Alternatively, if someone did not have internet access, they could call our customer service centre and ask to speak to the Emergency Planning Team.
Best practise would ask for three interviews with three different people in three different locations, but this is not always possible.
Looking at the meetings you have planned (two or three) and try and decide different ways to spend the time.
If you want to find out information in Step 3 you need the right questions before the interview.
It's important to have a writer to record the meetings incase any questions arise in the future. Within the digital, creative and marketing sectors the team we have is our most valuable asset, and as such hiring decisions are critically important. Can you afford not to sit down and spend between 4 and 8 hours to ensure that you do that process to the very best of your ability? If you require any help in interview planning, or interview training for managers that have had no formal training, then please contact us. Come along, talk to the members of the Hackspace, bring along a project or just have a chat. Creative Kitchen returns to Manchester with the ever popular “Developer Breakfast” in partnership with Manchester Digital. The Developer Breakfast is our chin-wag we host in order to share experiences, vent constructively and naturally build a Manchester community of developers, creatives, designers and technically-minded entrepreneurs. For this next event we will continue our support of local, independent venues by taking the Creative Kitchen to Foundation on Lever Street, in Manchester city centre. We aim to continue to breakdown barriers and to encourage knowledge sharing, with the long-term goal of supporting the growth and development of the region’s creative and digital sector. As always, this informal gathering promises a mixture of the city’s leading digital and creative doers and makers. Working in or interested in the web, mobile, internet of things, computer games and digital strategy and marketing sectors? As it’s half-term you are welcome to bring your little people with you to join the Creative Kitchen conversation. This workshop is appropriate for a experienced eBay sellers aiming to expand both within the UK and globally. The Graduate Certificate in Emergency Planning is designed to prepare the executive security professional for assessing and designing contingencies for public and private security measures in a global society.
Anyone interested in completing the Emergency Planning Certificate may complete a Southwestern College Professional Studies Graduate Application for Admission. Individuals completing the Emergency Planning Certificate at Southwestern College may apply all of these 15 credit hours earned toward a Master of Science in Security Administration degree. Vulnerability Assessment (3 cr hrs) This course emphasizes real?world concepts, principles, and processes for building security and safety design, including assessing needs and working with security consultants. This course provides a comprehensive overview of America's homeland security system, including key federal, state, local, and private organizations. Learners in this course will examine the current ability of national, state, and local agencies to respond to terrorism.
Learners in this course will thoroughly examine the complex issues surrounding terrorism via a discussion of theories, domestic and international threats of terrorism, motivations for terrorism, and a review of the various religious, ideological, nationalistic, and ethnic movements taking place around the world. This course outlines the essential roles of corporate and municipal managers and demonstrates the importance of their relationships with federal, state, and local government agencies as well as public and private community sectors. All learners will prepare and submit a professional electronic capstone portfolio as a graduate requirement in this course.
Shane ValVerde, R6 PSC, takes a break in front of the center for domestic preparedness training facility while attending the IMAT Academy.
Shane ValVerde recently achieved a coveted position as an emergency management planning section chief in FEMA Region VI, which oversees Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas and 68 federally recognized tribal nations. ValVerde comes from a long line of service members and knew right from the beginning that he would follow in those dusty footprints. As he recovered from his career-ending injuries, ValVerde, like many veterans, struggled with the prospect of living in the civilian world.
Armed with his new direction, ValVerde began taking courses through FEMA and his state’s emergency management office in order to strengthen his military training and qualifications. While in school, ValVerde took a position as a situation unit leader on a FEMA type-III incident management team, which was an on-call position. ValVerde noted that he is always excited to work with the many veterans who also work with FEMA. True to his military roots, ValVerde’s advice for the next generation of veterans begins with a clearly identified objective. Threats and risks to Canadians and Canada are becoming increasingly complex due to the diversity of natural hazards affecting our country and the growth of transnational threats arising from the consequences of terrorism, globalized disease outbreaks, climate change, critical infrastructure interdependencies and cyber attacks. A key function of the Government of Canada is to protect the safety and security of Canadians.
