the future, says Wang Hua, the head of the town's government.
In 2015, the town's scenic areas and rural tourist destinations welcomed more than 4.73 million people, bringing in 4 billion yuan of consolidated revenue for a town that has a population of 35,000. In recent years, the local tourism industry has also put a large number of local farmers on the road to a better life, she says.
In 2015, the Tribe of the Three Gorges, an area with the highest ranking under China's tourist-attraction rating system - 5A - developed from a previously poverty-stricken village, drew 2.8 million visitors, contributing about 12 million yuan of taxes to the local government. To encourage rural tourism, the local government also offers training to poor families who are willing to enter the tourism trade. The families are then provided with a "green pass", which simplifies the approval process and provides them with easier access to loans. In recent years, the government has also tried to further integrate its well-known tourist spots, such as the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze River and Tribe of the Three Gorges, with its rural tourist destinations nearby by developing more tourist routes. Thanks to the Three Gorges Dam, Sandouping receives about 350,000 Chinese and overseas visitors annually. Situated along the midsection of the Yangtze River, the town boasts two areas with the highest grade under China's tourist attraction rating system.
The two areas with the 5A ratings are the Three Gorges Dam, the largest water project in the world, and the Tribe of the Three Gorges area, a picturesque landscape corridor. Thanks to its unique location, the town is an important stop along the Three Gorges section of the river. The town's only main street extends along the Yangtze, and we stayed in a guesthouse on the street, which offered a nice view of the river. In contrast to the turbid water in the lower reaches of the Yangtze, the section here is clear and quiet. After breakfast, we set out for the Tribe of the Three Gorges area, which turned out to be a good place to appreciate the quiet valley and local culture. Visitors typically take a ferry boat from the opposite bank of the Yangtze River to the valley entrance, which is connected to the river.
Trackers toiling along the river while singing work songs were a common sight in the region in the old days. On the brook, a covered boat moves slowly amid soft ripples with a young girl in a striking red traditional costume standing on it holding an umbrella.
For a moment, we feel as if we are in a painting, until we are awakened by a folk song that suddenly starts to resonate in the valley. We follow the sound and the scenes change as we walk along: A fisherman mends his net on a boat, girls in traditional blue outfits wash clothes along the edge of the brook in front of their wooden houses on stilts, and young couples stand on the mossy stone bridge in the village. Performances though they are, they create an engaging atmosphere by naturally melting into the peaceful environment. Then we hear a noise coming from a crowd of tourists amid the sound of a gong in front of large wooden building. The performers, most of whom are local villagers, interact with the tourists and invite one of them to act the groom. The sightseeing route leads all the way to the mountain top, where the villagers still reside. The giant dam rises 185 meters, creating a reservoir that spans more than 600 kilometers in the middle of Yangtze River. Local people tell us that the best way to enjoy a panoramic view of the dam and the reservoir is from the mountain nearby.
They say that if you are lucky to see water being released from the dam you can feel the ground shaking. Jia Pingwa's new novel, Ji Hua, tells the story of a woman who is freed after three years after being kidnapped. The author, who won the Mao Dun Literature Prize, China's top literary award, for his earlier novel Qin Qiang (Qinqiang Opera), has named his latest book after an imaginary flower, which has later found to be the Chinese caterpillar fungus. Ji Hua is the tale of Hu Die, a girl from a poor rural family who accompanies her single mother to the city. Jia is among China's most influential contemporary writers, and his books have been translated into many languages, including English, French, German, Russian, Japanese and Korean. Ji Hua was written based on a real-life story that Jia had heard from a resident of Xi'an, in Northwest China's Shaanxi province, a decade ago. Jia, who also comes from a rural family, then began to focus on population thinning in rural areas of China.
Several years ago, in many remote villages in Shaanxi, the number of residents fell so much that the villages were merged into one. Many women who go to the cities with their husbands either divorce or abandon them, fearing the prospect of returning to the poor villages. The situation reminded Jia of the story about the abducted girl, and resulted in the new novel of around 200 pages - his shortest - using a concept he borrowed from Chinese ink painting, an art form in which he also excels. Instead of depicting pure good and evil, his book creates an organic image of a remote village in his home province, where challenging living conditions present many complexities.
Chinese author Liang Hong, who is known for her works about the Chinese countryside, says for her, Ji Hua isn't about an abducted woman, but more about how to communicate with the land. According to Chen Xiaoming, a professor of Chinese literature at Peking University, Jia's writing is both about wronged women of rural China and the living conditions there. The author writes about the villages that have been deserted for the cities - villages with history, beauty and vitality. The novel is a mix of realism, magical realism and many other avant-garde writing techniques. Since the novel was first published, it has set a record as a contemporary literary work, with about 2 million copies sold in China, according to People's Literature Publishing House. In 2010, the novel was adapted into a film of the same name directed by Wang Quan'an and starring Zhang Fengyi, Zhang Yuqi and Duan Yihong.
Feng Jicai, another highly accomplished writer, says in a message of condolence: "Chen scaled the highest peak of Chinese contemporary literature.
Chang Zhenjia, 72, an editor at People's Literature Publishing House for more than 30 years, read the first edition of White Deer Plain and published the first review of the novel. Karl Schlecht, the 83-year-old sponsor of the China Center at Germany's Tubingen University.
Wide-eyed students flocked around Karl Schlecht as he prepared to tuck into spring rolls and steamed buns after speaking at the opening of Tubingen University's China Center in Germany. The food went untouched until the 83-year-old had finished chatting and posing for pictures with his wellwishers.
