How to get your music onto itunes for free

Doc love dating tips for guys

Send text from gmail to iphone,how to convince ex boyfriend to come back lyrics,relationship help gold coast jobs - PDF Books

This quilt was made according to the specifications dictated by the government for making a flag, so it is politically correct!! These dimensions are for a twin quilt, but due to the proportions of the American Flag (the length is nearly twice the width), the quilt is extra long!
With this quilt, you will probably have to piece the batting to get the extra length, so keep that in mind as you fine-tune your measurements.
If you like traditional applique, just print this out, cut it out, add a seam allowance before cutting out the fabric, and applique in place.
This really is an easy quilt to piece, especially if you use a starr-y fabric for the blue field. Sew the long stripes together, alternating, as follows: white, red, white, red, white, red. Polyester battings are puffier, hotter (it does not breath like cotton) and will not shrink the quilt, so the design will stay intact more, if that is what you wish. For a super-fast quilt, you could just layer it as follows: backing and batting right sides together, and then the batting. San Diego International and Carlsbad Palomar Airport this is a small airport - we love it, use it all the time.
If you book outside of our wedding party and on your own, please email Lisa with your hotel reservation,(or staying with friends-family)  so we will know where you are. YOU’RE ALL INVITED FOR BreakfastWe will be having a Sunday brunch around 10:00am at the wedding site -(vacation rental in La Jolla). First off, please note that this article is based on the pre-release beta of Gmail, so presumably, the public release will have additions, changes, and improvements. Messages are listed in a typical way, displaying the sender, subject, the first few words of the message body, and the date. On the left are links that let you compose a message, and select different standard message groups (like Inbox, Sent mail, etc.) Again, it's one of the quick ways to find a specific message.
When you click on a message in the Inbox, the message opens for you to read or taks action. When you "star" a message, you can later click on the "Starred" link on the left of the Inbox screen and Gmail will display all messages that have been "starred". Some may view this as a weakness, bu don't forget that this isn't a corporate groupware product, this is a free webmail service.
The only thing I don't like about Gmail's implementation is that it doesn't provide for partial word searches. Now that I have shown you what Gmail can do, here is a list of some suggestions that I feel will significantly improve the service.
Add an "Export" function to be able to copy emails out of Gmail providing users the ability to have "offline" storage and access. Integrate the Search funciton into the above suggested Export function to allow selective exporting.
Add an "External Email" function to be able to pull in emails from other POP and IMAP accounts instead of having to forward those accounts to Gmail.
Add capability to "Label" Contacts (defined separately from the Message "labels".) Currently, contacts are simply a list. Have "Filters" optionally apply to ALL emails instead of just those selected or just new emails. Add an "Advanced Settings" option to allow "power users" to "tweak" more options such as edit box dimensions, screen colors, etc. On the Settings screen, the entry "Maximum page size: Show XX conversations per page" has values of 25, 50, and 100. Integrate Gmail notification into the Google Toolbar that would display the number of new messages in my Gmail Inbox.
If Gmail was generally available in its current state, I wouldn't recommend it for primetime, particularly for the "forwarding problam". I have a large number (about 1000) of archived emails that I have saved over the years, and I am looking for a way to "import" them into Gmail so that I can leverage Gmail's excellent Search and Label features. Well, I spent some time last night "importing" all of my archived emails into Gmail, and it really wasn't too bad. Next, I logged onto my Primary POP3 provider's webmail account and moved all emails from various folders into my Inbox.
I next went back to me Webmail account and moved all the messages into a "hold" folder clearing out my Inbox so that I wouldn't re-retrieve them. Next, I opened Windows Explorer and opened the folder that contained 310 old ".eml" files that I had previously archived offline.
Side note: I found out that my particular POP3 provider won't allow a "send" of more than 100 emails at-a-time, so I had to work with batches of 100 or less emails.
Next, I created a "Message Rule" in OE that would look for all messages whose subject line DIDN'T contain a unique string forward those messages.
I then moved batches of 100 emails from the Hold folder into the Temp folder, opened the message rule, and clicked "Apply Now", browsed to the Temp folder and clicked "Go". Anyway, I now have a very clean and virtually empty Inbox and a new Label with 960 "archived" messages. Now, if I just can figure out how to get past Eudora's "Relay" issue as well as figuring out how to import ".eml" files, I wouldn't hesitate trashing all the messages I imported last night and re-doing it letting Eudora apply the proper "From" name. Say you have a desk full of paper messages, some messages are from family members, and some are jokes that your friends have sent you.
If you followed me this far, you should have absolutely no problem understanding Gmail's Label concept.
To leverage Gmail's excellent Label and Search functions, I imported close to 1000 archived emails into my Gmail account. One neat feature of Gmail that may not be obvious at first is that Gmail "remembers" what emails you have "checked". Basically, the concept is to email yourself the notes, but Gmail lets you at least better organize and handle these emails.
When you want to email yourself from your own Gmail account, click "Compose Email", and just type "Notes" in the "To" field and hit "Tab" or "Enter".
You now have a Label containing any notes you want to keep, and they are completely searchable! Gmail's account names (you know, the "left" side of your email address) are very forgiving. Using our example, say you email an invitation to your friends in a club asking them to rsvp to the invitaion. When Gmail was first released to Beta, it was missing the ability to create an automatically appended "Signature".
Go into "Settings" and click the radio button next to the edit box in the Signatire section. There are some idiosyncracies that you should understand when working with large numbers of messages. If you are working with a large number of emails, (more than will fit on one screen "page") be sure to remember that checking "All" doesn't check all messages in the category you are viewing, but only those visible on the current page.
Open your Gmail account and look at both the "Title" of your web browser as well as the "Button" in the Task Bar.
One thing that you might overlook is that is that you need to remember that when you perform an action on a conversation such as "Print", "Move to Trash", or "Report as Spam", you are affecting ALL messages in the conversation.
Unlike many other Web-based email providers, Gmail offers an SSL-encrypted login by default.
One concept that's sometimes a bit unclear to new Gmail users is that of "Archiving" messages. First off, you need to determine if the message is a single message or part of a conversation. If you want to affect only a single message within a conversation, you must first open the message to view it and then click on the "More Options" link while viewing the message.
Conversations are very convenient and powerful, but actually dealing with them can be confusing at times. In keeping with this "future-thinking" mindset, by retaining the messages you send, Gmail easily and conveniently matches those messages to any corresponding replies onto "Conversations" making following threads of conversation easier.
When you initiate a Search, Gmail returns a list of any messages and conversations matching the Search criteria. Gmail has some advanced searching capabilities that, if you take the time to learn, enables you drill down to very specific information. If you want to search for all messages having a specific label, you can click on the "Show search options" link, click the "Search" dropdown, select the desired Lable, and click the "Search Mail" button. Note: the specific label names are NOT case sensitive, but the "OR" operator is case sensitive, and must be in uppercase. One very important note to Gmail users: Gmail's "Forward" function only forwards plain text. Theoretically, Gmail could fix this by adding a "Forward as Attachment" option in addition to the standard Forward links. Finally, note that while this behavior is not exclusive to Gmail, I feel it's important enough to let people know. Clicking the "Show Search Options" link will open up a pane containing several entry fields and dropdowns.
