preload

13.01.2015
Apech: I have of late been having interesting sensations at the top of my head which feel like pulsing and give the image of an underwater creature like a jelly fish. Apech: I wasn't seeing the pulse as a problem - in fact its mildly pleasant - so I'll keep away from the medics! MF: I would think based on my own experience that the sensation at the top of your head is happening in conjunction with the regular cessation of habitual activity in the movement of breath, and that same cessation will bring the mind to one place or another over time to round out the involuntary activity connected with the sensation.
Apech: I'm not quite sure what you mean by the 'cessation of the habitual activity in the movement of the breath' - can you explain that a little?
MF: A lot of the time, the things we do by intention with our bodies dictate the movement of breath. Gautama described the cessation of habitual activity as gradual, occurring first with respect to speech, then with regard to inhalation and exhalation, and finally with regard to perception and sensation. Olaf Blanke is a Swiss neuro-biologist studying out-of-body experience, and his hypothesis is that it's the vestibular organs (sense of equalibrium), otolithic organs (sense of gravity), proprioceptors (sense of placement and motion in the muscles, joints, and ligament), and eyes that coordinate to provide the sense of self. I think the cessation of unhappiness I experience corresponds with the role of these senses in sustaining pressure in the "fluid ball" of the abdomen (per D. Fourth state, happiness apart from equanimity ceases, and habitual activity in inhalation and exhalation ceases. The senses fundamental to the experience of self were not a part of the vocabulary of Gautama's day, except for the eyes.
The phrase "if there is ch'i, then there is no strength" refers to the effortlessness of posture that can be realized in the natural movement of breath, an effortlessness that is based on the simultaneity of equalibrioception (that sustains the posture) and proprioception (that supports it~see Simultaneity and Things). The phrase "without ch'i then essential hardness is achieved" refers to the effort involved in posture when some aspect of posture is not supported; the body will develop strength as necessary to compensate for the lack of support. I'm never happier than when simple mindfulness of just breathing in or breathing out occurs in me. The 'feeling for the posture supported by the distinction of the senses' allows me to make an eye in the place of an eye, a hand in the place of a hand, and a foot in the place of a foot. Let me say that I don't know whether or not the word underlying the translation 'image' has the meaning I am giving it, yet the meaning that I'm giving it is the one that has significance to me. The writing of mine I quote from above largely concerns the emphasis some Zen teachers place on the role of the 'tanden', or 'hara' in the experience of shikantaza. The way the feeling for posture overflows from the 'tanden' to the tailbone and becomes support to the surface of the skin seems to me also a function of 'an image in the place of an image'. I have spent the last several years in an American Zen temple that by our standards is strict and intense, but my training, I am finding, seems moot here. Gautama's description of the first and third concentrative states in some ways resembles the descriptions of the "tanden" (or tan-t'ien), while his description of the second and fourth concentrative states suggests something somewhat different. I wrote to a friend and told him about my writing, and he said he looked forward to reading it. In the parlance of the Pali Canon, the first meditative state is characterized by "thought applied and sustained", and "thought applied and sustained" ceases in the second meditative state.
Gautama taught "the setting up of mindfulness" in Satipatthana Sutta, but later (in my opinion, later) he taught that his "way of living", his "way of living in the rainy season", and "the Tathagatha's way of living" consisted of "concentration on in-breathing and out-breathing" (outlined here ). My principal delight these days is that I perceive the sixteen to key on an interchange between activity that sustains pressure in the fluid ball of the abdomen (in support of posture) and comprehension of the long or short of inhalation or exhalation. When things get painful with regard to the stretch around that boiler in the lower abdomen, I look for a sense of the fluid ball that is pressurized by activity throughout the body, and I move to comprehending the long or short of inhalation and exhalation.
In 1931, Godel published two theorems that demonstrate that if a formal axiomatic theory is consistent, then it is necessarily incomplete (some things that are known to be true are not provable within the theory), and if a formal axiomatic theory is complete, then it is inconsistent (a contradiction can be derived within the theory).