Sporting a bright-red tie, white shirt and double-breasted navy-blue suit, and wearing thin-rimmed glasses, he looked and sounded more like the students' favorite grandpa than a benefactor who once ruled a construction machinery empire that helped build the world's tallest skyscrapers. Born in a small Swabian town near Stuttgart in 1932, Schlecht learned to mix and lay mortar and concrete from his father, a master plasterer. While studying at the Technical University of Stuttgart in the late 1950s, the young Schlecht answered his father by designing an automated mortar machine, which he assembled in his garage. Before graduating college, Schlecht started a company that would help change the face of civil engineering, riding on the crest of Europe's post-war construction boom. In 2012, Schlecht astonished the world by selling the empire he had built single-handedly to a Chinese rival, Sany Heavy Industries, for a reported 560 million euros ($643 million).
Schlecht insists it was the right deal, and all the proceeds went to his charitable foundation.
In addition to his charitable causes, Schlecht now serves as an adviser to Sany's chairman, once China's richest man.
One of the first tips the German offered to Putzmeister's new owner came from an unexpected source: Confucius. According to the German businessman, Confucius underlines essential elements of true entrepreneurship: trust, honesty, tolerance, love and responsibility.
After the takeover, Schlecht persuaded Liang to become a joint patron of the World Ethics Institute at Peking University.
He now devotes most of his time to his charitable foundation, KSG, which has a long list of projects, including clean energy research and good leadership. Schlecht says the China Center at Tubingen, which is 30 minutes' drive from where he assembled his first mortar machine, was founded with an ideal: to make students aware of each other's history and of the forces that propelled China to become the world's second-largest economy within a generation. A voracious reader, he goes to bed to re-read Erich Fromm's The Art of Love or maybe a John Rockefeller biography.
The 29-year-old, who moved to the UK at age 15 to pursue his snooker dream, narrowly missed out on unseating Mark Selby from his world No 1 spot in a gripping final of the World Championship at Sheffield's Crucible Theatre. It was another landmark in a career in which Ding has served as China's standard-bearer in a sport that has undergone a rapid growth of interest and participation. Jason Ferguson, chairman of the World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association, says snooker was already huge in China. In addition to Ding, players such as Zhou Yuelong, Yan Bingtao and Zhao Xintong are likely to become a lot more familiar over the next decade, as will others competing in a sport that attracts 100 million TV viewers at home. During this year's final it was announced that the World Snooker Championship will stay in Sheffield until at least 2027. Ding, whose record at the World Championship was poor before this year, says: "Five years ago I reached the semifinals, and this year I made it one step further. Seven-time world champion Stephen Hendry applauded Ding, saying he is at a different level from most others. Nowhere else in the world has one single humble bean given rise to such a large range of different foods, from juices, pickles, preserves, seasonings, custard to cakes of different textures, and finally, fertilizer. According to legend, it was indeed alchemy that led to the discovery of bean curd, more commonly known as tofu.
Throughout Chinese history, those who ruled often were afraid of death, losing all they had gathered, or of having to leave all that power and glory.
In their attempts, they drew water from the region's natural springs and cooked ground up soybeans to create a base for that elusive pill. That was more than 2,000 years ago, and in the interim, bean curd has become one of the most important ingredients China has contributed to the world. As the Chinese ventured out, they brought the culture of bean curd with them, so much so that it took on a life of its own, adapting to the cuisines of various countries from Japan and Korea in the north to the Malay and Indonesian archipelagos to the south.
Various forms of bean curd and its derivatives, too, have become the backbone of vegetarian cuisine in the global meatless movement. Soybean products are a good source of vegetable protein, and after being processed, most no longer have that embarrassing side effect that made the bean itself so unpopular - flatulence. One of the best breakfasts you can have in China is a piping hot bowl of soft bean curd, called doufunao in the north and doufuhua in the south. The northerners prefer a savory version, dousing their soft bean curd with a brown sauce often laced with strips of mushrooms and a few dried daylily buds. No one cooks tofu better than the chefs who specialize in Huainan cuisine, right from the region where it was first invented. Here, tender blocks of tofu challenge the knife skills of chefs who float strands as thin as hair in rich chicken stock. Soft blocks of tofu are also steamed to retain their original bean flavor, and may be drizzled with soy sauce or oyster sauce and garnished with a sprinkle of chopped spring onions.


Cubes of a harder version may be deep-fried into puffs and then stuffed with a fish paste to create a dish popular with the Hakka community - niangdoufu. Or the curds may be aged and fermented to create that notorious snack that has the uninitiated holding their noses. In the Jiangsu-Zhejiang region, stinky tofu is legendary, having made it into literary classics such as native son Lu Xun's works. Across the Straits, Taiwan's famous night markets must have at least one or two stinky tofu stalls. Back in my Yunnan, slightly fermented tofu is sold at breakfast stalls, sprinkled with chopped peanuts, chili sauce and cilantro.
Tender tofu and soft fish paste in custard translate to a dish suitable for both grandparents and grandchildren. This is a dish that contrasts the simple texture of the silken tofu with the stronger flavors of the spicy mince. Spread mince and sauce mix evenly over block of tofu and steam for 15 minutes on high heat. They are white, chubby and have sprigs on their heads - and Chinese social media can't get enough of them. Roughly half the population has conveyed some kind of emotion with a Budding Pop emoji on WeChat, the instant-messaging app, making them one of the most popular in the world.
Many of them hope this fame will lead to financial rewards, too, as it means they can potentially produce books for fans to buy as well as sell the rights for their characters to companies for marketing purposes. He says the way his team works is similar to the Japanese cartoon industry: artists design an original image and others contribute ideas to update the series. Zhong Wei in the northeast city of Shenyang has been drawing cartoons since 2014 and has published two picture books. Zhong has released three collections of the emoji via the instant-messaging app since August last year. China's emoji craze is rooted in Japan's kawaii (cute) and otaku (outsider) movements, he explains. Shi Donglin, 23, creator of the Freezing Gal emoji, believes the ultra-short animations can also help bring light relief at tense or embarrassing moments.