But as more savvy users, we often crave, as Tim The Toolman Taylor says, "More power!" Gmail also provides users the ability to prefix their search keywords with "query words" that instruct Gmail how to search. But this type of searching goes way beyond this by letting you search using more complex criteria. Gmail is trying to help combat the spread of viruses by implementing a "feature" that prevents emails containing attachments of certain file types from being delivered to Gmail accounts. Again, note that this only affects inbound email originating from another email provider sent to a Gmail account.
While this may not be a definitive list, at least we can get a better picture of what the busy Gmail developers are working on!
In an earlier tip, I briefly explained how to perform Advanced Searching using Gmail's "query words". Taking this concept a step further, you can use this method to search for all "Un-Labeled" messages.
So, if you want to list all unlabeled messages, just create a long search string containing every label that you have defined.
If you have a large number of labels, obviously, this becomes harder and harder to manage, so I recommend reating a "note" email to yourself containing the search string for easy future reference. Gmail has a (debatably) nice feature that automatically adds to your Contacts list the email addresses of those to whom you send emails. So, every once in a while, I take time to be sure to monitor my Contacts list and clean out any unneeded entries.
Once again, the hard working Gmail Developers have implemented yet another much-requested feature: Import Contacts! For the best explanation of just how to Import Contacts, log into your Gmail account, click on Contacts, and click on the new "Import Contacts" link at the top of the Contacts screen. Just remember that currently, Gmail's Contacts fields are limited to just "Name", "Email Address", and "Notes". Gmail's COntacts aren't sophistocated, but now that you can Import, they certainly are more useful!
If you have assigned Labels and archived unread messages, finding them later can sometines be challenging. Gmail currently does not provide the facility to send emails to a Group or a List or email addresses.
By leveraging Gmail's new "Import Contacts" (see Gmail Tip #24), you can easily generate an importable file from your Hotmail Contacts. Just set up Outlook Express to access your Hotmail account (by creating a new account, making it HTML, not POP3, and giving your Hotmail account name and password.) Then, open Windows Address Book, and synchronize.
Those crazy yet wonderful Gmail Developers have once again brought us a new toy: Gmail Notifier!
The Gmail Notifier is a downloadable Windows application that alerts you when you have new Gmail messages.
You can also have it be the default "mailto:" handler so that when you click on an email address on a Web page, Gmail Notify will open a Compose Window. One cool feature of Gmail Notifier is that it can be configured to act as the default "mailto:" handler. While viewing a message, click on the "More Actions" dropdown, scroll to the bottom of the list, and select the desired Label to remove. If you are viewing a list of messages (say, in your inbox or in a Label view, click the checkboxes of the Labeled messages, click on the "More Actions" dropdown, scroll to the bottom of the list, and select the desired Label to remove. Don't forget that if the message has been Archived and you remove all Labels, it will be visible only in the "All Mail" view.
The "Contacts" function has been enhanced to provide some additional functionality, and now adopts the familiar Gmail interface.
Gmail now displays a "Contacts" link in the left column under the "standard views" (Inbox, Starred, etc.) and just above the Labels. Clicking on a contact displays the contact information as well as "Recent Conversations" associated with that contact.
Clicking on "Edit" allows you to update the basic contact information (Names, Email Address, Note).
Clicking on the "Add Contact" link lets you enter the standard "Basic" information, and clicking the "Add More Contact Info" link opens the extended information screen as descrived above. What really makes this shine is the fact that it now uses the same interface as the rest of Gmail giving it some better consistency.
If you are in the middle of composing a message, but want to finish it later, just click on the "Save Draft" button now located between the "Send" and "Discard" buttons.
Want to use your Gmail account as your main email account but have some or all email auto-forwarded to other email accounts? This is a "global" setting that lets you optionally forward all received email to another email address.
This setting will forward all received email to another email address and take the appropriate action on the received email. Filters have also been enhanced with a new "Forward it to: emailaddress" action letting you selectivly forward emails based on filter criteria.
If any of you Gmail users own "connected" PalmOS PDA's, you can now use SnapperMail to retrieve your email using Gmail's new POP3 feature! I tried out about 6 different email apps for the PalmOS, and the ONLY one I could get to consistently send and receive email from my Gmail account is Snapper Mail.
Log into your Gmail account, go into Settings, select the "Forwarding and Pop" tab, and enable the type of POP3 you want to do.
Set the "Use SSL" dropdown to "Always Secure (wrapped port)", set the port to "995" and leave the other checkboxes unchecked. Set the "Use SSL" dropdown to "Always Secure (STARTTLS)", set the port to either port "465" or "587" and leave the other checkboxes unchecked. I posted an article on how to access your Gmail account using SnapperMail via Gmail's POP3 feature. To configure Gmail, just enable POP3 in your Gmail Account by clicking on "Settings", click on the "Forwarding and POP3" tab, and then make the appropriate settings based on your situation.
First off, when you "archive" an "unlabeled" email message, it simply "drops out" of the Inbox view and is later ONLY accessible from the "All Mail" view. My general practice is to assign a Label to EVERY email I receive in my Inbox that I'm not going to trash.
In 1955, Isaac Asimov published a short story titled "Franchise", about a system that decides who should be elected president (in 2008) by picking a single voter to represent the whole population. If a single voter is regularly selected at random then, over time, a larger, more representative sample of the population will build up.
Distributed systems say "after a certain amount of time, enough votes will have been cast to be sure enough of a consensus". Each voter must be selected at random, but if this selection is performed by a central machine, that machine must be trusted.
The system will, generally, consume energy up to the value of the reward for casting each vote.
To save energy, votes can instead be given to those who have purchased the most shares (stake) in the system (i.e. Another alternative, valid for small populations, is to collect the sample in a single poll: invite all members to participate, and generate the consensus after a certain amount of time has passed.
I didn’t know Aaron, personally, but I’d been reading his blog as he wrote it for 10 years. Philip Greenspun, founder of ArsDigita, had written extensively about the school system, and Aaron felt similarly, documenting his frustrations with school, leaving formal education and teaching himself. In 2000, Aaron entered the competition for the ArsDigita Prize and won, with his entry The Info Network — a public-editable database of information about topics. Aaron’s friends and family added information on their specialist subjects to the wiki, but Aaron knew that a centralised resource could lead to censorship (he created zpedia, for alternative views that would not survive on Wikipedia). In order to pull information in from other people’s databases, you needed a standard way of subscribing to a source, and a standard way of representing information. RSS feeds (with Aaron’s help) became a standard for subscribing to information, and RDF (with Aaron’s help) became a standard for describing objects. I find — and have noticed others saying the same — that to thoroughly understand a topic requires access to the whole range of items that can be part of that topic — to see their commonalities, variances and range.