Effective EM results from a coordinated approach and a more uniform structure across federal government institutions. A SEMP establishes a federal government institution's objectives, approach and structure for protecting Canadians and Canada from threats and hazards in their areas of responsibility and sets out how the institution will assist the coordinated federal emergency response.
The development and employment of a SEMP is an important complement to such existing plans, because it promotes an integrated and coordinated approach to emergency management planning within federal institutions and across the federal government.
Federal government institutions in the early stages of developing a SEMP may find it useful to read the material in Sections One and Two, while other institutions with more established plans may wish to proceed directly to Section Three.
Supporting templates and tools can contribute to effective emergency management planning and are provided with this Guide. The Emergency Management Planning Guide uses a step-by-step approach and provides instructions that are supplemented by the Blueprint and the Strategic Emergency Management Plan (SEMP) template provided in Annexes A and B, respectively.
The Emergency Management Planning Unit, Public Safety Canada, is responsible for producing, revising and updating this Guide.
The purpose of this Guide is to assist federal officials, managers and coordinators responsible for emergency management (EM) planning. The EM plans of federal government institutions should address the risks to critical infrastructure within or related to the institution's areas of responsibility, as well as the measures for protecting this infrastructure. The SEMP is the overarching plan that provides a comprehensive and coordinated approach to EM activities. Given this variety of EM planning documents, the distinctions between them are summarized in the following table. A SEMP establishes a federal government institution's objectives, approach and structure for protecting Canadians and Canada from threats and hazards in their areas of responsibility, and sets out how the institution will assist the coordinated federal emergency response.
It outlines the processes and mechanisms to facilitate an integrated Government of Canada response to an emergency and to eliminate the need for departments to coordinate a wider Government of Canada response.
It includes 13 emergency support functions that the federal government can implement in response to an emergency. Operational plans may be based on all four pillars of EM planning, or focus on the specific activities of a single pillar. The National Strategy and Action Plan for Critical Infrastructure establishes a public-private sector approach to managing risks, responding effectively to disruptions, and recovering swiftly when incidents occur.
Implementation of the Strategy will feature targeted and accurate information products, such as security briefings for each critical infrastructure sector. Emergency management (EM) refers to the management of emergencies concerning all hazards, including all activities and risk management measures related to prevention and mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery. The Emergency Management Continuum is depicted in a wheel diagram where all four risk-based functions of emergency management are interconnected and interdependent in a system from prevention and mitigation to preparedness, response, and recovery. In the center of the wheel are the main elements that influence the development of a Strategic Emergency Management Plan (SEMP). Figure 1 highlights the four interdependent risk-based functions of EM: prevention and mitigation of, preparedness for, response to, and recovery from emergencies. The SEMP should ideally be reviewed on a cyclical basis as part of a federal government institution's planning cycle, as presented in Figure 2 below. This figure represents the optimal planning cycle federal institutions should consider for undertaking their emergency management planning activities. May: Senior Institutional Management reviews year-end reports from the previous year's activities. September: Senior Institutional Management conducts mid-year check on progress of key performance objectives. February: Senior Institutional Management makes decision regarding the institution's strategic priorities for the upcoming fiscal year. This section of the Guide outlines a recommended approach for developing a tailored SEMP and is supported by a blueprint and a SEMP template provided in Annexes A and B, respectively.
Please note that Step 5 is presented under Section Four: Implementing and Maintaining the SEMP. Each step identifies inputs or considerations at the outset and concludes with the associated outputs. This step involves starting the formal planning process in recognition of the responsibility to prepare a SEMP.
Consider having members of the EM planning team designated by your institution's senior management.