Freezing Gal, which has dark skin and a ponytail, is based on her experiences in college and is popular among students. Unlike traditional cartoonists, who generally created characters before selling stories to magazines or publishing houses, Shi launched her career via social media.
She says she will continue to make emojis and has now started on a series of picture books featuring Freezing Gal. Cashing in while a character is hot is important, according to Xu Han, the artist behind Ali the red fox, another popular character.
Wang at 12 Buildings agrees that it is hard to guarantee longevity, but he believes the internet provides opportunities for budding Chinese illustrators to work with major brands that would previously have opted for foreign talent. Budding Pop is now featured in promotions by Procter & Gamble, the multinational consumer goods company, while smartphone maker Xiaomi is using Freezing Gal to reach new buyers. Xu is a good model for any modern Chinese illustrator: first came the character, then picture books and emojis, and then online shops selling merchandise.
Ali originally appeared online and in magazines in 2006, but only after making his debut on instant-messaging app WeChat last year did the character gain mass appeal. The fourth installment, Carrousel Garden, published in March, sees Ali encounter characters from Western fairy tales, such as the Little Prince, Pinocchio and the Ugly Duckling. Even if Chinese artists can gain exposure through the internet and social media, he says building a brand is not easy.
During his six years in the job, he says there has been a noticeable increase in men in kindergarten classrooms, but there are still hurdles to attracting more. Chen Yilang and a student strike a kung fu pose at the China Welfare Institute Kindergarten in Shanghai.
So are education officials, who have moved to act in recent years in the fear that Chinese schools are producing effeminate boys.
Despite relaxing the college admission requirements for men seeking to study preschool education, as well as offering scholarships that come with a guarantee of full-time employment, the number of men entering the field has remained low.
In Shanghai, for example, just 200 of the more than 53,000 teachers at 2,000 kindergartens were men in 2014, according to the city's education commission.
Industry insiders say the biggest hurdles are the general perception that teaching preschool is for women and the relatively low salaries that are offered to educators. Chen Yilang, who works at the same kindergarten as Gao, says most people in his job earn about 55,000 yuan ($8,400; 7,500 euros) a year, which is roughly 10,000 yuan lower than the city average in 2014. Education experts believe the gender imbalance at preschools could have a serious social impact, as this stage of education can be critical to the forming of a young person's character.
Feng Wei, the principal of the China Welfare Institute Kindergarten, argues that the shortage of male teachers has led to an increase in boys who are shy and timid.
The typical family environment in China has also played a role, she says, as mothers are expected to raise the children while fathers bring home the bacon. To address the problem, authorities need to focus on promoting respect, says Shi Bin, director of the Fundamental Education Development Center at Shanghai Normal University. Parents are noticing, too, and some are already taking action to "toughen up" their sons by enrolling them in team sports and activities. China Welfare Institute Kindergarten has been recruiting male teachers since the late 1990s. The distinct teaching methods employed by the male and female teachers "are a perfect complement" and help to provide children with a holistic learning experience, according to Feng. Gao, for example, says he tries to reinforce "masculine qualities" through physical activities such as making students climb orange trees to pick the fruit. Wang Jiaming, another male teacher at the school, agrees that it is important to have a mix of male and female educators involved in a child's education.
Chen adds that male teachers prefer to let children obtain physical knowledge and abilities through frequent sporting activities. Strange as it may seem, carving fruit pits - or drupes, pips, seeds, and nuts if you prefer - goes back centuries. Crafting peach and apricot pits walnut shells, and even olive seeds into Buddha figurines, jewelry and landscapes has been practiced at least since the Spring and Autumn Period (770-476 BC).
Yun's most famous pieces express a sense of active realism, often are praised for the sense of life he gives to his subjects, which sometimes are celebrities.
Located in the heart of the city and well known for its labyrinth of alleys, Tianzifang was built where abandoned factories from the 1940s and historical Shikumen residential buildings from the 1920s once stood. Yu Hai, a professor of sociology at Fudan University who has studied Tianzifang since its inception nearly 20 years ago, says it is a shame that the true charm of the area has been lost in the modernization process. This used to be a place where people can savor the essence of old Shanghai, and one that was slated to become a community for people from the creative industries.
Zheng Rongfa, the former administrative head of the Dapuqiao area which Taikang Road is under, recalls how Tianzifang used to be a vibrant place filled with the sounds and smells coming from the homes of Shanghainese families. In 1998, Zheng kicked off the project to turn the area into a hub for the cultural industry.
In 1999, Chen Yifei, a world-renowned Chinese painter, and several other artists set up studios in the old factories on Lane 210 along Taikang Road, creating a cluster of more than 200 culture and art venues. One year later, the sub-district government leased the remaining spaces to a sole proprietor named Wu Meisheng. Fortunately, thanks to the intervention of Zheng and a group of his supporters, Tianzifang emerged unscathed. According to statistics provided by Yu, 100 million square meters of old buildings in Shanghai were torn down between the early 1990s and 2008 to make way for modern ones. However, the Shanghai government has also been striving to preserve traditional architecture, turning many old estates into zones for creative industries.
According to statistics from the municipal government, there were 87 zones hosting creative industries and 52 parks for cultural industries at the end of 2013.
Following this incident, Zheng realized that the residents from neighboring lanes needed to band together to help expand the size of Tianzifang in order to boost the significance of the area.
However, he says that he had done so only because the 3,500 yuan ($540) he charged for rent would go a long way in helping with his living expenses - he was only getting 300 yuan every month from his retirement pension.