He found that it was difficult to make political change when politicians were highly funded by interested parties, so he tried to do something about that. To return to information, though: having a single page for every resource allows you to make statements about those resources, referring to each resource by its URL.
Aaron had read Tim Berners-Lee’s Weaving The Web, and said that Tim was the only other person who understood that, by themselves, the nodes and edges of a “semantic web” had no meaning.
To be able to understand this information, a reader would need to know which information was correct and reliable (using a trust network?). He wanted people to be able to understand scientific research, and to base their decisions on reliable information, so he founded Science That Matters to report on scientific findings.
He had the same motivations as many LessWrong participants: a) trying to do as little harm as possible, and b) ensuring that information is available, correct, and in the right hands, for the sake of a “good AI”. As Alan Turing said (even though Aaron spotted that the “Turing test” is a red herring), machines can think, and machines will think based on the information they’re given. As much as individual, composable objects are interesting, the real understanding comes when a collection of items is analysed as a whole (or a part, if filtered). There’s more to a collection of items than is immediately obvious - it’s not just a [1, 2, 3] list, with "array" methods for filtering and iteration: the Collection itself is an object with its own set of observable properties - many of which are summaries, in some way, of the properties in the items in the collection.
These summaries describe some aggregate quality of the collection, and - ideally - an indication of the variance, or confidence intervals, for that value within the collection. If you look around, you’ll see trees with different coloured leaves, depending on their genotype and phenotype. So: observed properties of a collection can vary over time, or over space, depending on the conditions in which they’re found and the conditions of observation.
The observed colour of a tree - or a collection of trees - is a function with many inputs and one output: the wavelength(s) of light that leave the tree and enter your eye (or some other detector). For any collection of items, a function can be written that describes one of their properties under certain conditions. For example, the value(s) that this function outputs might be the mean (average) and standard deviation of a series of measurements over time, or it may group those values into buckets (the sort of data that might be displayed as a bar chart).
If you’re working with JSON or HTML (which is probably the case), these interface names make no sense. As is apparently the way with all DOM APIs, XMLHttpRequest wasn’t designed to be used directly. When an action (get, put, delete) is performed on a Resource, a Request is made to the URL of the resource.
Instead of sending hundreds of requests to the same domain at once, send them one at a time: each Request is added to a per-domain Queue. Google Plus was formed around one observation: most of the people on the web don't have URLs. For example, to show you which restaurants people you trust* have recommended in an area you’re visiting, a recommendation system needs to have a latitude + longitude for the area, a URL for each restaurant (solved by Google Places) and a URL for each person (solved, ostensibly, by Google Plus). People might be leaving reviews in TripAdvisor, or Yelp, and there’s no obvious way to tie all those people together into any kind of coherent social graph.
Google Plus has an extremely clever way of linking together all those accounts, which involves starting with one trusted URL (Google Plus account), linking to another URL (GitHub, say), then linking back from that URL to your Google Plus account to prove that you own the GitHub account and can write to it. The problem is (and the question “why” is an interesting one), even after people had their Google Plus account, they didn’t use it to post reviews. When Google tried to connect YouTube accounts to Google Plus accounts, and failed, it was because people felt that those personas were distinct, and wanted the freedom to do certain things on YouTube without having it show up on their “personal record” in Google Plus. This also perhaps explains why people are wary of using Google Plus authentication to sign in to an untrusted site - they’re not so much worried about Google knowing where their accounts are, but also that the untrusted site might create a public profile for them without asking, and link it to their Google Plus profile. Anyway, Google Plus is going away as a social network, and maybe even as a public profile, but the data’s still going to be connected together behind the scenes - perhaps using fuzzier, less explicit connections as a basis for recommendations and decision-making. You might notice that the published property is represented as a String, when it would be easier to use as a Date object. From this definition, you can see that the publishedDate property has a dependency on the published property: any computed properties should be updated when any of its dependencies are updated.
This is fine when the dependencies are all stored locally, but it’s also possible to imagine data that’s stored elsewhere.
The Resource object used above is a Web Resource, part of a library I built to make it easier to fetch and parse remote resources. In either of those cases, the data is being fetched asynchronously, and a Promise is returned.
I talked about this kind of thing at XTech in 2008, illustrating the object as a Katamari Damacy-style of “ball of stuff”, being passed around various different services and accumulating properties as it goes.
Talis’ data platform had a similar feature, where results from a SPARQL query could be augmented by passing each result through another data store, matching on identifiers and adding selected properties each time.
The SERVICE feature of Wikidata’s SPARQL endpoint is also similar: it takes an object in each result and passes it to a specific service, assigning the resulting data to a specified property. In OpenRefine, remote data can be fetched from web services and added to each item in the background. The web is no longer a desktop publishing platform, it’s most often a networked medium for machine-machine communication. All the old “features” that came part and parcel with printed documents are relics of an age where information was fixed in stone (well, wood pulp). Emscripten comes with its own SDK, which bundles the specific versions of clang and node that it needs. I’ve made a fork of xml.js which a) allows all the command-line arguments to be specified, so can be used for validating against a DTD rather than an XML schema, and b) allows a list of files to be specified, which are imported into the pseudo-filespace so that xmllint can access them.
For third-party libraries, you can either download production-ready code manually to a lib folder and include them, or install with Bower to a bower_components folder and include them directly from there. The benefit of this approach is that you can edit the source files through GitHub’s web interface, and the site will update without needing to do any local building or deployment.


Keep the config files in the root folder, but move the app’s source files into an app folder.
Use Gulp to build the Bower-managed third-party libraries alongside the app’s own styles and scripts.
While keeping the source files in the master branch, use Gulp to deploy the built app in a separate gh-pages branch. The actual app source files (index.html, app styles, app-specific elements) are in the app folder. Earlier this week I attended a “Big Data Investigation Workshop” run by British Library Labs as part of the International Digital Curation Conference. The workshop was an introduction to working with tools for cleaning, analysing and visualising collections of data: OpenRefine (which is great but showing its age), Tableau (which is ridiculously impressive) and Gephi (which has fast graph layout but lacks usability). As the workshop was co-organised by the Internation Crime Fiction Research Group, the theme of the data was “Crime Fiction”.
Although the news story didn’t link to any source data, it almost certainly came from the Electoral Commision’s register of donations to political parties. Running a basic search of the Electoral Commision’s register, with no filters, produced a CSV file containing all registered donations since 2001, which we then loaded into Tableau Public (Tableau’s limited, free desktop application for data visualisation). The first visualisation was a simple bar chart of the total donations to each party, including only “political party” recipients, coloured according to the type of donation. The next visualisation was a summary of the donations from the individuals named in the news story. Getting Tableau to recognise UK postcodes is a bit tricky, as it doesn’t recognise the full postcode - we had to write a function to separate out only the first part of the postcode.