One of the most crucial steps in the EM planning process is to identify appropriate members for the EM planning team. Consider including a member of your institution's corporate planning area on the EM planning team in order to help align the EM planning cycle with the institution's overall business planning cycle. Federal government institutions should consider identifying the range of experience and skill sets required in the EM planning team. The team members should have the skills and training required to adequately carry out their assigned duties. The team members should have the skills and training required to adequately carry out their assigned duties. The composition of the EM planning team will vary depending on institutional requirements; however, it is important that clear terms of reference (TOR) for the team be established and that individual assignments be clearly defined. After the EM planning team has clear authority and direction, the next step is to review any relevant existing legislation and policies. Consider giving a team member the responsibility of analyzing the legislative and policy obligations applicable to the development of the SEMP. As noted in Section Two, the EM planning process should be carried out as part of an institution's overall strategic and business planning processes—this will support their alignment. Developing the SEMP can be supported by a formal work or project plan to ensure that established timelines for plan development are met. As a next step, federal government institutions should consider developing a comprehensive understanding of the planning context. Additional supporting planning tools and templates as well as an EM glossary are provided in Annexes C and D, respectively. An environmental scan involves being aware of the context in which an institution is operating so as to understand how it could be affected.
As part of the environmental scan, the institution defines the internal and external parameters to be taken into account when managing the risk and setting the scope and risk criteria for the remaining risk assessment process. Additionally, federal government institutions are responsible for conducting mandate-specific risk assessments, including risks to critical infrastructure. The Planning Context is represented in a target diagram that consists of three circles representing the factors federal institutions should consider in order to understand the context in which it operates and how it could potentially be affected. The outer and middle circles represent the external context in which the institution seeks to achieve its objectives. Understanding the internal context is essential to confirm that the risk assessment approach meets the needs of the institution and of its internal stakeholders. Understanding the external context is important to ensure that external stakeholders, their objectives and concerns are considered.
Consider reviewing your federal government institution's most current environmental scan, as well as the most current RCMP Environmental Scan (which can be found on the RCMP Web site), in order to develop a better understanding of pressures and issues facing your institution. Once all documentation is identified, consider conducting a gap analysis to determine whether the institution is currently meeting its obligations as identified in Step 1. During this process, consider conducting a full review and analysis of stakeholder documentation and reports. An inventory of critical assets and services will assist the planning team in identifying the associated threats, hazards, vulnerabilities and risks unique to their institution. If a business impact analysis (BIA) has already been completed for your federal government institution's BCP, this analysis can greatly inform your criticality assessment.


When conducting a criticality assessment, it is important to be objective when prioritizing the importance of institutional assets, as not all assets are critical to an institution's operations. Adopting the current Treasury Board Policy related to material and asset management and coding criteria will help structure an effective approach.
A comprehensive but non-exhaustive list of hazards and threats relevant to the Canadian context can be found in Annex C, Appendix 3. Traditionally, a threat assessment is an analysis of intent and capabilities in the occurrence of a threat. A vulnerability assessment looks at an inadequacy or gap in the design, implementation or operation of an asset that could enable a threat or hazard to cause injury or disruption. In order to identify vulnerabilities, an institution should first identify and assess existing safeguards associated with critical assets and activities. Risk assessment is central to any risk management process as well as the EM planning cycle. The output of the risk assessment process is a clear understanding of risks, their likelihood and potential impact on achieving objectives.
The all-hazards risk assessment (AHRA) process should be open and transparent while respecting the federal institution's context. In this section, risks translate into events or circumstances that, if they materialize, could negatively affect the achievement of government objectives. Once the institution's context is clearly understood (refer to the environmental scan in Step 2-1), the next step is to find and recognize hazards, threats and possibly trends and drivers, and to describe them in risk statements.
Risks can be identified though several mechanisms: structured interviews, brainstorming, affinity grouping, risk source analysis, checklists and scenario analysis. A risk register or log is used to record information about identified risks and to facilitate the monitoring and management of risks.
The objective of risk analysis is to understand the nature and level of each risk in terms of its impact and likelihood.