In the past decade, more than 500 households have followed in Zhou's footsteps to convert their houses to non-residential units. While the interiors of many of the buildings have since been renovated and given a new coat of paint, the old brick facades from which Tianzifang gets its charm, are still very much intact. Laundry would hang from balconies as new-age music spilled through windows of boutique shops on the ground floor. In 2008, the government took over Tianzifang and shifted the focus from developing the place into an art and culture hub to commercialization, security and property management.
As one of the first shop owners to arrive on Lane 274 in 2007, Yan Hongliang, who sells ceramic art designed and produced in Jingdezhen, Jiangxi province, has witnessed the tremendous changes that have taken place since. Having already struggled to break even in the first few years of his business, the exorbitant rent now has made doing business in Tianzifang unrealistic. Unsurprisingly, Yu's survey reveals that many shop owners have cited the rising rent - it has increased at least ten-fold in 20 years - as the primary reason for relocating. Fabienne Wallenwein, a German PhD student who is enrolled in a one-year exchange program at Fudan University, shares the same sentiment.
In the meantime, Zheng Rongfa, the former administrative head, says he can only hope that the government thinks the same way about the future direction of Tianzifang's development.
They range from cotton drawers worn by the mother of Queen Victoria (the V&A museum is named for the 19th-century monarch and her husband), to a Swarovski crystal-studded bra and thong.
But there are men's unmentionables, too, including 18th-century shirts, which were considered underwear because they were worn next to the skin - only the collars and cuffs could decently be shown. Curators of the show have emphasized the contribution of female designers and innovators such as Roxey Ann Caplin, whose "health corset" - designed to shape the body without crushing the internal organs - won a medal at the Great Exhibition of 1851.
Waist-constricting corsets run through the exhibition, in versions that range from functional to fetishistic.
Edwina Ehrman, the exhibition's curator, says Lycra was "a fabulous breakthrough" - and a reminder that the evolution of underwear is a story of technology as well as creativity.
The exhibition reveals that the line between underwear and outerwear has long been blurred. Recent years have seen the line blur even further, as tracksuits, onesies and other loungewear moved from the living room onto the streets. But French lingerie designer Fifi Chachnil - whose signature Babyloo playsuit is on display in the exhibition - thinks we will always want to show off our skivvies. A full scale replica of Dumont's legendary airplane called "14 Bis" sits outside the museum, which is the centerpiece of a revamping of the Rio port area ahead of the Olympic Games starting in 100 days. The Flying Poet is a big exhibit, the first of its kind dedicated to a man who while weighing a mere 50 kilograms was a giant of aviation. Although perhaps less well known than the Wright brothers in the United States, Dumont is celebrated in Brazil as no less than the true first pilot. Although this was three years after the Wright brothers' historic flight in North Carolina, his fans argue that only his exploit met the definition of a certified, independently powered flight. It's a polemic rich with nationalism, but what's sure is that Dumont, who has Rio's domestic airport named after him, remains a fascinating figure.
The Franco-Brazilian Dumont, who lived from 1873 to 1932, had a reputation for eccentricity and imagination. Before his feat in the "14 Bis" he was already famed for flights in balloons and dirigibles, including one he used to moor outside his house in Paris and used to fly to join friends across town. He can also claim to having been one of the first to wear a wrist watch, having asked his friend - none other than the even more famous Louis Cartier - to make him something more practical for telling the time in the air than the traditional pocket watch.
The pop-up drone cafe will be serving up all weekend as part of celebrations for the "Dream and Dare" festival marking the 60th anniversary of the Eindhoven University of Technology.
The 20 students behind the project, who spent nine months developing and building the autonomous drone, aim to show how such small inside craft could become an essential part of modern daily life.
The drone, nicknamed Blue Jay, which resembles a small white flying saucer with a luminescent strip for eyes, flies to a table and hovers as it takes a client's order, who points to the list to signal what they would like. The drinks are picked up and carried by a set of pinchers underneath the drone, in a bid to show that these aerial machines could be used to carry out delicate missions such as delivering medicines or even helping to track down burglars.
Each drone has cost about 2,000 euros ($2,293) to build, in a project funded by the university which the students say aims "to give a glimpse of the future". Thanks to sensors and a long battery life they can fly inside buildings and navigate crowded interiors, unlike other drones, which rely on a GPS system.
They believe the drone's applications could be endless: as extinguishers to put out fires, alarm systems to warn of intruders or mini-servants which would respond to commands such as "fetch me an apple". There seems to be a bit of a mystery surrounding the birth and youth of our ancestor, Albert Raymond Morton. The earliest events that any of his family knew of him was that, when a young man, he worked as a steamfitter on the Trans-Canadian Railroad.
But, as to his birth, youth and parents, there are some real gaps in what is definitely knowna€”these were not topics of discussion in his home, and it simply did not occur to anyone to quiz him about his early life.
Wea€™ll keep these vague impressions in mind as they may generate some leads in our search, but we must also guard against the assumption that they are all correct. So, with the little that we know of him, we have started to collect, and sort out, the few documents we have been able to find regarding his origin. At the time of his birth (in the 1880a€™s) states were not yet keeping actual birth certificates. Again, remember that this information was provided from Raya€™s understanding of what happened when he was an infant, and given to the state many years later.
Ira Homer Morton (Alberta€™s father) is buried there, next to Iraa€™s sister, Irene Morton Crankshaw. The next document that we will discuss is his application for a Social Security account number [2]. Just below this document, we will attach another, which Albert completed just a few months later, in which he applied to the Social Security board to make a correction in his date of birth. This leaves us wondering why he would intentionally give an older date to the state of Kansas (and to several others) and a later date to the Social Security office. But, an even more important discrepancy arises in the names, ages and places of birth of his parents.