I’d been making graphs of Spotify’s “Related Artists” network, but was finding that pieces of the graph often remained disconnected. To connect these disparate parts of the network, I queried last.fm for the top tags that had been attached to each artist, and added those to the graph.
This brought the network together nicely, so I applied it to a larger data set: all the unique artists that had ever been played on a particular BBC 6 Music radio show.
The full graph of artists and their tags was interesting, but to get a clearer overview of the show’s musical themes, the artist nodes were hidden after the graph had been laid out (using Gephi's "Force Layout 2" algorithm).
This left just the tags, laid out in two dimensions, where the most similar tags are closest together and the most frequently used are largest. As some of the labels were overlapping, I used Gephi’s "Label Adjust" layout algorithm to shift their positions enough that most of the overlapping was avoided. One problem was that when several artists shared the same name, irrelevant tags would be attached to an artist. In a sense, the artists are the “dark matter” of the graph: they pull the tags together and organise their macroscopic structure, but remain invisible in the final, visible map. It may be that a highly-concentrated cluster of artists (as well as one or two very loosely-connected artists) pushed some tags further apart than they deserved to be. Process those two CSV files into a list of pairs of connected identifiers suitable for import into Gephi.
Switch to the Preview window and adjust the colour and opacity of the edges and labels appropriately. It would probably be possible to automate this whole sequence - perhaps in a Jupyter Notebook. Among CartoDB’s many useful features is the ability to merge tables together, via an interface which lets you choose which column from each to use as the shared key, and which columns to import to the final merged table. CartoDB can also merge tables using location columns, counting items from one table (with latitude and longitude, or addresses) that are positioned within the areas defined in another table (with polygons).
I've found that UK parliamentary constituencies are useful for visualising data, as they have a similar population number in each constituency and they have at least two identifiers in published ontologies which can be used to merge data from other sources*. Once the parliamentary constituency shapefile has been imported to a base table, any CSV table that contains either of those identifiers can easily be merged with the base table to create a new, merged table and associated visualisation. So, the task is to find other data sets that contain either the OS “unit id” or the ONS “GSS code”.
Given an index of CSV files, like those in CKAN-based stores such as data.gov.uk, how can we identify those which contain either unit IDs or GSS codes? As Thomas Levine's commasearch project demonstrated at csvconf last year, if you have a list of all (or even just some) of the known members of a collection of typed entities (e.g. In a General Election, the residents of each UK parliamentary constituency elect one Member of Parliament to represent them in the House of Commons.
Each party can nominate a maximum of one candidate per constituency, often chosen from a shortlist of potential candidates in a selection contest.
Candidates who wish to stand for election must submit their nomination papers within one week after the notice of election has been published (i.e.
However, candidates usually start their campaigning several months earlier, and their intention to stand for election will often be announced in a local newspaper. AndyJS’ spreadsheet and a derived list of candidates by constituency, via the Vote UK Forum.
Dods People, a commercial monitoring service, used as the data source for the MHP General Election Campaign Outlook (GECO). As well as prospective parliamentary candidates, some MPs will be contesting their seats again, and some will be standing down.
Every 5 years, the Boundary Commissions for England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland review the UK parliamentary constituency boundaries. The last completed Boundary Review recommended 650 constituencies, and took effect at the General Election in 2010.
The Office for National Statistics (ONS) has produced a guide to parliamentary constituencies and a map of the current constituencies. The Office for National Statistics publishes a CSV file listing the names and codes for each parliamentary constituency (650 in total), under the Open Government License. The parliamentary constituencies of England are named in The Parliamentary Constituencies (England) Order 2007. The Ordnance Survey produces the Boundary-Line data, which includes an ESRI Shapefile for the boundary of each parliamentary constituency.
The Ordnance Survey’s administrative geography and civil voting area ontology includes a “hasUnitID” property, which provides a unique ID for each region, and a “GSS” property that is the ONS’ code for each region.
The Boundary-Line Shapefile includes the Unit ID (OS) and GSS (ONS) code for each constituency, so they can easily be used to merge the boundary polygons with other data sources in CartoDB. If using CartoDB’s free plan, it is necessary to use a version of the Boundary-Line Shapefile with simplified polygons, to reduce the size of the data.
Following the next Boundary Review, the number of constituencies will be reduced from 650 to 600 by the Parliamentary Voting System and Constituencies Act, introduced by the current coalition government. Via Nautilus’ excellent Three Sentence Science, I was interested to read Nature’s list of “10 scientists who mattered this year”.
One of them, Sjors Scheres, has written software - RELION - that creates three-dimensional images of protein structures from cryo-electron microscopy images.
I was interested in finding out more about this software: how it had been created, and how the developer(s) had been able to make such a significant improvement in protein imaging.
I was hoping for a link to GitHub, but at least the source code is available (though the “for free” is worrying, signifying that the default is “not for free”). On the RELION Wiki, the introduction states that RELION “is developed in the group of Sjors Scheres” (slightly problematic, as this implies that outsiders are excluded, and that development of the software is not an open process). The file is downloaded over HTTP, with no hash provided that would allow verification of the authenticity or correctness of the downloaded file.
There’s an AUTHORS file, but it doesn’t really list the contributors in a way that would be useful for citation. Original disclaimers in the code of these external packages have been maintained as much as possible.
The source code for RELION should be in a public version control system such as GitHub, with tagged releases.
The CHANGELOG should be maintained, so that users can see what has changed between releases.
There should be a CITATION file that includes full details of the authors who contributed to (and should be credited for) development of the software, the name and current version of the software, and any other appropriate citation details.
Each public release of the software should be archived in a repository such as figshare, and assigned a DOI. There should be a way for users to submit visible reports of any issues that are found with the software. The parts of the software derived from third-party code should be clearly identified, and removed if their license is not compatible with the GPL. For more discussion of what is needed to publish citable, re-usable scientific software, see the issues list of Mozilla Science Lab's "Code as a Research Object" project. I used a PHP client to connect to Twitter’s streaming API as I was interested in seeing how it handled the connection (the client needs to watch the connection and reconnect if no data is received in a certain time frame). The streaming API uses OAuth 1.0 for authentication, so you have to register a Twitter application to get an OAuth consumer key and secret, then generate another access token and secret for your account. The dat server that was started earlier with dat listen is listening on port 6461 for clients, and is able to emit each incoming tweet as a Server-Sent Event, which can then be consumed in JavaScript using the EventSource API. Big companies (Google, IBM, Wolfram) are positioning themselves to be the repository where sensors store their data. Other companies are building platforms for applications to make use of that data in real-time.
There’s a piece missing: it should be possible to query those data stores to build up a snapshot of information, then document and publish the collection of data (and the harvesting process) for others to read and explore.