Qualitative analysis is conducted where non-tangible aspects of risk are to be considered, or where there is a lack of adequate information and the numerical data or resources necessary for a statistically significant quantitative approach. Consider consulting your institution's subject matter experts when evaluating quantitative likelihood through historical data, simulation models and other methods. Consequences can be expressed in terms of monetary, technical, operational, social or human impact criteria. The purpose of risk evaluation is to help make decisions about which risks need treatment and the priority for treatment implementation. Risk criteria are based on internal and external contexts and reflect the institution's values, objectives, resources and risk appetite (over-arching expression of the amount and type of risk an institution is prepared to take).
Risks can be prioritized by comparing risks in terms of their individual likelihood and impact estimates. The risk-rating matrix allows for decisions to be made about which risks need treatment and the priority for treatment implementation. Risk treatment options can be prioritized by considering risk severity, effectiveness of risk controls, cost and benefits, the horizontal nature of the risk, and existing constraints. Consider gathering a list of institutional risks and cross-referencing the existing plans (as identified in Step 2-1c) that address each risk. This step will contribute to the concept that sound EM decision-making can be based on an understanding and evaluation of hazards, vulnerabilities and related risks. This step focuses on developing an informed EM approach for your institution based on the four pillars of EM. Each institution should establish an EM governance structure to oversee the management of emergencies. In identifying members of your institution's EM governance structure, keep in mind the relationship between your institution's mandate and the four pillars of EM. It is important that the planning team confirm the strategic priorities of the institution and of senior management so that they can be reflected in the SEMP. Consider developing an overview of these priorities and identifying potential areas for attention given risk probabilities and vulnerabilities.
The planning team should aim to clearly identify the planning constraints and institutional limitations that will influence the SEMP building blocks and the subsequent development of the SEMP. The cross-reference table of existing plans by identified institutional risks provided in Annex C, Appendix 4, can assist in cross-referencing your most prevalent risks and the tools in place to address them (such as existing plans).
A SEMP should inform each federal government institution's overall priorities and tie into its business and strategic planning activities. The objective of planning activities associated with prevention and mitigation efforts is to reduce risk. The objective of planning activities associated with preparedness is to have an effective and coordinated approach to EM and operational readiness. Federal government institutions should consider personnel surge capacity requirements in their plans to support sustained operations, as well as the ability to react to any additional hazard or event that may occur while the response and recovery operations are taking place. The objective of planning activities associated with institutional responses to changing threats, hazards or specific incidents is to have an effective and integrated response in accordance with established strategic priorities.
Think about engaging your communications branch so that they are aware of internal and external communications requirements. The objective of planning activities associated with the recovery component of EM is to provide for the restoration and continuity of critical services and operations.
Once the event is over and response operations are completed, federal institutions should participate in any whole-of-government reviews as appropriate.
The SEMP establishes a federal government institution's objectives, approach and structure for protecting Canadians and Canada from threats and hazards in their areas of responsibility, and sets out how the institution will assist the coordinated federal emergency response. It’s the County Council Emergency Planning Team’s job to make sure that Northamptonshire is as prepared as it can be for extreme weather, an accident, or other circumstances that might put us at risk. You’ll help run reception centres providing a base for emergency service personnel and a refuge for evacuees.
Infact, if five excellent years at the MD support group Vistage taught me anything - it was exactly that! We are in a hurry and we need someone yesterday - this is not a great planning environment I grant you, but planning as the name implies, is best done in advance and this is no exception. Everyone needs to fully understand the role, including the candidates and a good job description facilitates this. The point here is that this person will cost you a lot of money if they fail, whether they are recruited with a fee or directly.
If you are having multiple interviews then find out what questions are used in which interview. Just pre-register for free, turn up and purchase a sublime coffee, fresh tea or delicious breakfast treat. You will learn simple, easy to implement processes, which will lead to continuous increased sales through new and repeat business both in the UK and globally.
At the end of the course, you’ll be confident your site is professional quality and working its hardest for you. Threats to safety and systems are examined and emphasis is given to the analysis of models and practices. The five courses comprising the Emergency Planning Certificate can be completed in eight months or less in convenient six-week classes with no prerequisites. Security design concepts, security evaluation and planning, building hardening, security technology, and biochemical and radiological protection are covered.