Based upon the research we have done so far, we cannot pinpoint the exact year of his birth with any certainty, and the following list will help to show the difficulty in determining that year. We have searched the records of the 1885 KS State census for Franklin Co., and have not yet been able to find him, or his family. We did find a record of his father, Ira Homer Morton, in the 1885 KS State census in Franklin Co., KS but in that record Ira stated that he was still a single man, unmarried, and he was living with his married sister, her family, and their aunt and a cousin.
One thing that has been very consistent about Raya€™s documents is that he invariably lists his mothera€™s name as Ida Louise Easley. We searched for twenty-five years to find any record of this woman, other than those listed by Raymond, and were infuriatingly unsuccessfula€¦ until June 2012. She was thirteen years old in the 1870 Federal census for Chetopa, Neosho Co., KS and still livng with her parents and siblings at that time.
In the 1880 Federal census for Lincoln, Neosho, Kansas, we find Aaron and Ida Bonham with a new set of twin boys, just a few months old, Clarence and Lawrence, born in early 1880.
At about the same time, Aaron Bonhama€™s parents had settled in Franklin Co., Kansas, about 80 miles to the north. After this time, we can find no document to indicate that Aaron Bonham was still alive, but neither can we prove that he had died.
Aaron and Ida could have divorced, she then quickly married Ira Morton in the fall of 1885 (after the census) and they could have had a son, Raymond, the following year--Sept 1886.
Aaron could have been away for an extended period and Ida could have met Ira Morton and had a child out of wedlock before Aarona€™s return.
Now, keeping that dilemma in mind, leta€™s proceed with the other documents that we have been able to find for Ida L. Note that at the time of this marriage, she was still going by the name of a€?Bonhama€? -- not Morton. The 1890 Federal census would have been very helpful to us here, but unfortunately, it was destroyed.
We would never have thought to search for this record under the names of a€?Holmesa€? without first finding the record of her marriage. In the very same year, and census for the same county, we find that by the time the census taker had moved on to the home of Martha Bonhama€™s (the widowed mother of Aaron Bonham--and mother-in-law of Ida L. Now, this census was just a very short time after the previous exhibit (above) but here, Ray is listed as being 10 years old, and with the surname of a€?Bonham.a€? It is the same young boy.
Even though Raya€™s mother had moved west, to Arizona, Ray continued to live with Martha Bonham.
The questions must arise, that if Ray was born a€?out of wed-locka€? while Marthaa€™s daughter-in-law was still married to her son, Aaron, one might think that of all of the children, Martha might be the least likely to take this young boy into her home to raise.
Whether Ray was actually going by the Bonham name, as indicated above, or whether the census taker once again made an assumption of that, is not known.
In the 1905 KS State census we again find this family still living in Stafford Co., KS with Frank Bonham now showing as the head of the household, and Martha was still alive at age 78, but Ray is no longer living with them. It is interesting that Ida stated that her parent were born in KY, because in prior census records she had always correctly stated they were born in Tennessee. In the 1920 Federal census for Bakersfield, Kern Co., CA we find the family has moved inland.
Note that Margaret Bonham Kelly had named her oldest son, William Raymond Kelly, with his middle name being a remembrance of her younger brother, Albert Raymond Morton. We have heard that Ida Louise Easley Bonham (Morton) Holmes Hamilton passed away in Bakersfield, CA in the 1930s but we do not have a specific date for her death at this time. In only one record, his a€?Delayed Certificate of Birtha€? did Ray give an estimated age for his father.
We have searched all the available records to try to find anyone by this exact name who may have lived in Kansas, Missouri, Ohio, or any other surrounding state during this period of time and have found no one with that exact name.
We previously mentioned the 1885 Kansas State census [9] in which a€?Ira Mortona€? was living in Williamsburg, Franklin Co., Kansas with his sister, Irene E. From this record, we have been able to go back to both Wisconsin, and New York, and find many records for this particular man. The purpose of this article is to document Raya€™s life, so we will not list all of the documentation for his parents, but merely summarize the key points that are pertinent. This connection, through Ohio, may account for why Ray understood that his father may have come from, and even been born in Cleveland, Ohio, and listed that city as the birth place of his father on one of the documents cited earlier. One other brief comment about this family: When Aunt Shirley Morton Donaldson, Raya€™s youngest daughter, went to Kansas on her research trip, and found the reference to George and Irene Crankshaw living in Williamsburg, she said that that name seemed to have a familiar ring to her from hearing comments made by her father years earlier. We really know very little about Raya€™s youth, but with his consistent statements that he was born in Ottawa, Franklin County, Kansas, that is the first place we began looking. We actually have no other record for him anywhere between the 1900 census record mentioned earlier (for Stafford Co., KS) and the next one in 1915. We did find one interesting record from 1912 that showed a Raymond Morton tried to cross over the boarder into Canada but was turned back by the authorities.
Although the Canadian recruiter judged him fit for duty at the time of his enlistment, Ray was in fact discharged from the army on 18 June 1916 in Toronto, Ontario with the comment that he was a€?medically unfit.a€? He had been entered on the a€?Casualty Forma€? on 22 May 1916 before the actual discharge came through about four weeks later. From this point we know that Ray made his way back to Big Valley, Alberta and went to work in the mines.
This couple moved from place to place seeking work primarily on government jobs, particularly thoughtout the great depression. From this point on, the family has a clear knowledge and recollection of Raya€™s life, and so we will not go into that in this article. It appears that from about 1895, when Ray was approximately 8-10 years old, that he left his mother and siblings to live elsewhere. We hope this presentation is helpful to any of Alberta€™s posterity in future efforts of trying to find and document his life and his ancestry. Note that at the time of this marriage, she was still going by the name of a€?Bonhama€? -- not Morton.A  This adds credence to the supposition that she may not have actually married Ira H. And let me tell you, no one warned me how long, drawn out, repetitive and tedious it would be! My experience may not be that of all future wives, but if I can save even one of you from the trouble, I think I’ve served you well!