Firstly, seed-harvester imports an initial collection of items (which may be as simple as a list of identifiers or URLs) from CSV, JSON, or a JavaScript function that fetches the initial data set. Secondly, leaf-builder provides an interface for adding leaves (properties; computed or otherwise) to each item of the data set. Thirdly, vege-table itself extends HTML tables to present the collection of items, generating a row for each item and a column for each leaf. Once all the leaves have been added, the data collection can be published by exporting the table description and data files, placing them in the same folder as the main index.html file, and switching off the database.
In one day, two separate authors demonstrated that they’ve solved the problem of “how to publish your research on the web”. Dominic Tarr analysed the performance of different JavaScript cryptographic libraries, and Jure Triglav collected tweets mentioning sunny weather and correlated them to actual weather reports.
The reports are online for anyone to read, and the code and data are in version-controlled repositories, with instructions for anyone to reproduce them. The README file describes the purpose of the project, the dependencies, what was tested, how to reproduce the experiments, and what license the project is released under. The process for generating the data (a Bash script that calls node commands) is present, and its usage is documented in the human-readable README. All the machine-readable metadata needed for the project, including the list of dependencies, is present in package.json. The results are written up as a paper in Markdown (including figure images directly from the output folder). The data is continuously updated in the background, and the figures and text are updated in real time. Note that neither of the reports have “references” sections at the end, for the simple reason that they don’t need to: if they need to refer to anything, they just need to link to it in the (hyper)text.
The Microdata DOM API allows JavaScript programs to read and write data embedded in HTML as Microdata. As specified by the W3C Working Group, document.getItems(itemtype) returns a collection of all the elements with an itemscope attribute in the current document that have the given itemtype attribute. Each itemscope element has a properties object that provides access to all of the element's itemprop descendants (either contained directly or referenced elsewhere in the document using the itemref attribute).
These methods and properties allow the program to access all the Microdata nodes and values in the document. The HTML is very simple: a single container for the whole card, with two sections inside - one for the front and one for the back.
If you can't tell why a technology would be useful to you, it's not for people, it's for the robots. Google Glass provides machines with vision and access to a network of institutional knowledge. Bitcoin allows machine-machine transactions to be processed without needing any evaluation of trust. Stephanie Haustein and colleagues recently described the lack of correlation between tweets about an article (using Altmetric data from July 2011 - December 2012) and formal citations of the article. I decided to look at the data for smaller sets of articles, published in specific journals. Import a CSV file, with columns "doi" and "citations", to a new project named "citations_scopus". Stars are a great hand applique primer, you will get very good at inside and outside points! Batting is the stuffing of the quilt, it can be cotton, polyester, wool, silk, and even a blend - most often poly-cotton.
I use a number 10 between needle and a thimble, and I use a rocking stitch, which is like a running stitch.
Her father owned a famous Italian restaurant for many years and she cooked along side him from when she was a little girl. Lisa's parents will be preparing a pancake breakfast in chef costume, you don't want to miss it! Their is a beautiful private pool at the wedding site (bring your suits) we will all be hanging out at the house on Sunday all day and eating leftovers.
As such, specific features, issues, and opinions many have since been changed, updated, or corrected. After having tried and used literally dozens of web-based email services over the years, I decided to see what the buzz was all about, so I followed the Invitation instructions, and within a couple minutes, I had a new Google Gmail account. Managing email has become very easy while at the same time having powerful tools to find and review information.
To me, a personal web-based email account is essential because I do not always have access to my home PC.
The real issue is that for the first time, the general public is finally beginning to understand a concept that has been used and upon which they have been depending for years.
They are much like the "Sponsored ads" you see on the right of a Google Search results screen.
This is standard functionality with one glaring problem: If the original email is HTML or Rich Text formatted, Gmail will strip out ALL formatting including links, fonts, and images.
The overall power of Gmail is in its message management, searching and archival capabilities. Archiving a message simply tells Gmail to remove the message from your Inbox screen and keep it in your "All Mail" screen.
Every email you have sent or received (that you have not sent to Trash) is searchable from the Search screen.
The fields aren't exclusive either--you can enter search text int multiple fields to narrow down the searches.
For example, if I want to find the email that had the City "Spokane" in it, but I don't know how to spell Spokane, I'm out of luck.
I forwarded this list to Gmail's "Feedback" page, so hopefully, they will consider some of them. This may seem like an odd suggestion, but currently, if a message is in HTML or Rich Text format, Gmail strips all formatting, links, and images resulting in a simple, plain text message.
Yes, I could click on the "More Actions" dropdown and select it from the list, but I would rather have an easy-to-find button. Say that I have a lot of emails residing on another email account that I would like to have "transferred" to Gmail. Yes, I could "Forward' them to another account, but it would be nice to have an online function that saved them all to .eml files and Zipped them all up for easy download. Once we have hundreds or thousands of emails, being able to globally process emails may become essential. It has some excellent features that are truely innovative, but at the same time, there isn't a lot of "depth" to many of the features. But given that this is beta, Google seems to be responsive, and Google has always provided solid tools, I'll venture a guess that the final release will be an excellent service. Over at the Gmail forum at Webmaster World is a posting on how to "import" emails into your Gmail account using Eudora. After several failed attempts with Eudora, I decided to go in a slightly different direction. OE uses whatever "Name" you set up in OE's account properties as the "From" instead of the original email address.
OE uses the date you process as the email date, not the original email date, so that bit of data gets lost. Over time, I'll simply apply additional Labels to the archived messages to better organize them.
Gmail lets you assign a Label to a message and then view all messages assigned to that Label. Using the Folder model to categorize the messages, you would create one folder called "Family" and one called "Jokes".
Now, instead of having folders, say you have sheets of labels, some marked "Family" and some marked "Jokes". This means, for example, that if you use Gmail's Search function to search for a message, if you "check" the message in the Search results view, when you then select a Label view or any other view that includes that email in its listing, the mesasge will be "pre-checked" for you! When the message arrives in your Gmail account, it will automatically be archived into your "Notes" Label view, bypassing the Inbox. Because you used the name "Notes" in the Contact, Gmail will fill in the email address automatically eliminating the need to enter a long address. So, if you have three pages of messages, only the first page will be affected if you click "All". It now shows something like "Gmail - Inbox (2)" where the "2" is the number of new emails you have.
If you want to affect only one of the messages, select or expand the message and click on the "More options" link. By this, I mean that sometimes (but not always), if you have unrelated emails with the same subject, they sometimes get grouped together in the same conversation. I'm not refering to the hype and false assertions of pundits who claim things like "Gmail keeps everything you ever send and receive!" and "Gmail archives your messages forever!" No, I'm refering to the "Archive" button in your Inbox view.
If you applied a Label to the message and then click "Archive" button, the message will no longer be visible in the Inbox. While viewing a list of messages (for example, "Inbox") look in the first column on the left of the message listing.
In any case, contrary to some false information being spread, you still retain full control of your messages.
You can select any of these messages or conversations to view, and Gmail automatically highlights the word(s) you searched for.