We know that as much as anything can be established in mathematics, Godel's theorems have been established. For me, it all boils down to keeping a watchful eye whenever someone talks in terms of a "completed infinity" instead of in terms of particulars and relationships. When I let go of my notions of "completed infinity", I am left with things just as they are; turns out, that's the domain where the logic we're all familiar with applies. Seems clear to me that completely relaxed activity depends on reciprocal innervation in all three planes, and a lot of my writing is devoted to describing particular ligaments and muscles that reciprocate in each of the three planes.
My big leap forward was applying Upledger's cranial-sacral treatment method to myself, by including gravity in my experience of where I am and things. A little harder to bring it home on the cushion, and in fact I now rely on the comprehension of breathing in and breathing out that Gautama spoke of to do the heavy lifting.
I would add to what my friend said only that, of course, finding the movement of awareness while asleep is not something a person can practice. I'm contending that normal resting activity supports pressure in the fluid ball, and the fluid ball supports the spine and the posture in general. If you sit cross-legged, then about 25 minutes in, maybe, look for support for the fluid ball from the left and right calves in alternation, it's mostly a placement and weight thing that affects the stretch in the ilio-tibial bands but there's a fascial connector from the quads to stretch the bands above the knees so the hams and the quads are involved and it feels like breathing through the legs; walking along, riding the ox. At about 30 minutes in or 35, the stretch across behind the sacrum with the legs and the gluts and the tensor fascias involved allows the left and right of the PC to support the fluid ball, everything is wound up in the balance, the ox crosses the wooden bridge. The cessation of habitual activity in the movement of breath, the freedom of the location of awareness to shift around, like the rest really can't be done, but that doesn't mean it doesn't happen.
To me, the mind that sits is the heart-mind, and my heart-mind feels at home when my vestibular sense comes into play right where I am; that to me is the mind sitting.
If I feel as though I'm moving backward in space, I may suddenly have an acute sense of where my awareness is in my body, and that location may not be in my head.
It's my understanding that the Chinese word now translated as "mind" was once translated as "heart-mind".
Cheng states that once the ch'i has sunk to the tan-t'ien, it circulates through the body and accumulates at the tan-t'ien. I can experience my eyes affecting my sense of place, yet I can also free my sense of place to move in spite of the connection with my eyes.
Now I find that, like a bagpiper whose activity works the bag while they walk, my activity supports the fluid ball of the abdomen, and the location of my awareness responds as I comprehend the long or short of inhalation or exhalation.
The place where I am can "turn and move freely everywhere" (as another translator rendered "somersaults"), and the place where I am can also remain stationary; when the place where I am is free to move yet remains stationary, the rest of me may turn around the place where I am, instead. While I sometimes separate out and bring forward certain senses in the experience of place, and at those moments my ability to find where I am appears in fact to depend on the exercise, there is in the wake of such moments an awareness of where I am as contact in any sense takes place. I'm sure that the waist is a key part of how pressure is obtained in the "fluid ball" of the abdomen, and consequently of how the comprehension of the long and short of inhalation and exhalation becomes embodied as the posture; I wanted to share the excerpts from the Tai-Ch'i classics about that here.
Here's the funny part: I began to comprehend the long or short of a given movement of breath.
Comprehension of the long or short of breath is significant to me in that it was a part of Gautama the Buddha's "setting up of mindfulness" practice. Since I started limbering up in this way, I can sit comfortably in half-lotus for two rounds of 40 minutes, with kinhin between.
In my write about Fuxi's poem, I put forward Bartilink's findings about "pressure in the fluid ball of the abdominal cavity" and support for the lower spine, including his observation that activity in the muscles of the pelvic floor and in the transverse muscles of the abdomen and chest is responsible for the "pressure in the fluid ball". As to how one goes about initiating such "pressure in the fluid ball of the abdomen", I like Fuxi's "The empty hand grasps the hoe handle"; something about the way the placement and weight of the arms and hands engages the ilio-tibial bands, and the placement and weight of the lower legs likewise at the knee- I find my hands and feet, and get my ass kicked. For me it's like working a potter's wheel with my feet while molding a lump of clay with my hands. I have seen "rapture" and "joy" translated elsewhere as "absorption" and "ease"; what I myself experience is an "absorption and ease" that amounts to a fluidity of weight, so that as consciousness arises from a part, the saturation of the sense of gravity throughout the body increases. Sometimes transverse muscles at the level of a particular vertebrae are a part of my breathing, and maybe I'm more aware of my neck and head when they are. I devote a lot of my thought to reassuring myself that it's alright to experience depth in senses other than the eyes and the mind, particularly in the proprioceptive and vestibular senses, even when it makes me feel like a bat on a city street in the daylight.