Policy issues, technologies, legislation, preparedness recommendations, and trends are analyzed.
Lessons learned and best practices from past emergencies and terrorist events are reviewed to identify preparedness and mitigation methods. Consequence management is studied with a review of the incident management system, federal response plan, weapons of mass destruction effects, mass casualty decontamination, crime scene operations, and technology and emergency response. The emergency response plan, hazards, personnel training, and hazard and risk reduction strategies are covered. The portfolio serves as an opportunity for the learners to demonstrate their achievement of their respective degree program outcomes through their degree program coursework, and their commitment to lifelong learning through the identification of specific future learning goals. He moved with his family to Denton, Texas, and works out of the FEMA regional headquarters there.
Bookended between an early enlistment into the Marine Corps at age 17 and an IED blast is a 12-year career spanning both the Marines and the Army Reserve.
Through a long road of reintegration and training, ValVerde said that his anxiety and culture shock was lessened by learning in an environment populated with first-responders and through the constant reassurance and camaraderie that he found while working with a veteran-focused nonprofit. After three years of school, extracurricular study, and thousands of volunteer hours, he became aware of the posting that would ultimately become his current position. He is a graduate of the Hauptmann School of Public Affairs with a MPA in disaster and emergency management.
Emergencies can quickly escalate in scope and severity, cross jurisdictional lines, take on international dimensions and result in significant human and economic losses. Federal government institutions are increasing their focus on emergency management (EM) activities, given the evolving risk environment in their areas of responsibility.
This is why Public Safety Canada has developed this Emergency Management Planning Guide, which is intended to assist all federal government institutions in developing their all-hazards Strategic Emergency Management Plans (SEMPs). Many federal government institutions already have specific planning documents or processes to deal with aspects of emergency management that relate to their particular mandates; many also have a long track record of preparing and refining BCPs. An All-Hazards Risk Assessment Framework and associated tools are also under development and will be included in a subsequent version of the Guide. As a matter of process, the Emergency Management Planning Guide will be reviewed annually or as the situation dictates, and amendments will be made at that time.
The Guide includes a Blueprint (see Annex A), a Strategic Emergency Management Plan (SEMP) template (see Annex B), and supporting step-by-step instructions, tools and tips to develop and maintain a comprehensive SEMP—an overarching plan that establishes a federal government institution's objectives, approach and structure, which generally sets out how the institution will assist with coordinated federal emergency management, including response. As such, federal institutions are to base EM plans on mandate-specific all-hazards risk assessments, as well as put in place institutional structures to provide governance for EM activities and align them with government-wide EM governance structures. It reflects leading practices (such as those provided by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and Canadian Standards Association) and procedures within the Government of Canada, and should be read in conjunction with the Federal Emergency Response Plan, the Emergency Management Framework for Canada and the Federal Policy for Emergency Management. It should integrate and coordinate elements identified in operational plans and business continuity plans (BCPs). Each of these functions addresses a need that may arise before or during an emergency. It is intended that governments and industry partners will work together to assess risks to the sector, develop plans to address these risks, and conduct exercises to validate the plans. This work at the sector level will inform, and will be informed by, work at the organizational level such as EM plans and their component parts. Those elements are as follows: Environmental Scan, Leadership Engagement, All-Hazards Risk Assessment, Training, Exercise, Capability Improvement Process, and Performance Assessment. These functions can be undertaken sequentially or concurrently, and they are not independent of each other. In order to effectively depict the cycle, the four seasons are placed in a wheel diagram showing how spring, summer, fall, and winter are interconnected and continuously flow into one circle. The upcoming year's critical objectives are indentified with input from the various Working Groups and the appropriate Business Lines. Emergency Management resource requirements should be identified as early as possible to integrate into plans. Inputs should ideally be assembled, reviewed and well understood prior to engaging in each distinct planning activity as they form an important foundation for the work to be completed. The SEMP should be central to the federal government institution's EM activities and provide clear linkages for integrating and coordinating all other intra-departmental and inter-departmental emergency management plans.
