If you feel this image is in violation of our Terms of Service, please use the following form to have it manually reviewed by a staff member. Here’s a chart of the top Post-apocalyptic science fiction books, and when they were published.
In the 1950s, people worried about communism and nuclear war, and science fiction reflected those concerns.
Around 1980, it was plague and danger from space, and science fiction reflected those concerns. In a ruined and toxic future, a community exists in a giant silo underground, hundreds of stories deep. A high-altitude nuclear bomb detonates above the US, and the resulting electromagnetic pulse (EMP) fries the entire power grid and nearly every electronic device.
A nameless son and father wander a landscape blasted by an unspecified cataclysm that has destroyed most of civilization and, in the intervening years, almost all life on Earth.
An indie (read: self-published) list entry, The Atlantis Plague is actually book two of a series, but its popularity and reviews are strong enough to warrant inclusion. Some reviewers have complained about Howey’s over-complicated plots, stereotypical femme fatales, and long-suffering housewives. Instead of fencing off his world and characters, Hugh Howey has actively encouraged fans to write and publish their own fan fiction. When a nuclear holocaust ravages the United States, a thousand years of civilization are stripped away overnight, and tens of millions of people are killed instantly. John Lennon was given a copy of Alas, Babylon in 1965 and spent all night reading the book, fueling his anti-war fervor and causing him to envision the people of the world attempting to crawl their way back from the horrors of a nuclear catastrophe. It does, however, feature the effects of genetic engineering, climate change run wild, and primitive semi-humans.
Without warning, giant silver ships from deep space appear in the skies above every major city on Earth.
Unrelated to the Silo series, Sand left some reviewers felt the ending was a little rushed.
Earth Abides tells the story of the fall of civilization from deadly disease and its rebirth. Stephen King has stated that Earth Abides was an inspiration for his post-apocalyptic novel, The Stand (which almost made it on this list, but just wasn’t science-fictiony enough). Unfortunately, the book dates itself with references to hippies, Black Panthers, and Women’s Libbers, and by not liking any of those groups of people. This is Miller’s first and only novel, but he didn’t hold back: it spans thousands of years, chronicling the rebuilding of civilization after an apocalyptic event.
Despite early reviewers that called Miller a “dull, ashy writer guilty of heavy-weight irony,” it’s never been out of print in over 50 years.
Like all the best post-apocalypse stories, the famous and well-respected On the Beach examines ordinary people facing nightmare scenarios.
In this case, a mixed group of people in Melbourne await the arrival of deadly radiation spreading towards them from the northern hemisphere following a nuclear war. Sequel to fellow list-member Oryx and Crake, in The Year of the Flood, the long-feared waterless flood has occurred, altering Earth as we know it and obliterating most human life.
Reviewers have noted that while the plot was sometimes chaotic, the novel’s imperfections meshed well with the flawed reality the book was trying to reflect.
The Day Of The Triffids is a classic, one of the cornerstones of the post-apocalyptic genre. Narrated by a ghost that watches over the million-year evolution of the last group of humans on the planet, Galapagos questions the merit of the human brain from an evolutionary perspective. Emergence is one of the overlooked gems of science fiction with a small but passionate following whose glowing reviews nudged this relatively unknown book onto this list. It follows a remarkable 11-year-old orphan girl, living in a post-apocalyptic United States.


Author Hoban was known more for his children’s books when he published Riddley Walker. I loved World War Z by Max Brooks (son of comedian and filmmaker Mel Brooks), but there wasn’t enough science in the fiction to warrant inclusion. Yes, the movie was HORRIBLE; literally establishing the standard against which all awfulness will ever be measured again.
The story is so good that, the first time I read it, I actually was sad that I had read it because I could never read it for the first time again. I agree whole heartedly, would also recommend David Robbins End World series, although I’ve only read a limited amount of the series because its not a very well known series.
Firelance by David Mace, I shall await your reading of such, and watch for a review….
Someone realy should have the Deathlands series on this list author James Axler, we love these books. I’ve included a few of these in my own round-up, and it’d be great if you could check it out and let me know what you think!
Desktop users: right click on the image and choose "save image as" or "set as desktop background".
Australia Canada New Zealand EnglandApocalyptic and Post-Apocalyptic FictionforumGet the forum going! Not even during the Cold War were science fiction books about the apocalypse and life afterward so popular.
War, viruses, natural global disasters, genetically modified humans, computers run amok, you name it.
There, men and women live in a society full of regulations they believe are meant to protect them. However, given his massive popularity, those issues (if they even exist) haven’t bothered too many people.
But for one small town in Florida, miraculously spared, the struggle is just beginning, as men and women of all backgrounds join together to confront the darkness.
No nuclear war, no bizarro plague, no surly computers, and no genetic experiment gone haywire.
It traces the fate of the world after a comet shower blinds most of the world’s population. Set in a remote future in a post-nuclear holocaust England (Inland), Hoban has imagined a humanity regressed to an iron-age, semi-literate state—and invented a language to represent it. Sheriff Holston, who has unwaveringly upheld the silo’s rules for years, unexpectedly breaks the greatest taboo of all: He asks to go outside.
The few with sight must struggle to reconstruct society while fighting mobile, flesh-eating plants called triffids. Riddley is at once the Huck Finn and the Stephen Dedalus of his culture—rebel, change agent, and artist. That score probably doesn’t hold up to much statistical scrutiny, but it worked as a good starting place. This is our life, diving for remnants of the old world so that we may build what the wind destroys. I’ve recommended it many times, often loaning out my ragged personal copy, and the reviews have been utterly singular in their ringing praise. This free website is a great source of ongoing fiction accessible to all, covering a number of genres, so it’s great to see my post-apocalyptic saga being so well received there. The serial follows the union of two wayward survivors in a British wasteland: one a no-nonsense young lady doing what she has to to survive, the other a man who is convinced he is already dead. Hugh Howey has changed the landscape of publishing with his ongoing silo series, and with all eyes on the regularly released shorter component stories, this has been something akin to the Dickensian serials of centuries ago.
Consumed eagerly by readers in small chunks before being combined in this collection of three stories, like Wool before it, Shift is a compendium of tales designed to keep bringing readers back to the bleak world it explores.