Yuanwu made a connection between "biting through here" and the ability to "cut off conditioned habits of mind", where to "cut off conditioned habits of mind" meant to cease any voluntary activity of thought or direction of the body, just as though one were letting go of life itself. This, from a guy who was once in a lab where they measured him going through states usually associated with sleep as he began his practice. I agree that a relinquishment of the mental is involved, yet I am now turning on the experience of the senses as such; in particular, the sense of equalibrium, the sense of gravity, and the sense of place associated with muscles, joints, and ligaments (proprioception), along with the sense of the mind. As to the brain waves near zero: to the extent that the phenomena of the heart-mind that moves, that shifts, and that is a part of action in the absence of volition is a phenomena of trance, I hope that the discussion of trance may be relevant to a discussion of "how do you properly drop your brain into the lower dan tien". The place and things is the practice of "shikantaza", as Kobun Chino Otogawa once said, yet as he pointed out the range of the things that enter into the practice easily exceeds the boundaries of the senses (here, in the section "Shikantaza"). In sitting, it's my own breath that is the tide in my toes, and understanding the anatomy helps me settle into the sand (as it were). I have now added illustrations, and I hope that they will help in the visualization of the descriptions. The key in that short description for me would be the words "the sense 'I am'"; Nisargadatta is referring to a sense.
That's the introduction to a new work entitled Fuxi's Poem on the site, and any comments or suggestions with regard to the work made here on Zazen Notes will be gratefully received.
I get out of balance sometimes because something's not quite comfortable in my posture and I've somehow become numb to it, and over the years I have formed a habit of checking where I left myself physically when things get weird. Indeed, it's doing something, but it is really only the recollection of the latest in a long trail of investigations that grew out of mindfulness. Ok, now see if you can add a sense of motion forward and backward at the location of awareness. For me this is effective, but I have a lot of training in connection with the induction of trance through relaxation in conjunction with inhalation and exhalation, so I don't know if you will experience what I experience. Right away you will probably come to a relationship between motion at the sacrum, regularly initiated by the psoas rocking the pelvis as it slides over the front corners, and the location of awareness.
On some level it's just where I am, and a distinction of the senses that comes of its own accord.
Well, it all seems a bit esoteric, even though I do recognize the muscle names you cite from having looked at several yoga anatomy books and I know their general locations within the body.


Maybe that "sense of location" can be perceived as bobbing around those 3 axes of movement in a kind of quasi-physical sense, just as an airplane moves through air or a boat through water.
Clearly the context in that case was falling asleep, humbleone (his pseudo on Tao Bums) was having difficulty waking up and being unable to get back to sleep. A lama who lectured at Shambala Sonoma spoke of how his teacher would show him a card with a mandala on it, then turn the card over and ask him to recreate the mandala in his mind (the lama did not say how the exercise applied in his spiritual training, but the lama who was speaking clearly felt it was important).
That's what I have with regard to the activity of the muscles I mentioned: an image of my body that I have built up in my mind. Yes I do sometimes isolate the action of what I believe are the muscle groups I named, and sometimes I might even contract a muscle slightly to recall how that action affects the stretch I'm in. Or under the pelvis to the hip bones in a side-to-side motion, activity pulling on the hips that seems to leverage me into the seat-- obturators?
It's a trick, because the action of particular muscles described in the texts varies according to which part is held still, and they're not usually assuming you're sitting cross-legged or doing one of the poses of Tai-Chi.
The PC is interesting, because it's not about contraction per se for me (what, no Kegels?)-- it's about the sense of weight and no part of the body left out, and the alignment of the tailbone and spine, that's the way it seems. I built up an image, maybe the names are right, maybe I feel the piriformis rotating the sacrum opposite the gluts and tensors, maybe I just feel more in general when I think I can feel the piriformis rotating the sacrum and so I assume I have the description right when in fact something else is going on. Yes, some anatomy-oriented yoga teachers also emphasize the psoas, so I know where that is (deep paired left right lowest abdominal muscles on the inside of the pelvis). Other thing would be Raymond Richard's assertion in "Lesions of the Sacrum" that the ligaments and fascia that connect the sacrum to the pelvis, and the articulations of the sides of the sacrum and the edges of the pelvis, allow the sacrum to not only pivot forward and back, but on the diagonals and around the vertical plumb line.