The size and composition of the team may vary between federal government institutions; however, the planning team should ideally have the skill and experience necessary to develop the SEMP.
This team should be established under the authority of the institution's governance framework and have clear directions, including objectives. Training is available to address EM requirements at the Canadian Emergency Management College (CEMC) and the Canada School of Public Service. Training is available to address EM requirements at the Canadian Emergency Management College (CEMC) and the Canada School of Public Service. These TOR can identify the responsibilities assigned to each team member and the requirements to allow that member to carry out the assigned function.
This is also an ideal time to involve institutional legal advisors to determine whether legislative requirements are being met. Update the analysis regularly, as legislation and policies can change and have an influence on the scope of your SEMP.
After completing the above steps, the planning team should consider developing a detailed work plan that includes a schedule with realistic timelines, milestones that reflect the institutional planning cycle, and a responsibility assignment matrix with assigned tasks and deadlines.


It entails a process of gathering and analyzing information and typically considers both internal and external factors (see Figure 3: The Planning Context for additional information on the factors to consider).
It sets the time, scope and scale and contributes to adopting an approach that is appropriate to the situation of the institution and to the risks affecting the achievement of its objectives. The key to any emergency planning is awareness of the potential situations that could impose risks on the organization and on Canadians and to assess those risks in terms of their impact and potential mitigation measures. It is the environment in which the institution operates to achieve its objectives and which can be influenced by the institution to manage risk.
If gaps are identified, these should ideally be gathered and presented as part of Step 3 when developing the EM Planning Framework and confirming the institution's strategic EM priorities. Assets can be both tangible and intangible and can be assessed in terms of importance, value and sensitivity. All available threat assessments should ideally be reviewed by analyzing the assessment's evaluation of hostile capability, intentions and activity, the environment influencing hostile and potentially hostile groups, and environmental considerations, including natural, health and safety hazards. For further information, you may wish to consult the Canadian Disaster Database, which contains detailed disaster information on over 900 natural, technological and conflict events (excluding war) that have directly affected Canadians over the past century. A threat awareness collection process should ideally link to the federal institution's information requirements and available resources. As appropriate, more specific terrorist threat and hazard information can be obtained from ITAC. With respect to known threats and hazards, a vulnerability exists when there is a situation or circumstance that, if left unchanged, may result in loss of life or may affect the confidentiality, integrity or availability of other mission-critical assets. It is a formal, systematic process for estimating the level of risk in terms of likelihood and consequences for the purpose of informing decision-making. It provides improved insight into the effectiveness of risk controls already in place and enables the analysis of additional risk mitigation measures.
A risk assessment should generate a clear understanding of the risks, including their uncertainties, their likelihood and their potential impact on objectives. It should be tailored to the institution's needs and should identify any limitations such as insufficient information or resource constraints. Risks should be described in a way that conveys their context, point of origin and potential impact. Characterization of risks should use an appropriate breadth and scope; it can be difficult to establish a course of action to treat risks if the scope is too broad, while a scope that is too narrow will create too much information, thereby making it difficult to establish priorities. A risk register will typically describe each risk, assess the likelihood that it will occur, list possible consequences if it does occur, provide a grading or prioritization for each risk, and identify proposed mitigation strategies. Probabilistic methods provide more information on the range of risks and can effectively capture uncertainty, but require more data and resources. It is usually used for analyzing threats with less tangible intent (judgements on terrorism, sabotage, etc.).
Subject matter experts can also assist in evaluating likelihood from a qualitative perspective, for instance by using a Delphi technique (a group communication process for systematic forecasting).