While this doesn't affect most messages, this behavior can mangle HTML-formatted messages, dropping important formatting, images, and data. This is very apparant with email originating from online services like AOL and with clients like Outlook. In my opinion, this is the one "feature" that prevents me from sending invitations to family and friends who are not computer savvy. Searching can be as simple as entering a keyword or two into the Search field at the top of any page to very complex using Gmail's advanced "Query Words" to better constrain searches. And there is no need to open the Search Options--these can be entered in the simple search window at the top of any page. You could open the "Show Search Options" pane, select the "Family" Label from the dropdown, and click "Search Mail". For example, building on our example above, say you want to search for messages containing attachments from your family sent before May 21, 2004?
These file attachments are very easy to inadvertently execute, and are a common source of viruses.
This does not affect Gmail users sending email to another Gmail user or to an email address outside of Gmail. Here are two practical examples of how to use the "label:" query word to search for Multi-Labeled messages as well as Un-Labeled messages.
For example, you want to display all messages with label1, label2 and label3 that you had previously defined and assigned. Unfortunatly, Gmail does not provide a choice in the search dropdown that lets you search for unlabeled messages. While this can be helpful at times, just remember that EVERY unique email address you send to gets auto-added. Gmail will let you import address books into Contacts from Yahoo!, Orkut, Outlook, and pretty much any other service by uploading CSV (Comma Separated Value) files to your Gmail account. Simply create a Gmail Label named "Unread", and you will see all of your unread mail in that folder. But thanks to an excellent tip submitted by "arianj", we now have a very doable workaround!
It displays an icon in your system tray to let you know if you have unread Gmail messages, and shows you their subjects, senders and snippets, all without your having to open a web browser.
Clicking on the link brings up a nicely formatted display that matches the style of the rest og GMail.
But there's a new link: "Add More Contact Info" which lets you add additional "Sections" of information. Entering text into this field and clicking the button returns all contacts that BEGINS WITH the text. That has always been one of Gmail's strengths: a slick, clean, non-cluttered, fast interface. This droops the message in a new view located on the left side called "Drafts" located under the "Sent Mail" link and above the "All Mail" link. You can use the same or different email addresss for each filter if you choose providing very powerful email management. Like SnapperMail, it is a very slick, full-featured email client, and it provides SSL connectivity. Though I cover Archiving in Gmail Tip #12: "Archiving" Explained, I feel that some general email management tips are in order.
While this is straight forward, it can be cumbersome if you have more than a handful of email messages. To avoid this, everyone in the system is given a task that is guaranteed to give each participant an equal chance of completing first - a chance which is increased only by how much work they do. When it turned out that he wasn’t going to be writing any more, I spent some time trying to work out why. Also, some people might add high-quality information, but others might not know what they’re talking about. To teach yourself about a topic, you need to be a collector, which means you need access to the objects.
It could contain metadata for each item (allowable up to a point - Aaron was good at pushing the limits of what information was actually copyrightable), but some books remained in copyright.


He also saw that this would require politicians being open about their dealings (but became sceptical about the possibility of making everything open by choice; he did, however, create a secure drop-box for people to send information anonymously to reporters). Each resource and property was only defined in terms of other nodes and properties, like a dictionary defines words in terms of other words. If an AI is given misleading information it could make wrong decisions, and if an AI is not given access to the information it needs it could also make wrong decisions, and either of those could be calamitous. Your eye analyses the light arriving from the tree, and your brain tries to summarise the wavelengths that it’s seeing.
To be able to understand the shared properties of items in a group, and differences from items in a different group, is to begin to understand them. They’ve read Tim Berners-Lee’s books, and understand that there are Resources out there, with URLs that can be used to fetch them. And that’s before you get into the jQuery.ajax option names (data for the query parameters, dataType for the response type, etc). It also doesn’t return a Promise, though there’s an onload event that gets called when the request finishes. Even with Gmail, there's no way to say that the person you email is the same person who's left a review, unless they have a URL (i.e. Now that both of those URLs are trusted, either of them can be used as the basis of a new trusted connection: linking from the trusted GitHub URL to a Flickr URL, and then from the Flickr URL to the trusted Google Plus URL (or any other trusted profile URL), is enough to prove that you also own the Flickr account and can write to it. In this case, when the published property is updated, the publishedDate property is also updated.
The intense focus is on performance of Blink as a platform for mobile applications, and not at all on document rendering features. Hardly anyone writes English (though a lot of people, and some machines, can read it to some extent). This makes running xmllint in the browser much more like running xmllint on the command line.
We added a filter on the donor name, searched for their surname and selected those names which matched (there were several variations on each donor’s name in the database), then used Tableau’s grouping to group together the name variations. Once this was done, Tableau easily mapped the location of each donor, to produce the final visualisation: a map of each donation to a political party, coloured according to the recipient party and sized according to the value of the donation. To avoid this, only the artists that had been given MusicBrainz IDs in the BBC data were included, and these MBIDs were used to query last.fm for tags. I'd like to be able to do the same thing in D3, as Gephi is quite awkward to use, and has cropped the node labels when exporting the above images (it seems to only take the nodes into account when cropping the output, and not their labels).
Fusion Tables creates a virtual merged table, allowing updates to the source tables to be replicated to the final merged table as they occur. The UK parliamentary constituency shapefiles published by the Ordnance Survey as part of the Boundary-Line dataset contain polygons, names and two identifiers for each area: one is the Ordnance Survey’s own “unit id” and one is the Office for National Statistics’ “GSS code”. Although there’s usually a property name in the first row, there’s rarely a datapackage.json file defining a basic data type (number, string, date, etc), and practically never a JSON-LD context file to map those names to URLs. For example: country names (a list of names that changes slowly), members of parliament (a list of names that changes regularly), years (a range of numbers that grows gradually), gene identifiers (a list of strings that grows over time), postcodes (a list of known values, or values matching a regular expression).
The Boundary-Line data is published under the OS OpenData license, which incorporates the Open Government License. On that page is a link to “Download RELION for free from here”, which leads to a form, asking for name, organisation and email address (which aren’t validated, so can be anything - the aim is to allow the owners to email users if a critical bug is found, but this shouldn’t really be a requirement before being allowed to download the software). They are difficult to find: trying to download XMIPP hits another registration form, and BSOFT has no visible license. Apart from the folder name, the only way to find out which version of the code is present is to look in the configure script, which contains PACKAGE_VERSION=‘1.3’. The data table is paginated, sortable, filterable, and includes footer rows that summarise columns using facets where appropriate.
This is most likely what people will see first, so it links to the code repository for all the information needed to repeat the experiments.
In theory this is good, but as it’s published in a system that doesn’t yet have version control, there’s no ability to compare past versions. However, browsers never fully supported the API, and are dropping any native support that did exist. However, in order to provide this flexibility, the DOM API can be quite long-winded when reading the value of a single property, which is most often what's needed. A5), divided into two equal halves (front and back), produced using only HTML and CSS (and a PDF conversion). After writing a few scripts to fetch and parse data to CSV from various web services, using the DOI as the key for each row, I realised that it would be easier to gather the data in OpenRefine by incrementally adding columns.