If you plan to mail in your applications or apply online, you’ll need  reigstered copies from the government. In order to have this, MSP needs to be notified first before going to the Motor Vehicle branch and MSP takes about 30 days to process. It’ll be used throughout the entire process of changing to your married name, along with your official marriage certificate for proof of authentication.
To tell them you are changing your marital status from Single to Married and you will need your spouse’s SIN number to do so.


Thankfully, none of them are time sensetive or vital to completing this process of changing to your new married name officially.
I’m talking email signatures, online accounts such as your blog bio and social media platforms, like your facebook and twitter accounts. Have questions or know of a great service that can help lessen the stress of this process, email me. As guidelines and government procedures change throughout the years, be aware the above may have changed. We’re excited and proud to start offering these kits, complementary to all KME clients. Seriously is there a reason they make this so hard, I swear if we had to do it prior to the wedding we’d all throw in the hat.
I have been putting this whole thing off for months simply because I couldn’t quite wrap my mind around it! My dear wife asked me to do some research in this regard and your blog post was the first thing I found. The passport application states that you can’t use the “simple passport renewal application” if your name has changed, you have to use the long general adult one. Thank you so very much, really appreciate your consolidated list and easy to understand steps. I was married 8 months ago, and I am just getting around to looking into it now…I have been avoiding it because I have heard how long the process is! And really, it only took 2 full days of applying in person, the rest was waiting for my marriage certificate. It seems that with the new BC Services Card, it now includes Driver Licence and MSP as one card.
The expectation that women should change their last name for marriage, swapping their own identity for their husband's, is -- inarguably -- sexist. I do think it's unequal that children automatically take their father's name, but other approaches are not yet as widely accepted as women keeping their surnames -- though I think this is will change with time. Whether or not I have the same last name as my child won't stop me loving them or feeling attached to them.
However, that's the name I had for the first 29 years of my life before my wedding, and that's who I see myself as. A few decades ago it was common to assume any married woman you met was a housewife; that's not a good reason for women to stay out of the workplace. I love my husband dearly, and hope we are together until we die in each other's arms at the exact same moment at age 100, but it would be naive not to realize that something like a third of western marriages end in divorce. If you, however, are not as fond of your name or do not see it as part of your identity -- perhaps because it's from a parent you don't have a good relationship with, the name is something you got teased for, or you just feel it's not particularly you -- then I think marriage is a great opportunity to take a new name. If you, too, do think "it's just nice", ask yourself what you find nice about it before committing to a decision. This is the fall back position of any believer in Jesus Christ, who does not wish to obey Jesus Christ. He is a graduate of Temple Baptist Academy of Albuquerque and went to Liberty University in Lynchburg, VA.
In addition to celebrities, he also focuses on ordinary people, as seen in the works in his latest show (below) in Beijing. It took him nearly four years to frame more than 1,000 famed faces, including actresses like Gong Li and Zhang Ziyi, and directors Zhang Yimou and Jiang Wen. For instance, he took the photo of Zhang Ziyi when she rested while performing the leading role for the film Purple Butterfly in 2003.
After visiting a solo show of the late American photographer Ansel Adams, famed for his charming black-and-white photography, Pang felt the power and beauty of the simple colors.
The first act, which lasts 90 minutes, has the memorable action of ironing and folding a shirt, as some in the audience joked. He made his only appearance when he was lit from behind a screen at the end of Act I, doing nothing but folding a shirt.
He is the subject of this measured and calculated character study - of a character who is mostly absent from the stage yet increasingly comes into relief as each onstage character reminisces about him.
The freedom to express such views, no matter how biased, does not equal artistic ingenuity. The only sliver of compassion he displayed was for his housekeeper, who seemed to sing his eulogy with clenched teeth. The way he listed the evils of the world before his suicide is a reminder of "the whips and scorns of time, the oppressors' wrong, the proud man's contumely, the pangs of despised love, the law's delay, the insolence of office", etc, when the prince of Denmark contemplated "making his quietus with a bare bodkin". Within the cloistered space of the stage, the balance is often tipped by actors' movements that are concentrated in one corner. When the historical recording of Hitler's speech and mass cheering shattered the Schusters' window glasses, the message came loud and clear.
But in recent years, the village's well-preserved environment has become its greatest selling point. Now the area has more than 10,000 people who work directly or indirectly in the tourism industry. On our second morning there, a light haze hung over the river, obscuring the view of buildings on the other bank. Before entering the valley, we were able to enjoy a show that recreated a scene of boat trackers on the bank pulling a traditional sailboat with ropes.
It extends along the Longjing Brook, whose mirror of light-indigo-blue water is half hidden under thick clumps of bamboo. As we walk closer, we see it is the enactment of a traditional wedding ceremony by the local Tu ethnic group.
There, tourists can enjoy a view of the peaks, the rocks and also a spectacular 1,500-meter-long karst cave. It's a great experience to see it," Australian Stave Sloan says after viewing it as part of a 15-day cruise tour along the river. But her urban dreams are soon shattered as she is abducted by a group of people, taken to a village and sold to a family.