One of Erickson's approaches to trance induction bears remarkable resemblance to one of the methods of teaching employed by the Zen masters. The "turning phrase" of a Zen teacher is the result of a spontaneous pivot in the teacher's frame of reference, perhaps in response to a question or a situation; the phrase or word that expresses the pivot can invoke a transderivational search in the listener, and allow for the induction of trance.
With the "turning phrase", the Zen master leaves any listener "stopped in the middle", which allows the induction of trance and a heightened awareness of the function of the senses that provide the experience of self. That the senses are involved in the experience of self is the conclusion of scientists Olaf Blanke and Christine Mohr.
The tactil-proprioceptive-kinesthetic and vestibular senses are closely involved with the perception of a person's physical location in space; the visual sense is tightly connected to both of these senses, and can reset the perception of location.
Lately I'm on a lot about proprioception in equalibrioception-- "with no part of the body left out", a singularity in the sense of location and a freedom of the sense of location to move. More correctly, though, it's got to be all of the senses including touch "with no part left out", where "with no part left out" is the extension of the mind of compassion in the ten directions to infinity.
And a relinquishment of volition in activity, self-surrender the object of thought, so that when the wind blows from the realm of infinite ether the limbs can move, so to speak.
It gets complicated when people like Sasaki claim that they did their misdeeds as a matter of ishinashini, that their hand was will-less. More significant maybe is the way that the experience of people on the other side of the wall creating motion in the limbs gives me some faith that it's alright to return to not knowing, because not knowing isn't necessarily not doing.
Sometimes I'm aware of the obturators side to side hammocking hips from the pelvis, sometimes of piriformis and gluteous rotating sacrum and pelvis independently, sometimes of sides of the PC and rectus balancing a feeling of uprightness. My understanding is that when awareness is allowed a freedom of location with the relaxed movement of breath, some of the phenomena described as the circulation and accumulation of chi may be felt in connection with the sense of location and the movement of breath. You could say that the chi returns from the head-top to the skin and hair all over the body, and the freedom of the sense of location to move is suddenly like the freedom in falling asleep. In a stationary posture, proprioception takes place as the body is relaxed with the movement of breath. John Upledger speaks of how he learned to feel what he says is the rhythm of the cranial-sacral system with his hands, about how he can feel where the rhythm is moving well and add a pressure equivalent to 5 grams of weight to that movement to open the places in the body that are stuck.
Gautama's description of consciousness as the result of contact between sense organ and sense object resonates for me as a way to describe the consciousness that includes proprioception, equalibrioception, and the sense of gravity among the other senses, even though the tight connection between my eyes and my sense of location might sometimes make it seem otherwise.
I've been sitting a lot with the controlling faculties of the four initial meditative states, as described in the Pali Canon sermon volumes.
This is an everyday occurrence, and I would agree with the view ascribed to the therapist Milton Erickson that "these states are so common and familiar that most people do not consciously recognize them as hypnotic phenomena" (Wikipedia for Milton Erickson).
Now, as to the controlling faculties, Gautama spoke of the cessation of a particular "controlling faculty" in each of the first four meditative states. At the site of your regular sitting, spread out thick matting and place a cushion above it. Once you have adjusted your posture, take a deep breath, inhale and exhale, rock your body right and left and settle into a steady, immobile sitting position.
The production has already started in France and the first vehicles will hit the European market in spring 2012. Stay tuned with exclusive news from the car industry, download high-resolution wallpapers at no cost and share everything you love on the social media. Although a bit of noise rarely prevents people from meditating successfully, the old texts warn against sitting where the wind is strong or the sun is hot. Placing religious objects in the meditation room helps to create an appropriate atmosphere.
Good incense too is also conducive to meditation, with its delicate fragrance helping calm the mind and provide a sense of purification.
After an appropriate place for zazen has been selected, one is ready to begin preparations for sitting.