Additional information on analyzing likelihood and impact is provided in the Treasury Board Integrated Risk Management Framework Guidelines. Prioritization can be shown graphically in a logarithmic risk diagram, risk-rating matrix or other forms of visual representations. In order to prioritize risks, comparison is made based on their likelihood and impact estimates. Treatments that deal with negative consequences are also referred to as risk mitigation, risk elimination, risk prevention, risk reduction, risk repression and risk correction. These treatment options, forming recommendations, would be used to develop the risk treatment step in the risk management or emergency management cycle. A sample cross-reference table of existing plans by identified institutional risks is provided in Annex C, Appendix 4.
The resulting SEMP building blocks will reflect strategic priorities—the desired balance between developing measures that respond to emergencies versus mitigating the risk. The EM planning governance structure may include representatives of an institution's senior management team, from all functional areas (such as programs) and all corporate areas (including communications, legal services and security). It is also crucial that roles and responsibilities, lines of accountability and decision-making processes be aligned and well understood by all concerned. For example, an institution can be constrained by the availability of training for EM planning team members and by the number of EM positions they have staffed.
A further cross-referencing can then be undertaken with the four pillars of EM to help target specific activities in one or more of the following areas. The ICS helps to promote clear lines of authority, is scalable to large or small events, and is widely used by first responders such as police or fire departments in various jurisdictions. The cross-reference table provided in Annex C, Appendix 5, as stated above, can serve as a tool to complete this task. It should be strategic and be designed to have safeguards and processes to trigger appropriate actions in response to changing threats and hazards, as well as in response to specific incidents and events. Resources on the ground and community preparedness are vital to ensure that danger and lasting damage caused in an incident is minimised. Ensure you have enough questions to spend time with the candidate, an important part of the process.
If you want to work on an existing WordPress site you are more than welcome, but you don’t have to as we will provide a pre-installed site for up to a month for all attendees.
Our preference is the latest version of Firefox or Google Chrome, but the latest Internet Explorer or Opera will be fine too however, for part of the course you will need Firefox or Google Chrome. Learners will examine the cost-benefit comparisons of contemporary, theoretical and practical models. Conducting vulnerability assessments of physical protection systems from start of planning through final analysis, including senior management briefing, is examined.
Threat assessments, critical infrastructure protection, weapons of mass destruction, cyber?terrorism, business preparedness, and emergency response and public protection are covered as well. Contingency planning to protect vital facilities and critical operations is discussed via an implementation strategy, guidelines for minimizing development costs, and proven plan development methodology.
All learners will be required to prepare, conduct, and report on an applied learning project relevant to their degree program as a second graduate requirement in this course. ValVerde is an unstoppable spirit, charged with caffeine, nicotine, and crystallized determination. The final years of ValVerde’s military experience found him attached to 3rd Special Forces Group as a special operations civil affairs team leader in Afghanistan. However, he credits a battle buddy with helping him find direction and the idea to repurpose his military skills in a meaningful way in the civilian world.
Given the lackluster transition assistance ValVerde said he received from the military, he was very impressed with the veterans’ services at American Military University. Reach out to other veterans that are in your desired occupation and find a mentor, someone that can assist you with navigating the waters of getting into your new field. He is a Tillman Military Scholar and is developing the Community Vanguard Initiative, a veteran-focused organization centered on community engagement in emergency management.
EM can save lives, preserve the environment and protect property by raising the understanding of risks and by contributing to a safer, more prosperous and resilient Canada. It does not lay out the requirements for preparing related EM protocols, processes, and standard operating procedures (SOP) internal to the institution; however, these should be developed in support of the SEMP and related plans. As outlined in the Preface, many federal government institutions already have specific plans or processes to deal with aspects of emergency management; many also have a long track record of preparing and refining BCPs, which endeavour to ensure the continued availability of critical services. Each season has its own wheel quadrant describing the activities usually undertaken in each month of the year. Planning can be triggered by the EM planning cycle or it can be initiated in preparation for, or in response to, an event that is induced either by nature or by human actions. Consideration should be given to having representation from several program and corporate areas, including (if applicable) regional representation. Those federal government institutions that have mandated emergency support functions (ESFs) under the FERP should have these clearly identified.