You can layer and baste it as for quilting, and then tie it every 3-4 inches with yarn or crochet cotton, using a doll needle or big darning needle. In the near future, I will try to indicate on each affected article or Tip where changes may have occurred, and where later Tips preempt previous Tips. After working with this account for several days, I have discovered some things that I like about it as well as some things that I don't. Gmail supports most of the popular browsers, and even a few obscure ones, so if you use an alternate browser, be aware that your mileage may vary.
Sure clients like Outlook are great, but if you can't access your PC, you simply can't easily access your email. Then I'll detail some suggestions that, in my opinion, would make the service significantly better. Opponents have said that Google's approach to inserting ads based on message content is a huge privacy breach.
In fact, they don't even show up on every email message that you read, and so far, that's the only place you see the ads: when reading messages.
One nice feature is that if you have contacts set up, as you type the contact's name, a quick menu of contacts containing the letters you typed comes up.
In order to really leverage this, you need to get past the "I have to delete everything because I don't have enough storage space" mindset. It's similar to "folders" but it goes much farther: You can optionally assign a user-definable Label to any email. If you are going to utilize buttons for some functions, be consistent across the interface. Then, we could select just a Contact label for emailing and it should sent to all contacts with that label--kind of like a mailing list.
This is large enough to show a good number of conversations, but small enough to prevent the user from having to grab the mouse to scroll down the page on a typical 1024x768 Windows XP screen. Unlike many popular webmail services, there is no caledering, no email list management, no extended contact information, and there are some pending functionality issues, but as a beta, it certainly has some teeth to it. Yes, I just lost the organization I had to all these messages, but I'll take the time to use Gmail to quickly re-label them. OE nicely imported them with all information (dates, original email addresses, etc.) intact. You affix "Family" labels to all messages from your family, and you affix "Jokes" labels to all messages that are jokes.
Just select the Label view from the Labels box on the left, "select" the specific message by clicking the checkbox next to the message, and then click on the "Remove label 'xxxx'" button at the top of the listing. Then, when you click send, the email gets sent to yourself, and is auto-archived in the Notes Label, just like above. Assuming they follow your directions, You can then set up a Gmail Filters to automatically route emails to specific Labels based on the addresses. That way, whenever you get future emails addressed to that address, you'll know that it's either from Amazon directly or from someone to whom they sold your email address.
Just what is it for, and what does it do?""Plain and simple, clicking Gmail's "Archive" button simply means that the message gets moved out of your Inbox--nothing more, nothing less. Conversations conveniently organize related messages, but this can be potentially dangerous if you don't understand how to manage both conversations and individual messages.
Providing this extra space gives you the ability to leverage features such as "Search", "Labels", and "Conversations". Any message, either sent or received, can be easily and permanently deleted as you desire; the same as any other email service.
My sometimes, it's distracting, so you now have the ability to click on the "Turn off Highlighting" link on the right column.
For example, I received an email from my parents' AOL account that contained an inline graphic image. For example, say you want to search for all email that is unread, regardless of under what Label it is filed.
Or, you could just enter into the search box at the top of any page "label:family" and hit Enter!
Gmail is trying to make it at lease a bit more difficult to inadvertently execute these types of files. If you are sending an email from an outside account to a Gmail user, simply changing the extention to something else appending something like ".txt" lets the message pass through without issue. If you manage a large number of messages, it can be very cumbersome to determine which messages are unlabeled. This ensures that messages with these labels will be EXCLUDED (remember, you are looking for all messages WITHOUT Labels.) You can also optionally include the hidden "inbox" Label to exclude anything in your Inbox.
So, if someone or some company sends you an emai and you reply to it, the email address will get added. Any you have manually edited will typically have a "Name" and possibly a "Note" associated with it. Though there are other ways to display unread messages, the nice thing about this method is that it displays the number of unread messages right in the Label list. This is intentional, because during auto-complete, Gmail adds these characters to the beginning and end of the full string that is in the e-mail field. Gmail Notifier will open a Compose Window in a new browser window with the email address auto-filled in.
It displays the contact name, email address, Note, and any additional information (see below).
This is important to know because it will search ALL contact fields (even the :extended fields) for words beginning with the entered text.
For example, I may get statement notifications from a bank and want to auto-copy it to my wife.
The problem with the "All Mail" view is that it includes just that: all email, labeled or otherwise, and Gmail provides no easy way to find "unlabeled" email.
I didn’t find out why the writing had stopped, exactly, but I did get some insight into why it might have started. If everyone had their own wiki, and you could choose which trusted sources to subscribe to, you’d be able to collect just the information that you trusted, augment it yourself, and then broadcast it back out to others. The colours might cycle over time, as day and night pass, and they might cycle over longer periods, as seasons pass.
The further away you look, the greater likelihood that the colour of a tree will be more different from the closest trees - the variance within the collection will increase. If this property was bound to the original table, you would see the new values being filled in as the data arrives! If this was available it would be ideal, as then the bower_components folder could be left out of the built app.
In particular, we looked at a recent news story in The Independent, which stated that “three senior figures at scandal-hit [HSBC] bank donated ?875,000" to the Conservative Party in recent years. Pleasingly the totals almost exactly matched those given in the news story, for the three named donors. There’s no way to know what has changed from the previous version, as the previous versions are not available anywhere (this also means that it’s impossible to reproduce results generated using older versions of the software). Happily, this is the format in which Twitter’s streaming API provides information, so it's ideal for piping into dat. Once a leaf has been attached to an item, the data added can then be used to build further leaves. That’s ok though, as long as it’s saved in the Internet Archive whenever someone refers to it. I've written a jQuery plugin that provides equivalent functions and makes them easier to use. Gmail on one hand is just another free email service, it really has the potential to become the next "killer app", because it has some innovations not found elsewhere. So much so that some legislators have proposed legislation to prevent Gmail from implementing this at all.
All Gmail is doing is running your message through a "processor" that looks for ad-related keywords so that it can display unobtrusive targeted ads. When they are displayed, the email sender can use this to track that you opened the message thus validating your email address for future spam.
To me, this is a HUGE problem because it means that a nice, formatted message gets "altered".
With 1GB of storage, the average email user will have enough storage space to hold several years worth of emails.
Once a message has been archived, should you ever want to, you can easily move it back to the inbox, but there really isn't a need for that. Then, when you click on a specific label in the label list on the left of the screen, Gmail displays only those emails under that label.