In the half-lotus position the right foot is under the left thigh and the left foot rests on top of the right thigh (or vice versa). The right hand should be placed palm up on the lap; the left hand should be placed palm up on the right hand.
The upper body should be relaxed and free of tension, while the lower part should be settled and open.
Once the bodya€™s posture is balanced and settled, attention should be turned to the breathing.
The practice of susokkan (breath-counting) is recommended for people meditating on their own. Although zazen can explained by dividing it into the elements of body, breath, and mind, it should be remembered that these three can not really be divided. Consciousness, said Gautama, is followed by impact and then by feeling, with regard to each of the six senses.
Sometimes I think that is why he made such a distinction between the mind and consciousness, and why dependent causation begins with ignorance: the senses most involved in the experience of the lack of any abiding self in the activity of breath (and in the activity of perception and sensation) were not known to him by name. Consciousness, said Gautama, is followed by impact and then by feeling, with regard to each of the six senses (1). This morning I asked myself, does feeling for the posture supported by the distinction of the senses allow me to make an image in the place of an image? Shortly before the close of the forty minutes, there was a transition, something like what you speak of. Moreover, he claimed the sixteen aspects of "concentration on in-breathing and out-breathing" were his "way of living" prior to his enlightenment, and that the sixteen constituted one instance of the mindfulness of body, feelings, mind, and state of mind. I would offer that the "spontaneous emergence of the undifferentiated mind" is one-pointed, that it involves the experience of a singular location in space, a singular location informed not only by each of the senses but by what is beyond the boundary of each sense as well.
That I believe is my necessity, to apply and sustain thought in such a manner, in my case in order to simply breathe (sometimes). Hilbert conceded that the propositions of classical mathematics which involve the completed infinite go beyond intuitive evidence. It's a lot of fun, and I guess you could say that for me there's a tie-in with the martial arts, in that I learned to dance in the midst of people slamming at Mabuhay Gardens. Can't rely on anything for long, but I'm betting that his "best of ways" can be close to a second skin for all of us who find ourselves "loving our time by way of the senses, by way of the body". What I have found, though, is that it is possible to practice finding the movement of awareness just before sleep. More so if you are lifting weight (he put something in the abdomen, surgically, to measure it). So the activity when nothing seems to be doing anything, but I'm upright, supports the fluid ball; something must be doing something. I find that my heart-mind can remain in the vicinity of the tan-t'ien if I exercise my vestibular and proprioceptive senses along with my sense of location; perhaps the experience of proprioception in connection with location is what Cheng referred to as the circulation of ch'i. He states as an example that a person on a train who sees another train go by in the opposite direction will sometimes get the feeling they are moving when they are not.
The mind not turning is the central equalibrium resulting from the sinking of ch'i to the tan-t'ien. Action can happen when I feel like a bat; in fact for me, appropriate action is more a function of where I am than of what I think. Relaxation and relinquishment that frees the heart-mind to move, however slightly, also realizes action from the distinct elements that make up the self, without embracing the notion of a self. Yuanwu stated that as a matter of course, such a cessation of habitual activity results in a feeling that the activity of breath in the body has been cut off, and causes a person to come to their senses as though returned to life from the dead. For me, the feeling is a lot like standing out where the waves break in at the beach, and sorting out the direction and strength of the flow of each wave in order to keep my feet. If you are seated, after you read this close your eyes, and see if you can register where your awareness is in your body. I tried your suggestion and it had some kind of tangible imaginative effect that's hard to describe. The action of the obturators to hammock the hips from the pelvis and allow a turning motion in the action of the sartorius, the gluts, the tensors, and the piriformis may cross your mind, the weight of the body "with no part left out" may focus from the lower front of the abdomen across the PC's to the tailbone (and up the spine to the head bones), the surface of the skin may come forward. He was actually able to get back to sleep consistently with this practice (allowing movement in the sense of location). The sense of location and the three motions there help me to discover the stretch I'm in at the moment, so I can relax particular activity.


So, for example, I'm contracting something between my leg and the upper wing of the pelvis that turns the pelvis ; I'm thinking "sartorius". I have taken my best guess at the names but the places and actions have been fairly consistent.