She returns to the same village to reunite with her baby boy, whose biological father is her former captor. Through the abducted woman's perspective, readers not only see the problems of the rural areas, but also the different aspects of village life. So all the characters in the novel are part of the village, and each person has his or her position on issues," says Liang. They try to find ways to communicate with the outside world such as by doing business, and even with Hu Die to reach a reconciliation," she says. He started writing prose in 1965, and in 1992, he completed White Deer Plain, a novel based on the county annals of his hometown, Bailuyuan in Shaanxi. Half a century later, Putzmeister has become not only a global leader in concrete pump makers, but also the embodiment of the mittelstadt - Germany's small or medium-sized family-owned businesses with time-honored traditions, values and management practices (think Bosch and Trumpf). The German businessman was lambasted for "selling the German soul to the Chinese", while Sany was mocked as "a snake that swallowed an elephant". It would have been unreasonable for Putzmeister, which had been China's market leader since 1979, to compete with a new dominant force in the world's biggest market, he says. They saw eye to eye on a key issue - trust - and he empathizes with the humble roots of Liang Wengen, the founder of Sany, a backyard soldering stick maker turned billionaire entrepreneur. When you are successful at home, you want to go abroad to grow your businesses," Schlecht says, punching the air with his fist. Years before the Sany deal, Schlecht, a self-taught philosopher, became fascinated with Confucianism, especially the notion of "Confucian entrepreneurship", which calls for applying ancient Chinese wisdom to business practice. These are values he describes as the nuts and bolts of a global ethic for success, which he has championed. If old friends visit, he puts down his gardening tools to collect them at the airport in his black Mercedes.
He has inspired a new wave of young players who aim to match his career haul of 11 ranking titles.
From Emperor Qinshihuang of the Qin Dynasty (221-206 BC) onward, they have tried to uncover the recipe for immortality. In that beautiful land full of springs, streams and picturesque mountains, Liu An gathered the best Taoist masters - eight of them - and started his search. They didn't succeed, but what was left in the tripod was a pure, white jelly-like substance. Doufunao literally means tofu brains while doufuhua is definitely more lyrical, translating as tofu flowers. In the south, the tender jelly is sweetened with syrups made from plain or brown sugar and flavored with ginger juice.
Or they deep-fry bean curd so that its texture changes and then braise the entire block in a gravy made with soy sauce and sweet spices. It's deep-fried, served with pickled cabbage and sweet chili sauce, boldly advertising its presence through its lovely pungency. She is now a second-year art student in Shanxi province and works part time for 12 Buildings, a studio in Beijing.
Among the 32-year-old's creations is a white cat, which he has since turned into a popular emoji.
To express various levels of anguish, for example, WeChat users can share an animation of the white cat crying while laughing, sobbing in a pool of tears, or wailing while clapping its hands.
In just a short while, she was producing work for instant-messaging tools like QQ and WeChat. The fox, which Xu created in high school, was among the first emojis made available on the QQ messenger in 2012. During the Chinese New Year holiday in February, he topped the emoji charts as users rushed to send friends and relatives seasonal greetings. However, he says China's animation industry lags behind those in the West and Japan, which have worldwide appeal. They hope a more masculine presence can have an effect, but it appears there is still some way to go.
Plus, because of the one-child policy, many children have grown up without siblings and tend to lead sheltered lives. A post-80s generation artist, Yun graduated from the art department of Shenyang University, majoring in murals and frescoes, woodcarving and clay sculpture. Yun can lay claim to creating the split-carving technique, which allows him to compose a piece at scale while keeping the realistic details intact. He feels proud of what he has done but says it is far from enough, with hopes that such a precious cultural relic will be recognized and loved by more and more people. Now home to the iconic Tianzifang, the area is filled with numerous retail outlets, small snack shops, bars and cafes, most of which are occupied by tourists from other Chinese cities and abroad. Today, it is just another tourist attraction, albeit a very famous one, that only has a faint glimpse of its artistic core. Those who are in the area now are also planning to move out," says Yu, who recently led a team of students from Fudan University and Tongji University to conduct an in-depth survey on the current situation of Tianzifang, which is quickly losing its artistic soul to commercialization.
Many men would smoke cigarettes and play poker on tables in the courtyard in the afternoon," says Zheng, who is widely regarded as "the father of Tianzifang".
He leased out the 10,000-square-meter space occupied by the idle factories on a 20-year contract and moved the street market indoors.
This was also the time when Huang Yongyu, another well-known painter, named the area "Tianzifang" as a tribute to an ancient Chinese painter of the same name. Galleries, cafes and boutiques have since opened like clockwork alongside old Shanghai homes, imbuing the area with a unique charm not seen before in the city.
Calls were made for the place to be torn down to make way for high-rise shopping malls that were part of a real estate project by Taiwan's ASE Group. Formerly a slaughterhouse, the place is now home to several creative agencies and design studios. But as time passed, I began to realize the importance of protecting the origins of the place," says Zhou. Middle-aged housewives carrying bags of vegetables would squeeze past expats sipping cappuccino at outdoor cafes. Between 2004 and 2008, as many as 6,000 people would walk along Taikang Road's crowded lanes on weekends. He is now paying 40,000 yuan and said that the rent will exceed 60,000 yuan after his current contract expires in two years.
The place is now filled with more tourism-related items instead of original art works," says Yan, adding that he plans to move out of Tianzifang after fulfilling his rental contract despite his attachment to the area.
It's no surprise that many talented artists are leaving the area," says Zhou Xinliang, the resident of Tianzifang. Over the past five years, retail outlets have steadily replaced the art studios and galleries, which now account for just 2 percent of the shops in Tianzifang. Though he said he does not think that this will lead to the demise of the place, he is concerned that it will eventually result in a change of appearance and the loss of its iconic architecture.
This is getting lost in the process of commercialization," she says, adding that she is very impressed with how the buildings in Tianzifang are preserved.
London's Victoria and Albert Museum has peeled back fashion's layers to expose everything from long johns to lingerie in Undressed, an exhibition tracing the hidden history of underwear.