Notwithstanding the blueprint provided, this step is not proposed as a linear process, but rather as a set of related components and activities that can be undertaken in the sequence that best suits the institution. Scanning can be done on a regularly scheduled basis, such as annually, or on a continuous basis for environmental factors that are dynamic or that are of greatest interest to the institution.
The following diagram illustrates the external and internal environmental factors to consider.
This process will add the extra assurance that your institution is linked in with partner agencies and others to assist in developing the broader environmental picture and in identifying EM-related interdependencies. Each institution has its own strategic and operational objectives, with each being exposed to its own unique risks, and each having its own information and resource limitations.
An all-hazards approach to risk management does not necessarily mean that all hazards will be assessed, evaluated and treated, but rather that all hazards will be considered. The aim is to generate a comprehensive list of risks based on those events that might prevent, degrade or delay the achievement of objectives. Risks should be realistic, based on drivers that exist in the institution's operating environment.
It can be a useful tool for managing and addressing risks, as well as facilitating risk communication to stakeholders.
Descriptive scales can be formed or adjusted to suit the circumstances, and different descriptions can be used for different risks. Risk evaluation is the process of comparing the results of the risk analysis against risk criteria to determine whether the level of risk is acceptable or intolerable. The one most commonly used is the risk matrix (Figure 4), which normally plots the likelihood and impact on the x- and y-axes (the measured components of risks). Similarly, certain assumptions will be made that influence the development of the SEMP building blocks. Although planning considerations will vary from institution to institution, the following identifies the most common planning considerations associated with the four pillars of EM planning.
Then finally, we have a third offer meeting to discuss what Orchard can do for the candidate. This project will cover theory, concepts, practices, knowledge, and skills covered across the respective degree program courses, and their application to a real?life or simulated situation. EM planning, in particular, aims to strengthen resiliency by promoting an integrated and comprehensive approach that includes the four pillars of EM: prevention and mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery.
In addition, there are other existing EM planning documents and initiatives that apply to a range of federal government institutions, such as the Federal Emergency Response Plan (FERP) and deliverables under the National Strategy for Critical Infrastructure. This is also an ideal time to develop an initial budget for such items as training, exercises, research, workshops and other expenses that may be necessary during the development and implementation of the SEMP.
Stakeholders may include First Nations, emergency first responders, the private sector (both business and industry), and volunteer and non-government organizations. This part of the process consists of three main activities: risk identification, risk analysis and risk evaluation. It involves the identification of risk sources, areas of impact, events and their causes, as well as potential consequences. A risk portfolio or profile can be created from the register, helping to compile common risks in order to assess interdependencies and to prioritize groups of risks. Existing controls, the cost of further risk treatment and any policy requirement implications are considered when deciding on additional mitigation measures.
Based on a risk diagram or rating matrix, a clustering of risks can be shown, leading to decisions on priorities. The aim is to develop a SEMP that integrates and coordinates elements identified in hazard-specific plans and BCPs.
For example, an assumption might be made that the resources required to develop the SEMP will be paid out of the current fiscal year's budget. Learners' projects from this course are also included in the final professional portfolio submitted at the end of the course. Institutions may choose to assess a portfolio of risks, as opposed to specific individual risks, which enables a holistic review of risk treatment decisions. Information can be gleaned from historical data, theoretical analyses, and informed and expert judgements.
Qualitative analysis is often simpler, but also results in high uncertainty in the results.
Such a plot can help establish acceptable or intolerable risk levels, and establish their respective actions.



American documentary filmmakers group
First aid kit review the lion roar
Disaster awareness preparedness and management ppt free
Free download film 720p download

Rubric: Electromagnetic Pulse Shield



Comments

  1. NicaTin
    Most US microwave ovens life and don't genuinely the ionosphere produces ionization and.
  2. RUSLAN_666
    Structure affected by the disaster generators divided into a handful.
  3. BI_CO
    Assured that Halton Area, as well as the regional municipalities.
  4. azercay_dogma_cay
    Significantly less but it is true I am pretty certain the.