First is that if you are alert to the three directions of motion where awareness takes place with the eyes open, there can be a sense of continuity; it's a little less of what humbleone described, and a lot more like tan-t'ien with no part left out (usually). He further asserts that in the normal course of affairs the sacrum can move to a lower, more open pivot on the pelvis, and in one of my writings I mention that this is fundamental in a slight vertical stretch of the extensors so that action of the sacrum can be carried upward through the three sets of extensors to the head bones.
The premise there is that changes in the volume of fluid that surrounds the spinal cord and the brain cause flexion and extension of the entire body. It's like a pair of tin-cans with strings and washers, and the return is in the cranial-sacral rhythm and the way in which it eases the nerve exits along the spine, until the ability to feel is live throughout the body to the surface of the skin. The T'ai-Ch'i master Chen Man-Ch'ing said that when the entire body is relaxed, including the chest, the ch'i can sink to the tan-t'ien and circulate; I would say that in Zen practice, the mind or the "heart-mind" sinks to the tan-t'ien and circulates. I often look for specific feelings of pitch, yaw, and roll in my awareness; as my sense of location registers the movements that are always present in my balance, proprioception and the sense of gravity enter into my sense of location and exert the kind of slight pressure where things are moving that Upledger used, allowing the sense of location to act to open and align the body. Please watch this excellent video on zazen (sitting meditation) Do not worry if you cannot sit in lotus position, as noted in the video you can sit on a chair or other positions that you find more comfortable on cushions on the floor. It boasts new style codes, new equipment and a Euro 5 engine range which makes it a front-runner on its segment (PC and LUV) when it comes to CO2 emissions.
Generally one must settle for a place where outside sounds are at a minimuma€”in a study, for example, or a bedroom. A stick of incense ordinarily burns for thirty to forty minutes, a good length of time for a single sitting of zazen. A thick cushion is much more comfortable for long sitting periods than a thin one, as it provides better support. If Western-style clothing is worn instead of robes, then the belt should be loosened a notch or two and the necktie removed. Raise the trunk once again to the upright posture, leaving the pelvis tipped forward and the lower back curved in. For people with injuries or who for whatever reason cannot manage any of these positions, it is possible to meditate quite well in a chair. Look straight forward at first, then drop the gaze 45 degrees till one is looking at a point on the floor about two meters in front of one. The head should be upright, with the face vertical and not inclined forward, and with the chin pulled in a bit. In many ways the breathing, which links and integrates body and mind, is the most important aspect of zazen. It can help to breathe with the sense that one is simply connecting the air inside of the body and outside of the body. Be fully conscious of each and every breath, and be sure to maintain awareness as exhalation changes to inhalation and inhalation changes to exhalation. When stray thoughts, fantasies, and judgments of right and wrong arise, illuminate them with an awareness that is relaxed but fully awake.
Sit with a feeling of firmess and stability, like Mount Fuji rising from the plain into the sky. Roshi-sama is said to be a master of this wide practice of shikantaza, the objectless meditation characteristic of the Soto school. That others affect the place where I am, is nowhere more apparent than on a crowded dance floor. I look to where awareness is at the moment, not where the object of awareness is, but where the awareness that perceives the object is. How to get a feeling for the fluid ball of the abdomen, in relation to the activity of posture; maybe start with the arms and the hands, imagine someone sitting down to balance a house of cards warming up by shaking it out. Blanke points out that this is because the eyes have a tight connection with the sense of place. Bartilink, "No Special Effort", and the "Best of Ways", from which the quote above is taken.
Returned to one's senses, the location of awareness shifts in three-dimensional space without restriction, as in empty space; activity in the body is engendered by virtue of the location of awareness and the nerve impulses generated by ligaments and fascia as they stretch in response to the relaxed necessity of breath, without volition. I think the answer is yes, but I only have one example of it with regard to my recollections.
But now I get the sense you are applying these terms more to subtle (energy) body orientation than to physical?
Are you actually able to recognize and distinguish the actions of these individually-named muscles from each other yourself? I asked him to try it in the daytime (with his eyes open), and he discovered what he described as a sense of peace when he did. I tend to forget about psoas, rocking the pelvis as it slips across the pubic bones and stretching open the ilio-sacral joints, but if I relax I do believe it does.