Your brother sends you a joke email, so where do you put it--the Family folder or the Jokes folder? In fact, now that I've had a taste of Gmail's searching capabilities, I sorely miss it on my other email accounts. Instead, I would like to be able to "export" the emails from my current acount in .eml format, and then "import" them into Gmail seamlessly. Gmail's interface is very fast, primarily because it is NOT cluttered with the marketing glitz and images that clutter so many other webmail services. Before I improted them into Gmail, there was simply no easy way to manage my old messages to find relevent information.
I next created a new Label called "Mail Archive" and did a Search on all emails that had a "From" of "Archived".
Think of the "plus" word as an extra "keyword" or "tag" that you can use to better manage your messages.
Likewise, there is currently no way to manually "group" seemingly unrelated messages into a conversation.
If no Label was applied, it is removed from the Inbox and is only viewable in the "All Mail" view. If you aren't paying attention, you can inadvertently Trash an entire conversation instead of just a single message. Many email clients and Webmail services let you optionally delete all sent messages by default, but Gmail doesn't offer this feature. Most email services limit us to a very small storage space, so we have to continually delete old messages to allow room for new ones. I could view it just fine in Gmail, but when I tried to forward it to my wife's email account, it dropped the image and only forwarded the plain text. Simply click the "Search:" dropdown, select "Unread Mail" and click the "Search Mail" button. You could also use another archive format like WinAce or WinRAR as they are not filtered (yet). My personal preference is to ensure that all messages have a Label making it easier to manage and organize them. By default, any Contact Gmail auto-adds and is unedited will not contain any "name" or "note" information, just the email address.
Each section contains a Section Name field, Two user-selectable "fields" and an "Address" block. For example, entering "Ste" would return "Stephanie", "Steve", and "Stewart" but entering "phani" would not return "Stephanie". I just set up a filter to select emails with the bank's sending email address and then select the "Forward it to:" action and enter my wife's email address.
To me, an "unlabeled" email is an uncategorized email that has "fallen through the cracks" and must be Labeled.
Each of my online profiles on different sites is literally a different “profile”, and I only choose to link some of them together. Authorship is immaterial (jk, partly), and when is anything ever authored by a single person, anyway?
What I did on this quilt was to sew a strip of tough canvas to the side that would string to a flag pole. Gmail does, however, need some polishing in a number of areas before it's really "ready for primetime". Gmail's process of scanning your messages is technically no more intrusive than EVERY service like Yahoo Mail, Hotmail, and EVERY email service that offers virus scanning and spam protection. Gmail's ads are FAR less annoying than the flashy lights and huge billboards that services like Yahoo Mail and Hotmail use. My complaint is that if this is supposed to be marketed to the masses, they have grown to expect to be able to simply forward on what they received and expect it to arrive at its destination intact. Gmail's Labels let you assign multiple labels to each email, so you could label your brother's joke email with both "Family" AND "Jokes" labels. I also set the "Leave messages on server" function checked for safety--didn't want to lose anything.
This way, I wouldn't inadvertently select anything that might have come into my Inbox while I was "processing" all the "Archived" emails. Unlike Folders, you can assign multiple Labels to a message letting the message span multiple categories.
When you want to look for a message from your Father, you just look in the "Family" folder.
When you want to see all Family messages, you just grab all the messages that have "Family" labels. Not only is it "checked" but it is also highlighted in a different color making spotting it in a long list very easy. In any case, all messages, regardless of how thery are classified, can be viewed in the "All Mail" view.
To test this, take any email that's in your Inbox and apply a Label, but do not Archive it.
The problem is that though there are definitely many messages that should be permanently deleted, many are important enough to us that we may need or want to keep them for future reference. Yes, I could save the image and then attach it to the forward, but it's a kludgy workaround and not very intuitive to "casual" users. The point is that the file won't be immediatly and inadvertently executable without some recipient intervention. I don't know what the criteria for "Frequently Mailed" is, but it does contain the most-used contacts.
Each User Field has a drop-down label containing the following selectable labels: Phone, Mobile, FAX, Pager, Email, IM, Company, Title, Other.
Obviously, it would be nice to have extended search capabilities, but this is an excellent start!
All the while, I have kept a "vanity" email account with NetIdentity (who uses "SecurePath" technology), and though I do pay for their account, their web-based email interface is very simplistic and the space is limited. ALL of these services "scan" every word, every character, every phrase in your emails to determine if there is a virus present or if the message might be spam. Google has a proven track record, and they would be committing corporate suicide if they were to breach that record. And, given that the ads are intended to be targeted based on message content, you shouldn't see inapropriate or unrelated ads. At present, there is no facility to import or export the contacts list, but Gmail support says that they are planning on adding it.
You can apply a label to it (more on labels later), you can trash it, or you can report it as Spam.
Now, when you click the "Family" label in the label list, you see your brother's email along with all the other emails from family members. I then proceeded to select "All", then applied the label "Mail Archive", and then selected "Archive" from Gmail's "More Actions" dropdown.
To better understand how Labels differ from Folders, counsider the the real-world counterparts, and it should become clear. Some may also have "Jokes" labels, but you don't care because you are interested in your Family messages. Gmail's processing simply differs in that instead of matching message text against virus or spam pattens, it is matching against ad-related keyword lists.
Yes, it could happen, but if you are really that paranoid about Gmail's processes, I suggest you not open a Gmail acocunt and look elsewhere. In Gmail's defense, their support emails do say that they are planning on adding an HTML editor, so presumably, this may be resolved, but as of this beta, it isn't. Likewise, when you click on the "Jokes" label, you also see your brother's joke email along with all of your other joke emails. This really was tedious, because for some reason, despite setting Gmail to display 100 conversations at-a-time, Gmail only displays 20 conversations at-a-time in the Search results view. Likewise, when you grab all the messages labeled "Jokes", some may also have "Family" labels, but again, you don't care because you are looking at Jokes.
If the message hasn't been "Archived" yet, it will see "Inbox" Label in the "All Mail" view.
Obviously what you do with it is up to you, but I make it a personal rule to always edit any email addresses I want to keep and add names (and sometimes notes). I currently have over 1600 email message in Gmail, and effective use of Labels and Searching are the only way to manage them effectively. Anyway, then tie the quilt, with yarn or crochet cotton, using a doll needle or big darning needle. At first, this may not seem too exciting, but after a while, you will see how this could be very powerful, especially with large numbers of accumulated emails.
Further, if you only want to look at jokes from your family, you grab only the messages with BOTH "Family" AND "Jokes" labels.
If the message had one or more other Labels assigned, it will still show up in those Label views.
Check off the "Allow SMTP Authentication" checkbox and then enter your full Gmail email address in the "SMTP Username" field and assign the password. When you Archive a message, it simply strips off the "inbox" Label so that it doesn't show up in the Inbox view.



Getting back with an ex is it a good idea 74
Get your own back game show


Comments

  • raxul, 08.11.2014 at 18:43:32

    About transferring rolling you will want to use what Michael wording and.
  • Bezpritel, 08.11.2014 at 23:29:58

    Into this how To Get My Spouse Again then you should go to How To Get.