It piles on the claustrophobic underground confinement, destructive apocalyptic conspiracies and a general overwhelming sense of misery. Split over three parts, divided by centuries, we are given an insight into the other silos in the time leading up to Jules’ escape in the first novel. There’s Silo 1, where the overseers keep an eye on the ongoing project, Silo 17, where a chaotic uprising leads to decades of isolation for a sole survivor, and Silo 18 itself (much earlier), where a lowly porter finds himself at the heart of a civil war.
By expanding the scope of the tale, it loses a little of the claustrophobic grimness of Wool, but it’s a worthy continuation of the tale, and is sure to leave you wanting for more. At just under five minutes long, this video shows all the popular views of Paris, including the Champ Elysees, the streets of Montaparnasse and the Eiffel tower all empty of people and traffic. Scroll down to watch it now!The filmmakers took video footage of the City of Light and edited out all the people in thousands of individual frames, to give a devastatingly empty location, akin to the starts of such apocalyptic films as 28 Days Later or I Am Legend. Spanning centuries of story, it is a literary tome that has been compared with many of the greats (such as Evelyn Waugh and Graham Greene) for its insights into the human condition.
What starts as a little white lie, that he represents a Restored United States, brings hope to those he visits, and gradually builds into a very big white lie.
Certainly in the final third it slips more towards the action and adventure of more pulp fiction sci-fi.
But there’s more to it than that, with its underlying philosophical message and the central themes of symbolism that pervade each section. The different leaders the post-apocalyptic survivors adopt represents a different kind of hope, and speak about people’s need, in general, for leadership.
With more developed societies, including tribal groups who stockpile weapons, this story builds on the theme of how one man make a difference – and how one small idea can blossom into a big one. But long before that iconic film, pulp fiction was a thriving business in the publishing industry, as escapist fiction in books and magazines that readers regularly tuned in to to tune out of everyday life. It was responsible for laying the groundwork for many of the stories explored on this website, so it’s worth knowing about!This fiction was published in the early 20th century, printed on cheap paper (literally coming from a wooden pulp) with a throwaway concept.
Its rapid demands for writing encouraged hard and fast creative talent, which had a heavy influence on the emergence of new writers in the middle of the 20th century. In particular, science fiction genres, crime genres, adventures and romances had strong roots in pulp fiction. An American Baptist preacher, he spread a message of the Second Coming of Christ (and ultimately the arrival Judgement Day), which another preacher announced would come on October 22nd, 1844. With the benefit of hindsight, his movement is perhaps better known, now, as The Great Disappointment. This leads him to looking into a scientist called Felix Hoenikker, who helped design the atomic bomb, and takes John on an eventual journey to the fictional tropical island of San Lorenzo. On the way, and whilst there, John meets the Hoenikker children and gradually learns about a substance called Ice 9. He brilliantly combines satirical humour that harks back to the irreverence of Mark Twain with exciting sci-fi and adventure themes.
As it should be deservedly preserved: the adventurous story is as strong as any in our book lists.
A disaster, referred to as a plague, has killed everything else with a Y chromosome – and taken out a few women too, in the process.
Hiding himself in disguise, Yorick starts a trek across America, determined to find his girlfriend (in far off Australia).
Fiction serial, Pilgrimage of the Damned, available to read free online at Jukepop Serials.Site designed and written by Copywrite Now. Wordpress Theme by ThemeZee Send to Email Address Your Name Your Email Address Cancel Post was not sent - check your email addresses!



Lung cancer radiation survival rate 2014
How to survive freezing cold 2014

Rubric: Business Emergency Preparedness



Comments

  1. Selina
    From those ?�road gaders' the truckers showed that there have been EMFs being emitted.
  2. spaider_man
    Also, determine an evacuation route from your.
  3. EmiLien
    His experiences as a chocolate-complexioned boy in his 2011 children's this electro-pollution induced pressure on the.
  4. insert
    Item you can store in a Faraday cage some time so I barely realize computer systems, programs.
  5. AmirTeymur
    Folks together according to how considerably.