Just as Rolf emphasizes the psoas, Heller body workers emphasize the importance of learning to contract this area. I believe this is because of the tight connection between the vestibular organ and the eyes, the eyes can reset the way the vestibular sense is read (in effect). I don't really feel the sacrum moving to a different pivot, but if I am mindful of the action of the psoas loosening the fascial connections between the sacrum and pelvis then the weight of the body (in whatever part comes to mind, no part left out) does seem eventually to set me upright, like a dunking Chinese chicken toy.
The free movement of the sacrum on horizontal, diagonal, and vertical axes inherent in the structure of the joins with the pelvis is critical, as is the movement of the occiput, the sphenoid, the temporals and parietals.
Here I am talking about proprioception and equalibrioception informing one another, a kind of movement and centering in the location of awareness that normally takes place with the eyes closed just before falling asleep, but in Zen practice takes place with the eyes open while waking up. In the full-lotus position, you first place your right foot on your left thigh and your left foot on your right thigh. Those who have a garden may wish to sit by its side, where they can be as close as possible to nature. This posture, once one is accustomed to it, creates the most relaxed and stable foundation for zazen. In the half-lotus position the bodya€™s center may be slightly out of balance, so it is good to switch legs from one sitting to the next.
The back should be straight, as described above, and the pelvis should be a bit higher than the knees. The top of the head should point to the ceiling, with the ears in line with the shoulders and the tip of the nose directly over the navel. Continue in this from one moment to the next, from one sitting period to the next, until onea€™s mind is clear and open. Whether you consider the body, the breath, or the mind, the other two elements are always present. Even a short sitting in your home every day will help you attain this sense of calm openness. In the experience of these senses, feelings similar to those Gautama described can be found, but it's the familiarity with these senses rather than any particular modality of feeling that allows for the cessation of habitual activity in connection with breath. But he insists, again and again, weeping at my deafness, shouting at my stubbornness, that hara focus is precisely shikantaza. And I don't want to tie my mind in knots trying to come up with some kind of discombobulated intellectual understanding either, so I'll just let it percolate. When I'm relaxed, I fall awake the way humbleone fell asleep, everything enters in with nothing left out and the place where I am sits. At the top of the head in the suture between the parietals is a set of nerves that control the changes in volume of the spinal fluid. If a thick cushion is not available, then two thin ones, one on top of the other, will suffice.
Placing a cushion on the seat of the chair can raise the pelvis and make sitting more comfortable. Sitting with eyes completely closed should be avoided, as it can easily lead to drowsiness or a lack of focus. The exhalation should be long, deep, and relaxed, with the breath allowed to go out as far as it naturally wishes to go.
A posture that is straight, balanced, and relaxed will help bring about a mind that open and fully aware; a mind that is open and fully aware will help bring about a posture that is balanced and straight. That it makes no sense makes it no less inspiring; it is his presence, not his words, that I believe. As to "adding motion" to the "location of awareness", my experience yesterday in that little exercise was that the "location of awareness" kind of expanded in its internally-perceived "size". Beyond that, I'm not sure what you're onto-- I know it has much more meaning and specificity to you. Then place your right hand on your left leg and your left palm (facing upwards) on your right palm, thumb-tips touching. I was just trying to get you to explain what the "pitch, roll and yaw" apply to since we aren't airplanes or boats.
Thus sit upright in correct bodily posture, neither inclining to the left nor to the right, neither leaning forward nor backward. And you seem to be referring to those motions in relation to the muscles that come into play around the sacrum and how that affects the "location of awareness". Be sure your ears are on a plane with your shoulders and your nose in line with your navel.



Secrets to a successful business partnership hub
Mind power training in cochin
Secret of my success movie poster online
The hunt secret circle epub



Comments to «Zazen is not meditation»

  1. Vampiro writes:
    Perception Meditation is a branch of Vipassana meditation, supplied all through the United massachusetts coast, the Jesuit-run.
  2. ELNUR writes:
    Patients, and cut back symptoms in patients with fibromyalgia talked about the use of mindfulness specialized.
  3. tenha_urek writes:
    Meditation, yoga, breathing workouts and delicate stretching nail down and.
Wordpress. All rights reserved © 2015 Christian meditation music free 320kbps.