For centuries, people have worn undergarments for practical reasons of protection, hygiene and comfort - but there has always been an element of sexuality and drama as well. The show, which features more than 200 items made between 1750 and the present day, is dominated by women's undergarments: corsets and crinolines, stockings and shifts, chemises and stays. More recent items include David Beckham boxer shorts and crotch-enhancing Aussiebum briefs. There are 19th-century models with whalebone stays, a modern-day red and black rubber corset by House of Harlot, and one worn by burlesque artist Dita Von Teese with a wince-inducing 18-inch waist. The exhibition traces the history of brassieres, from their development as "bust supporters" in the 1860s through their wide adoption in the early 20th century to the introduction of Lycra in the late 1950s. Ehrman says people have been revealing their undergarments since at least the 16th century. In this exhibit, 110 years after the flight of '14 Bis', we want to show the young that using the imagination is a way of promoting discoveries," Gringo Caria, the curator of the exhibit, says. The world's first cafe using the tiny domestic unmanned aircraft as servers has opened in a Dutch university. In the second document, he changed his year of birth to 1883--which now coincides with his recreated birth certificate. Morton Crankshaw and her family, as well as their widowed Aunt Sarah Cather, and her son, Henry Cather (a cousin of Iraa€™s). 1915, Raymond was standing in the Army recruitera€™s office in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, where he enlisted in the Canadian Over-seas Expeditionary Force. Easley Bonham--the twins who died at just a few months old, and the four living children, three of which (# 1, 2 & 4) all claim that Aaron Bonham was their father, but #3 (Raymond) always claimed that his father was Ira Morton. Aaron and Ida could have divorced, she then quickly married Ira Morton in the fall of 1885 (after the census) and they could have had a son, Raymond, the following year--Sept 1886.A  We know Ira died in 1888, and Ida could have been reconciled to Aaron and remarried him with Bernice born to them in 1888-89. Besides your credit cards, which you will likely use to as your second piece of ID regularly, the above  can be changed over time. So as time permits and your excitement motivates, be sure to change over your cyber presence to reflect your new married name. One is the original and the other is an official replacement approved through the government. I had no idea where to start or what to do when, and your page gave me hope, hehe… It was all and more than I needed, so thank you! I’m getting married on Saturday and you just made me weeks after the wedding much more relaxed!
I waited so long because our marriage certificate is from Costa Rica and looks weird so I was worried I might have more trouble. I have to renew my passport so it’s a good time to change my name on everything else!
I just got married a few weeks ago and have been tackling this since I got back from the USA. And I say "inarguably" because no one could claim there is an expectation of the same name-change in men. Also, with this logic, would I no longer feel like I'm part of my parents' family if I take a different surname from theirs?
But I believe this should be the case for men as well, and that neither gender should feel obligated to switch names. The apostle Paul’s writings are used with great latitude to work around difficult passages in the Scripture.
I simply wonder at what point do we obey the Lord or do we throw most of the bible in the shredder? Pastor Paul served 5 years in the US Air Force, where he worked on the avionic system of the F-16.
His joy is to lead and participate in bible study and to explore what the Lord has in store for us.
Raped by Hei Liang, a member of that family, she lives through her troubles until her mother rescues her with the help of police and a reporter. It tells of changes to the land over 50 years from the end of the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911). Evenings find him helping his wife, Brigitte, make his favorite Swabian noodles or pizza before he retreats to his home office to "fantasize" about new projects. From behind the wheel, the silver-haired Swabian then doubles as an animated tour guide to the picturesque Neckar Valley, his childhood home. Barry Hearn, the chairman of World Snooker, says the Chinese government is pouring investment into sport, which will help the country dominate not only snooker, but also other sports within 10 to 15 years. In the face of increasing globalization, food is also one of the last strong visages of community and culture. A fresh collection of 16 Budding Pop emojis released on March 12 was downloaded 4 million times within 24 hours. In 2005, Yun started his fruit pit carving career, and in 2007 he founded his workshop, Yiren Hequ, attracting many young artists to pit carving. As an artist, you need to devote your feelings, explore your innovative techniques, and commit, he says.
Yun has done his part: creating the next generation of fruit pit carvers with the same dream. You choose and you program it like you want," student and project leader Tessie Hartjes says.
Wish I knew of your business and website while planning my wedding I would of hired you in a heart beat. Might want to add that people from other countries need to have theirs translated and notarized.
I have a unique situation I was just about to embark on changing my surname and I got mad at the PASSPORT people.
Are there no boys in your family to carry on the name?" And then, in a conspiratorial whisper, "Do you not like your husband's last name? Several times I've introduced myself to someone on email and received a message back signed off with "P.S. In these days of blended families, the idea that everyone in a family would have the same last name is a touch old-fashioned. Reflective Groom' on meeting me for the first time -- just as people familiar with me greet him as. But the things that make weddings nice are that they bring together family and friends, celebrate your love, and are an excuse for an awesome party. It declined in the mid-19th century, but the art is back in force in places like Suzhou, Weifang, Guangdong and Liaoning.
Hamilton.A  It could be that for personal safety reasons, that she listed the name of her deceased husband as if he were still living, but there is another listing with the date of 30 Nov. Seeking to inspire this generation as a Professional Wedding Planner, Speaker, Writer and Business Coach, to focus on what matters most in life and leave a legacy of love and service. Thank you for posting this, you have been a great help in keeping many new brides from losing their minds! And if it is so nice to have the same last name as your spouse, perhaps it shouldn't only be women stepping up to make the change.



Change name after marriage quebec
Organization change theory pdf
Read the secret circle 6 online usa



Comments to «Changing my name after marriage on passport»

  1. oO writes:
    Handling any state of affairs in life over the world.
  2. parin_iz_baku writes:
    Each day bodily exercise results.
  3. 5555555 writes:
    Apps like Headspace (a decent place to begin for meditation, by the way) suan Mokkh.
Wordpress. All rights reserved © 2015 Christian meditation music free 320kbps.